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 Allergy Advisor Digest - March 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Can the presence of cat/dog at home be considered the only criterion of exposure to cat/dog allergens? A likely underestimated bias in clinical practice and in large epidemiological studies.
Read Chemical research on red pigments after adverse reactions to tattoo.
Read A review on emerging frontiers of house dust mite and cockroach allergy research.
Read Endotypes of Pollen Food Syndrome in Children with Seasonal Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: a molecular classification.
Read The minor house dust mite allergen Der p 13 is a fatty acid binding protein
Read The lipid-interaction capacity of Sin a 2 and Ara h 1, major mustard and peanut allergens of the cupin superfamily, endorses allergenicity.
Read In vitro tests for Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions. An ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group Position Paper.
Read Drug allergies documented in electronic health records of a large healthcare system.
Read Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.
Read Incidence and natural history of hen's egg allergy in the first 2 years of life-the EuroPrevall birth cohort study.
Read IgE antibodies in relation to prevalence and multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from birth to adolescence.
Read Structural similarities of human and mammalian lipocalins, and their function in innate immunity and allergy.
Read Evaluation of allergic sensitivity to Acanthamoeba allergen in patients with chronic cough.
Read The Hidden Culprit: A Case of Repeated Anaphylaxis to Cremophor.
Read Diagnostic value of specific IgE to Peanut and Ara h 2 in Korean children with peanut allergy.
Read The association between serum lead and total immunoglobulin E levels according to allergic sensitization.
Read Prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms and positive skin-prick test results in patients with dry eye.
Read The NPC2 protein: A novel dog allergen.
Read The economic effect and outcome of delaying oral food challenges.
Read Safety of chitosan processed wine in shrimp allergic patients.
Read Pollen used to produce allergen extracts.
Read Effect of desert dust exposure on allergic symptoms: A natural experiment in Japan.
Read Identification of wheat sensitization using an in-house wheat extract in Coca-10% alcohol solution in children with wheat anaphylaxis.
Read Cloning and characterization of recombinant tropomyosin of giant freshwater shrimp M. rosenbergii to determine major allergens causing allergic reactions among shrimp-allergic children.
Read Allergenicity of native and recombinant major allergen groups 1 and 2 of Dermatophagoides mites in mite sensitive Thai patients.
Read p-Phenylenediamine exposure in real life - a case-control study on sensitization rate, mode and elicitation reactions in the northern Netherlands.
Read A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin.
Read Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids: evaluation and management.
Read Is advising food allergic patients to avoid food with precautionary allergen labelling out of date?
Read Component-resolved diagnosis in anaphylaxis.
Read Contact dermatitis in saffron workers
Read Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.
Read Cinnamon spice and everything not nice: many features of intraoral allergy to cinnamic aldehyde.
Read Methylchloroisothiazolinone/Methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergy.
Read Patch testing custom isocyanate materials from the workplace.
Read Oral allergy syndrome (pollen-food allergy syndrome).
Read Gold contact allergy: clues and controversies.
Read Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from jewelry from a non-nickel directive country.
Read Nickel and cobalt release from children's toys purchased in Denmark and the United States.
Read Patch testing in children from 2005 to 2012: results from the North American contact dermatitis group.
Read Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents
Read Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.
Read Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.
Read Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergies can be detected by 200 ppm of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone patch test concentration.
Read Contact allergens in oral antihistamines.
Read Concomitant patch test reactions to mercapto mix and mercaptobenzothiazole: retrospective analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994-2008.
Read Oat and wheat as contact allergens in personal care products.
Read Patch testing for drugs.
Read The relevance of 7-day patch test reading.
Read Methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergic contact dermatitis and the effect of patch test concentration.
Read Allergic reactions to insect secretions.
Read Anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of jellyfish.
Read Proven Non-beta-Lactam antibiotic allergy in children.
Read Immunological characterization of Dutch sesame seed-allergic patients.
Read Adverse Reaction to Omalizumab in Patients with Chronic Urticaria: Flare Up or Ineffectiveness?
Read The complexities of early peanut introduction for the practicing allergist.
Read Clinical management of psychosocial concerns related to food allergy.
Read Exposure and health effects of fungi on humans.
Read Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.
Read Is microarray analysis really useful and sufficient to diagnose nut allergy in the Mediterranean area?
Read Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.
Read Matrix effect on baked egg tolerance in children with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy.
Read Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10 years experience in allergy work-up.
Read Prevalence and cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity in the first ten years of life.
Read Wheat protein recognition pattern in tolerant and allergic children.
Read Sensitivity and specificity of prick skin test with two concentrations of standardized extract of Culex quinquefasciatus in allergic children.
Read In silico analysis of the identity of lipocalin of dog, cat, horse, cow, hamster and hen.
Read A case of late-onset anaphylaxis to fermented soybeans (natto).
Read Allergic contact dermatitis due to carrots.
Read Study of the usefulness of patch testing and use test to predict the safety of commercial topical drugs.

Abstracts shared in March 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read The role of allergen components for the diagnosis of latex-induced occupational asthma.
Read Papain induced occupational asthma with kiwi and fig allergy.
Read Shellfish and house dust mite allergies: Is the link tropomyosin?
Read Classification of food allergens and cross-reactivity.
Read IgE-mediated sensitization to malassezia in atopic dermatitis: more common in male patients and in head and neck type.
Read Cor a 14, Hazelnut-Specific IgE, and SPT as a reliable tool in hazelnut allergy diagnosis in Eastern Mediterranean children.
Read Majority of shrimp-allergic patients are allergic to mealworm.
Read Anaphylaxis due to oat ingestion.
Read Systemic contact dermatitis--kids and ketchup.
Read Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Fixed eruption due to quinine in tonic water.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Can the presence of cat/dog at home be considered the only criterion of exposure to cat/dog allergens? A likely underestimated bias in clinical practice and in large epidemiological studies.
An important aspect of allergic sensitization to furry animals is the association of dog and cat exposure in early childhood with the incidence of respective allergies later in life. This topic is very controversial, because some authors have found a 'facilitating' effect, while others have noticed a 'protective' or even no significant effect in individuals living in urban areas. It is likely that some biases could be responsible of these contradictory findings. Cat/dog ownership or their presence in indoor environments are considered usually the main criteria to assess the exposure to these pets in studies' questionnaires. Even in clinical practice 'are there animals at home?' is the common query usually done when collecting anamnestic data. In our opinion, these commonly used questions should not be considered the main index of exposure to pet allergens, because they can lead to erroneous interpretation of the clinical significance of positive skin prick tests for pet allergens as well as of the real risk of exposure to allergens of dog/cat in epidemiological studies. Consequently, we suggest a new, more realistic, classification of modalities of exposure to pet allergens in 'real life' based on five possible conditions

Can the presence of cat/dog at home be considered the only criterion of exposure to cat/dog allergens? A likely underestimated bias in clinical practice and in large epidemiological studies.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Calzetta L, Piccolo A, Menna G, Rogliani P.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;48(2):61-64

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Chemical research on red pigments after adverse reactions to tattoo.
Currently, the incidence of tattooing is on the rise compared to the past, especially among adolescents, and it leads to the urgency of monitoring the security status of tattooing centers, as well as to inform people about the risks of tattoo practice. In our clinical experience, 20% of tattooed patients presented adverse reactions, like allergic contact dermatitis, psoriasis with Koebner's phenomena and granulomatous reactions, with the latter most prevalent and most often related to red pigment. Adverse reactions to tattoo pigments, especially the red one, are well known and described in literature. Great attention has to be focused on the pigments used, especially for the presence of new substances, often not well known. For this reason, we decided to perform a study on 12 samples of red tattoo ink, obtained by patients affected by different cutaneous reactions in the site of tattoo, to analyze their chemical composition

Chemical research on red pigments after adverse reactions to tattoo.  
Tammaro A, Toniolo C, Giulianelli V, Serafini M, Persechino S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;48(2):46-48

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A review on emerging frontiers of house dust mite and cockroach allergy research.
Currently, mankind is afflicted with diversified health issues, allergies being a common, yet little understood malady. Allergies, the outcome of a baffled immune system encompasses myriad allergens and causes an array of health consequences, ranging from transient to recurrent and mild to fatal. Indoor allergy is a serious hypersensitivity in genetically-predisposed people, triggered by ingestion, inhalation or mere contact of allergens, of which mite and cockroaches are one of the most-represented constituents. Arduous to eliminate, these aeroallergens pose constant health challenges, mostly manifested as respiratory and dermatological inflammations, leading to further aggravations if unrestrained. Recent times have seen an unprecedented endeavour to understand the conformation of these allergens, their immune manipulative ploys and other underlying causes of pathogenesis, most importantly therapies. Yet a large section of vulnerable people is ignorant of these innocuous-looking immune irritants, prevailing around them, and continues to suffer. This review aims to expedite this field by a concise, informative account of seminal findings in the past few years, with particular emphasis on leading frontiers like genome-wide association studies (GWAS), epitope mapping, metabolomics etc. Drawbacks linked to current approaches and solutions to overcome them have been proposed

A review on emerging frontiers of house dust mite and cockroach allergy research.  
Patel S, Meher BR.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Mar 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Endotypes of Pollen Food Syndrome in Children with Seasonal Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: a molecular classification.
Pollen food syndrome (PFS) is heterogeneous with regard to triggers, severity, natural history, comorbidities and response to treatment. Our study aims to classify different endotypes of PFS based on IgE sensitization to panallergens. This study examined 1271 Italian children (age 4-18y) with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SAR). Foods triggering PFS were acquired by questionnaire. Skin prick tests were performed with commercial pollen extracts. IgE to panallergens: Phl p 12 (profilin), Bet v 1 (PR-10) and Pru p 3 (nsLTP), were tested by ImmunoCAP FEIA. An unsupervised hierarchical agglomerative clustering method was applied within PFS population. PFS was observed in 300/1271 children (24%). Cluster analysis identified five PFS endotypes linked to panallergen IgE sensitization: 1) Co-sensitization to >/=2 panallergens ('multi-panallergen PFS'); 2-4) sensitization to either profilin, or nsLTP, or PR-10 ('mono-panallergen PFS'); 5) no sensitization to panallergens ('no-panallergen PFS'). These endotypes showed peculiar characteristics: 1) 'multi-panallergen PFS': severe disease with frequent allergic comorbidities and multiple offending foods; 2) 'Profilin PFS': OAS triggered by Cucurbitaceae; 3) 'LTP PFS': living in Southern Italy, OAS triggered by hazelnut and peanut; 4) 'PR-10 PFS': OAS triggered by Rosaceae; 5) 'no-panallergen' PFS: mild disease and OAS triggered by kiwifruit .

In a Mediterranean country characterized by multiple pollen exposures, PFS is a complex and frequent complication of childhood SAR, with five distinct endotypes marked by peculiar profiles of IgE sensitization to panallergens. Prospective studies in cohorts of PFS patients are now required to test whetherthis novel classification may be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in the clinical practice.

Endotypes of Pollen Food Syndrome in Children with Seasonal Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: a molecular classification.  
Mastrorilli C, Tripodi S, Caffarelli C, Perna S, Di Rienzo BA, Sfika I, Asero R, Dondi A, Bianchi A, Povesi DC, Ricci G, Cipriani F, Maiello N, Miraglia Del GM, Frediani T, Frediani S, Mac.
Allergy 2016 Mar 21;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The minor house dust mite allergen Der p 13 is a fatty acid binding protein
This study investigated the IgE reactivity of recombinant Der p 13 (rDer p 13), its lipid binding activities and its capacity to stimulate airway epithelium cells. Purified rDer p 13 was characterized. The low IgE binding frequency (7%, n= 224) in Thai HDM-allergic patients as well as the limited propensity to activate basophil degranulation classifies Der p 13 as a minor HDM allergen. Although a minor allergen, Der p 13 may, through its lipid binding capacity, play a role in the initiation of the HDM allergic response through TLR2 activation.

The minor house dust mite allergen Der p 13 is a fatty acid binding protein and an activator of a TLR2-mediated innate immune response.  
Satitsuksanoa P, Kennedy M, Gilis D, Le MM, Suratannon N, Wai TS, Wongpiyabovorn J, Chatchatee P, Vangveravong M, Rerkpattanapipat T, Sangasapaviliya A, Piboonpocanun S, Nony E, Ruxrung.
Allergy 2016 Mar 28;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The lipid-interaction capacity of Sin a 2 and Ara h 1, major mustard and peanut allergens of the cupin superfamily, endorses allergenicity.
Sin a 2 (11S globulin) and Ara h 1 (7S globulin) are major allergens from yellow mustard seeds and peanut, respectively. The ability of these two allergens to interact with lipid components remains unknown. This study evaluated the capacity of Sin a 2 and Ara h 1 to interact with lipid components and the potential effects of such interaction in their allergenic capacity and concluded that Sin a 2 and Ara h 1 interact with lipid components, which might well contribute to explain the potent allergenic capacity of these two clinically relevant allergens belonging to the cupin superfamily.

The lipid-interaction capacity of Sin a 2 and Ara h 1, major mustard and peanut allergens of the cupin superfamily, endorses allergenicity.  
Angelina A, Sirvent S, Palladino C, Vereda A, Cuesta-Herranz J, Eiwegger T, Rodriguez R, Breiteneder H, Villalba M, Palomares O.
Allergy 2016 Mar 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vitro tests for Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions. An ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group Position Paper.
Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, since in vivo tests have suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHR. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

In vitro tests for Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions. An ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group Position Paper.  
Mayorga C, Celik G, Rouzaire P, Whitaker P, Bonadonna P, Cernadas JR, Vultaggio A, Brockow K, Caubet JC, Makowska J, Nakonechna A, Romano A, Montanez MI, Laguna JJ, Zanoni G, Gueant JL, Ou.
Allergy 2016 Mar 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Drug allergies documented in electronic health records of a large healthcare system.
Drug allergy data were obtained from EHRs of patients who visited two large tertiary care hospitals in Boston from 1990 to 2013. Among 1,766,328 patients, 35.4% of patients had at least one reported drug allergy with an average of 1.95 drug allergies per patient. The most commonly reported drug allergies in this population were to penicillins (12.8%), sulfonamide antibiotics (7.4%), opiates (6.8%), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (3.5%). The relative proportion of allergies to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) more than doubled since early 2000s. Drug allergies were most prevalent among females and white patients except for NSAIDs, ACE inhibitors, and Thiazide diuretics, which were more prevalent in black patients.

Drug allergies documented in electronic health records of a large healthcare system.  
Zhou L, Dhopeshwarkar N, Blumenthal KG, Goss F, Topaz M, Slight SP, Bates DW.
Allergy 2016 Mar 10;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.
"We demonstrate that peanut agglutinin, a minor peanut allergen is a novel ligand for DC-SIGN. Peanut agglutinin activates DCs to induce expression of co-stimulatory molecules in vitro. We present a comprehensive report on characterization of DC-SIGN-binding proteins in common allergenic foods like peanut, soy, tree nuts, egg and milk. Foods that rarely induce allergy such as pine nuts, chickpea and corn showed no binding to DC-SIGN. Several DC-SIGN-binding proteins show reactivity in serum IgE-immunoblots. We have also identified novel non-IgE-binding proteins that interact with DC-SIGN; these proteins may be important for regulating immune responses to these foods. "

Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.  
Kamalakannan M, Chang LM, Grishina G, Sampson HA, Masilamani M.
Allergy 2016 Mar 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Incidence and natural history of hen's egg allergy in the first 2 years of life-the EuroPrevall birth cohort study.
The objective of this study was to establish the incidence and course of challenge-confirmed hen's egg allergy (HEA) in children, from birth until the age of 24 months, in different European regions. In the EuroPrevall birth cohort study, children with a suspected HEA and their age-matched controls were evaluated in 9 countries, using a standardized protocol including measurement of HE-specific immunoglobulin E-antibodies in serum, skin prick tests, and double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). Across Europe, 12 049 newborns were enrolled, and 9336 (77.5%) were followed up to 2 years of age. In 298 children, HEA was suspected and DBPCFC was offered. HEA by age two was confirmed in 86 of 172 challenged children (mean raw incidence 0.84%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.67-1.03). Adjusted mean incidence of HEA was 1.23% (95% CI 0.98-1.51) considering possible cases among eligible children who were not challenged. Centre-specific incidence ranged from United Kingdom (2.18%, 95% CI 1.27-3.47) to Greece (0.07%). Half of the HE-allergic children became tolerant to HE within 1 year after the initial diagnosis.

Incidence and natural history of hen's egg allergy in the first 2 years of life-the EuroPrevall birth cohort study.  
Xepapadaki P, Fiocchi A, Grabenhenrich L, Roberts G, Grimshaw KE, Fiandor A, Larco JI, Sigurdardottir S, Clausen M, Papadopoulos NG, Dahdah L, Mackie A, Sprikkelman AB, Schoemaker AA, Du.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):350-357

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE antibodies in relation to prevalence and multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from birth to adolescence.
Eczema, asthma, and rhinitis affect a large proportion of children, but their prevalence varies with age. IgE antibodies are also common in the pediatric population. However, the links between IgE, disease, and trajectories are unclear. The objective of this study was to better understand the links between sensitization and disease, we studied IgE sensitization ever in relation to eczema, asthma, and rhinitis, in children followed up to 16 years of age. From the Swedish population-based birth cohort BAMSE, 2607 children were included. Parental reports from six time points between 1 and 16 years were used to identify children with eczema, asthma, and rhinitis. Blood was collected at 4, 8, and 16 years, and sensitization ever was defined as allergen-specific IgE >/=0.35 kUA /l to common food and/or inhalant allergens at any time point. Fifty-one percent were sensitized at least once up to 16 years. Almost a quarter of ever-sensitized children did not have any disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, sensitization ever was significantly associated with the following: (i) eczema throughout childhood, (ii) multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from 1 to 16 years (OR for multimorbidity: 5.11, 95% CI: 3.99-6.55), (iii) asthma and rhinitis from 4 to 16 years of age. Specific IgE is strongly associated with eczema and allergic multimorbidity throughout childhood and with asthma and rhinitis from age 4 years. However, 23% of the children with IgE sensitization do not develop any disease in childhood

IgE antibodies in relation to prevalence and multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from birth to adolescence.  
Ballardini N, Bergstrom A, Wahlgren CF, van HM, Hallner E, Kull I, Melen E, Anto JM, Bousquet J, Wickman M.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):342-349

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Structural similarities of human and mammalian lipocalins, and their function in innate immunity and allergy.
Owners and their domestic animals via skin shedding and secretions, mutually exchange microbiomes, potential pathogens and innate immune molecules. Among the latter especially lipocalins are multifaceted: they may have an immunomodulatory function and, furthermore, they represent one of the most important animal allergen families. The amino acid identities, as well as their structures by superposition modeling were compared among human lipocalins, hLCN1 and hLCN2, and most important animal lipocalin allergens, such as Can f 1, Can f 2 and Can f 4 from dog, Fel d 4 from cats, Bos d 5 from cow's milk, Equ c 1 from horses, and Mus m 1 from mice, all of them representing major allergens. The beta-barrel fold with a central molecular pocket is similar among human and animal lipocalins. Thereby, lipocalins are able to transport a variety of biological ligands in their highly conserved calyx-like cavity, among them siderophores with the strongest known capability to complex iron (Fe(3+) ). Levels of human lipocalins are elevated in nonallergic inflammation and cancer, associated with innate immunoregulatory functions that critically depend on ligand load. Accordingly, deficient loading of lipocalin allergens establishes their capacity to induce Th2 hypersensitivity. Our similarity analysis of human and mammalian lipocalins highlights their function in innate immunity and allergy

Structural similarities of human and mammalian lipocalins, and their function in innate immunity and allergy.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Pacios LF, Bianchini R, Hofstetter G, Roth-Walter F.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):286-294

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of allergic sensitivity to Acanthamoeba allergen in patients with chronic cough.
Acanthamoeba and their proteins can elicit severe allergic airway inflammation in experimental mice. Acanthamoeba is a genus of amoebae. The authors performed a skin-prick test on 65 patients with chronic cough by using 54 previously known allergens and Acanthamoeba excretory-secretory proteins and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 34 patients to evaluate Acanthamoeba-specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. After skin-prick testing, 29 patients (44.6%) showed positive reactions to one or more common aeroallergens. Acanthamoeba allergenicity was evaluated in 4 of 65 subjects (6.1%). An Acanthamoeba-positive reaction was closely related to several pollen allergens, especially willow tree, poplar, elm, oak, velvet grass, and cockroach. Average levels of Acanthamoeba-specific IgG subtypes in patient serum did not differ compared with healthy subjects; however, Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers of patients were significantly higher than in healthy subjects. IgE antibodies of patients who tested positive in the skin-prick test reacted strongly to the 15 kDa excretory-secretory protein. Moreover, these antigens also reacted with those who tested positive in the skin-prick test to pollens. Taken together, the authors conclude that their results indicated that some patients with allergy showed a positive response to the skin-prick test and that they also have high IgE serum levels. However, further experimental investigation is warranted because our preliminary findings indicated that Acanthamoeba might be a new allergen in humans.

Evaluation of allergic sensitivity to Acanthamoeba allergen in patients with chronic cough.  
Park HK, Park MK, Kim KU, Kang SA, Park SK, Ahn SC, Kim DH, Yu HS.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Mar;37(2):141-147

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The Hidden Culprit: A Case of Repeated Anaphylaxis to Cremophor.
Drug-induced anaphylaxis is a big pitfall in patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. We report a case of lung cancer patient who experienced two near-fatal anaphylactic reactions that resulted from paclitaxel and multivitamin, seperately. Recurrent severe reactions to different agents led to further investigation to which material the patient was hypersensitive. The skin prick test revealed sensitization to cremophor, which is a commonly used emulsifying agent. This case emphasizes the importance of correctly identifying the culprit drug of anaphylaxis to avoid potentially fatal reaction

The Hidden Culprit: A Case of Repeated Anaphylaxis to Cremophor.  
Kim YN, Kim JY, Kim JW, Kim JH, Kim HI, Yune S, Choi DC, Lee BJ.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):174-177

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnostic value of specific IgE to Peanut and Ara h 2 in Korean children with peanut allergy.
Forty-eight children (22 boys and 26 girls) with a suspected peanut allergy were enrolled. The previously established DDP for peanut-sIgE antibodies (14 kU/L) showed a sensitivity of 22.7%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%, and negative predictive value of 60.4% in our study population. The median levels of peanut-sIgE (5.4 kU/L vs 1.1 kU/L, P<0.001) and Ara h 2-sIgE (0.8 kU/L vs 0 kU/L, P<0.001) were significantly higher in the peanut allergy group than in the peanut tolerance group. The peanut-sIgE concentration indicating a PPV of 100% was 10.3 kU/L. The Ara h 2-sIgE level of 4.0 kU/L had a PPV of 100%. These results showed that the cutoff levels for peanut (10.3 kU/L) and Ara h 2 (4.0 kU/L) established in this study is useful for the diagnosis of peanut allergy in Korean children

Diagnostic value of specific IgE to Peanut and Ara h 2 in Korean children with peanut allergy.  
Kim HY, Han Y, Kim K, Lee JY, Kim MJ, Ahn K, Kim J.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):156-160

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The association between serum lead and total immunoglobulin E levels according to allergic sensitization.
A positive association between the serum lead and total IgE levels was statistically significant in subjects with D. farinae sensitization, which indicated that the immunologic effects of lead exposure may be greater in people with allergic sensitization

The association between serum lead and total immunoglobulin E levels according to allergic sensitization.  
Kim JH, Chang JH, Choi HS, Kim HJ, Kang JW.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Mar;30(2):48-52

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms and positive skin-prick test results in patients with dry eye.
This study included 57 patients with dry eye and 48 healthy subjects. The prevalence of allergic symptoms and skin-prick test results were assessed and compared with the control group. With regard to positive reactions to allergens in skin-prick tests, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergy (p = 0.0003), Dermatophagoides farinae allergy (p = 0.0003), grass-mix allergy (p = 0.049), Salicaces allergy (p = 0.006), and Compositae allergy (p = 0.019) were significantly observed to be higher in the group with dry eye. Nasal obstruction (p = 0.027), discharge (p = 0.0001), sneeze (p = 0.0003), itching (p = 0.0001), and postnasal drainage (p = 0.001) symptoms were observed to be significantly higher in the group with dry eye. This study revealed that there was a significant association between dry eye and allergic rhinitis with positive skin-prick test results. There may be a possible link between dry eye and allergy.

Prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms and positive skin-prick test results in patients with dry eye.  
Yenigun A, Dadaci Z, Sahin GO, Elbay A.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Mar;30(2):26-29

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The NPC2 protein: A novel dog allergen.
The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the canine NPC2 protein, a novel dog allergen.Commercial and laboratory-generated aqueous dog extracts were screened with IgE immunoblotting using human serum samples from 71 dog-allergic individuals. A 16-kDa protein in dog allergen extracts was recognized by specific IgE. The protein was identified by sequencing as a CE1 protein or NPC2 protein. Human IgE bound to recombinant protein was expressed in both yeast and bacteria. Ten (14%) of 71 individuals had specific IgE to NPC2 protein from bacteria, and 12 (17%) had IgE to NPC2 protein from yeast. Binding of pooled dog-allergic serum IgE to the dust mite protein Der p 2 was partially inhibited by recombinant NPC2 protein. Therefore NPC2 protein, a member of the MD-2-related lipid recognition family, is identified as a dog allergen (Can f 7), with an apparent seroprevalence of 10% to 20%.

The NPC2 protein: A novel dog allergen.  
Khurana T, Newman-Lindsay S, Young PR, Slater JE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The economic effect and outcome of delaying oral food challenges.
This study assessed the economic effect and outcome of delaying OFCs. A retrospective analysis was performed for peanut, egg, and milk OFCs conducted between 2001 and 2012 at a tertiary food allergy referral center. Delayed OFC was defined as greater than 12 months from the time the sIgE level became less than 2 kUA/L. Time to OFC was explored in association with skin prick test result (wheal size), OFC outcome, and the economic effect of delay. Of 319 challenges, 173 OFCs were delayed (54.2%) by a mean time of 35.5 months (range, 13-123 months) vs a mean time of 4.2 months in the 146 challenges that were not delayed (P < .001). The overall OFC passage rate was 89.9%. There was no association between delayed OFC and history of anaphylaxis, type of allergen, age at OFC, or challenge outcome. Delay in OFC was associated with an estimated mean economic cost of $12,203 per patient ($4,184 per 12 months) and $1,951,487 total (total delay, 5,597 months) in this population.

The economic effect and outcome of delaying oral food challenges.  
Couch C, Franxman T, Greenhawt M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Safety of chitosan processed wine in shrimp allergic patients.
This study aimed to assess the safety of chitosan processed wine in shrimp allergic patients. Adults (18-65 years) with evidence of IgE-mediated sensitization to shrimp and a history of anaphylaxis to shrimp and/or a positive oral challenge result to shrimp were selected. The study found that wine processed with chitosan-based films as a preservative agent may be safely consumed by shrimp allergic individuals. Patients with severe shrimp allergy were selected, and all of them tolerated this wine; consequently, it is unlikely that individuals with a similar history of allergic reactions or mild allergic reactions would react to this type of wine.

Safety of chitosan processed wine in shrimp allergic patients.  
Amaral L, Silva D, Couto M, Nunes C, Rocha SM, Coimbra MA, Coimbra A, Moreira A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 18;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen used to produce allergen extracts.
Both genetic and environmental factors affect the allergenic composition of pollen because it is a biologically active pharmaceutical ingredient obtained from nature. The potential effect of airborne contaminants in pollen requires major attention but can be properly addressed through careful collection practices, combined with a proper interpretation of the data on purity obtained for each pollen lot. The regulations associated with pollen used to manufacture allergen extracts in the United States and Europe and the numbers of pollen allergen extracts commercially available in both areas of the world differ. A critical parameter to select the appropriate extracts for diagnosis and allergen immunotherapy is to understand the phenomenon of cross-reactivity among pollen families, genera, and species. Physicians should be aware of the factors responsible for the qualitative and quantitative composition of pollen allergen extracts and the associated regulations to produce suitable extracts to diagnose and treat allergic diseases. Collaboration and cooperation among allergen manufacturing companies and regulatory agencies are necessary

Pollen used to produce allergen extracts.  
Codina R, Lockey RF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of desert dust exposure on allergic symptoms: A natural experiment in Japan.
Ambient desert dust level was associated with an increased risk of allergic symptoms in pollen-sensitized pregnant women when pollen was present in the air. The risk increase was dose dependent and was observed from low levels of desert dust. These results support a hypothesis that ambient desert dust particles exert adjuvant effects in human in real-life settings.

Effect of desert dust exposure on allergic symptoms: A natural experiment in Japan.  
Kanatani KT, Hamazaki K, Inadera H, Sugimoto N, Shimizu A, Noma H, Onishi K, Takahashi Y, Itazawa T, Egawa M, Sato K, Go T, Ito I, Kurozawa Y, Konishi I, Adachi Y, Nakayama T.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 11;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of wheat sensitization using an in-house wheat extract in Coca-10% alcohol solution in children with wheat anaphylaxis.
Identification of wheat sensitization by a skin prick test (SPT) is essential for children with wheat-induced anaphylaxis, since oral food challenge can cause serious adverse effects. Wheat allergens are both water/salt and alcohol soluble. The preparation of wheat extract for SPT containing both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergen is needed. This study determined if a wheat extract using Coca's solution containing 10% alcohol (Coca-10% EtOH), prepared in-house, contians both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergens. Six children with history of wheat anaphylaxis had positive SPT to both commercial and in-house extracts. They also had different levels of sIgE against wheat and omega-5 gliadin allergens. The results of direct immunoblotting showed all tested sera had sIgE bound to ~35 kDa wheat protein. Further IgE inhibition immunoblotting identified the ~35 kDa wheat protein as gliadin but not gluten allergen. Therefore the in-house prepared Coca-10% EtOH solution could extract both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergens. The ~35 kDa gliadin appears to be a major wheat allergen among tested individuals.

Identification of wheat sensitization using an in-house wheat extract in Coca-10% alcohol solution in children with wheat anaphylaxis.  
Pacharn P, Kumjim S, Tattiyapong P, Jirapongsananuruk O, Piboonpocanun S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cloning and characterization of recombinant tropomyosin of giant freshwater shrimp M. rosenbergii to determine major allergens causing allergic reactions among shrimp-allergic children.
Seawater and freshwater shrimp are some of the most common causes of food allergy among children in Thailand. Tropomyosin has been reported as a major allergen for shrimp allergic populations around the world. Despite a high number of shrimp-allergic Thai children, however, it is unknown whether shrimp tropomyosin is a major cause of allergic reactions. This study cloned and characterized tropomyosin of giant freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) and determined whether this tropomyosin is a major cross-reactive allergen for Thai children with shrimp allergy. The amino acid sequence of Mac r1.0101 showed 2 polymorphic amino acids indicating a variant of tropomyosin. Ten of 13 shrimp-allergic Thai children had serum-specific IgE against Mac r1.0101, but at different levels. Results of the inhibition of specific IgE using Mac r1.0101 showed that 7 of the tested serum samples also had specific IgE against other shrimp allergens in addition to IgE against Mac r1.0101.

Cloning and characterization of recombinant tropomyosin of giant freshwater shrimp M. rosenbergii to determine major allergens causing allergic reactions among shrimp-allergic children.  
Kumjim S, Jirapongsananuruk O, Piboonpocanun S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 20;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergenicity of native and recombinant major allergen groups 1 and 2 of Dermatophagoides mites in mite sensitive Thai patients.
Natural allergenic extracts using for diagnosis and immunotherapy may have batch-to-batch variations and contaminations with unrefined allergens or non-allergenic components. Thus, recombinant allergen is believed to overcome these shortcomings. In this study, native and recombinant allergens of group 1 and 2 of Dermatophagoides mites were produced and their allergenicities were compared. The native and recombinant Der p 1, Der p 2, Der f 1, Der f 2 had molecular weights of approximately 25, 15, 25 and 15 kDa, respectively. IgE reactivities of nDer p 1, nDer f 1, rDer p 1 and rDer f 1 were 96.67%, 90%, 43.33% and 46.67%, respectively. Allergenicities of nDer p 2, nDer f 2, rDer p 2 and rDer f 2 were 86.67%, 96.43%, 76.67% and 89.29%, respectively. The findings indicated that recombinant group-1 products were minor allergens which revealed no correlation with their native forms. In contrast, recombinant group-2 allergens were major allergens and showed a significant correlation to their native allergens.

Allergenicity of native and recombinant major allergen groups 1 and 2 of Dermatophagoides mites in mite sensitive Thai patients.  
Sookrung N, Choopong J, Seesuay W, Indrawattana N, Chaicumpa W, Tungtrongchitr A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;34(1):51-58

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
p-Phenylenediamine exposure in real life - a case-control study on sensitization rate, mode and elicitation reactions in the northern Netherlands.
Background: The prevalence of p-phenylenediamine (PPD) sensitization is 4% in the patch tested population and varies between zero and 1.5% in the general population. Hair dye is a recognised sensitization source. The prevalence rates in the patch tested and general population of The Netherlands are comparable with the prevalence rates of other mid-European centres. PPD sensitization is often attributed to hair dye. However, this study shows that subjects sensitized by black henna tattoos present with very severe elicitation reactions, emphasizing the need for more strict policing the prohibition.

p-Phenylenediamine exposure in real life - a case-control study on sensitization rate, mode and elicitation reactions in the northern Netherlands.  
Vogel TA, Coenraads PJ, Bijkersma LM, Vermeulen KM, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):355-361

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin.
Allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin has been reported only rarely, and only from Japan. A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin in a 61-year-old woman is described. She presented with a 9-month history of pruritic erythema on her cheeks and upper eyelids. Saitama, Japan), which the patient had been using for more than a year, elicited a positive reaction. Additional patch testing was performed with all 18 ingredients of the whitening lotion, and only arbutin (5% pet.) elicited a positive reaction. Arbutin is derived from dried leaves of the berry family. (blueberries, cranberries, bearberries, and most pear plants)

A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin.  
Matsuo Y, Ito A, Masui Y, Ito M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):404-405

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids: evaluation and management.
Corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medications used widely to treat allergic inflammation. Although the endocrine and gastrointestinal side effects of corticosteroids have been described, the occurrence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and delayed contact dermatitis due to corticosteroids remains under-recognized. Hypersensitivity reactions can occur to a corticosteroid itself, or to the additives and vehicles in corticosteroid preparations. Skin testing and oral graded challenge can help confirm the suspected culprit agent in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and help identify an alternative tolerated corticosteroid. Patch testing can help identify the culprit agents in delayed hypersensitivity contact dermatitis. Cross-reactivity patterns have not been observed for immediate hypersensitivity reactions as they have been for delayed contact dermatitis. Sensitization in contact dermatitis exhibits cross-reactivity patterns based on corticosteroid structure. We review the current understanding regarding the clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids

Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids: evaluation and management.  
Otani IM, Banerji A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Mar;16(3):18

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Is advising food allergic patients to avoid food with precautionary allergen labelling out of date?
Purpose of Review: Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) continues to be used by the food manufacturing industry to alert the food allergic consumer that cross-contact may have occurred during the supply chain for ingredients or the manufacturing process. This review will summarize recent evidence regarding use and interpretation of precautionary labels by industry, healthcare professionals, and food allergic consumers. Consumers find precautionary labels difficult to interpret and often distrust them as disclaimers of product liability. It is unclear from a clinician's perspective how healthcare professionals should advise their patients regarding these statements.

Recent Findings: Recent studies suggest that consumers do not always read food labels and that these labels are difficult to interpret and are often distrusted by consumers as disclaimers of liability. There is evidence to suggest that this behaviour occurs in all countries assessed that use PAL. The healthcare professional remains confused about the interpretation and value of the current PAL system as it is unclear whether foods that contain no advisory labels are safe to consume. There is a need for improvement in the value and use of precautionary labelling for allergen risk assessment for allergic consumers.

Summary: New studies have shown the confusion that currently exists in regard to PAL for the healthcare professional and the consumer alike. The studies have also highlighted certain gaps in the literature that, once addressed, will improve the uniformity of PAL and provide the healthcare professional with appropriate advice which they can in turn relay to the allergic consumer. Because of the global supply of food products there is a need for an international approach in improving PAL

Is advising food allergic patients to avoid food with precautionary allergen labelling out of date?  
Zurzolo GA, de Court, Koplin J, Mathai ML, Allen KJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Component-resolved diagnosis in anaphylaxis.
Component-resolved diagnosis (CRD) is an advanced tool capable of aiding the clinician in fine tuning the diagnosis of the causal allergens of a reaction with the added value of providing information of severity risk, potential cross-reactivity, and subsequently, guiding management measures. This review will focus on the advantages of CRD of anaphylaxis in clinical practice. Research is continuously providing insight to which molecules are associated with genuine sensitization and/or potential severity risk for hymenoptera venom (Api m1, Ves v 1, Ves v 5, and Pol d 5), food allergy (seed storage proteins and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins), cofactor-enhanced food allergy (omega-5-gliadine, nonspecific lipid transfer proteins), red meat delayed anaphylaxis (alpha-gal), latex allergy (Hev b 1, Hev b 3, Hev b 5, and Hev b 6), and Anisakis allergy (Ani s 1, Ani s 4, Ani s 7, and Ani s 13); other molecules are primary associated with nonclinically relevant sensitizations, cross-reactivity, or mild reactions (carbohydrate determinants and profilins). New molecules, some minor allergens, are being identified as new potential biomarkers of severity. The usefulness of CRD in anaphylaxis is self-evident, since it improves the recognition of sensitization profiles associated with specific clinical outcomes and provides information to guide further management

Component-resolved diagnosis in anaphylaxis.  
Cardona V, Ansotegui IJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 2;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact dermatitis in saffron workers
Saffron, a bulbous perennial plant belonging to Iridaceae family, is the most expensive cultivated herb that is widely used for industrial and nonindustrial purposes. The aims of this study were to determine the clinical pattern patch-testing profile of contact dermatitis in saffron workers and to identify the most common allergens/sensitizers. One hundred ten saffron workers were patch-tested with 39 allergens, which included Indian standard series antigens, plant series antigens, and extracts from different parts of saffron flower. The allergens in Indian standard series accounted for 52.44% of positive reactions. Plant series and different parts of saffron accounted for 47.56% of the positive reactions. Among those patients with positive responses to the supplemental saffron allergens, 83.3% were of present or past relevance. The data observed in the present study confirm that the saffron dermatitis is a distinct clinical entity with characteristic clinical presentation and has a strong significance as an occupational allergen in those handling this plant. Patch testing with different parts of saffron flower has a role to play in finding out the etiological cause.

Contact dermatitis in saffron workers: clinical profile and identification of contact sensitizers in a saffron-cultivating area of Kashmir Valley of North India.  
Hassan I, Kamili A, Rasool F, Nehvi F, Rather P, Yasmin S, Pampori RA, Jabeen Y, Yaseen A, Bashir S, Naaz S.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):136-141

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.
Polysensitization occurs more often than expected based on chance. Polysensitized patients were more likely to have hand dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis was not significantly associated with polysensitization in this analysis. Polysensitized individuals may represent a phenotype with increased genetic susceptibility to sensitization

Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.  
Gosnell AL, Schmotzer B, Nedorost ST.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):133-135

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cinnamon spice and everything not nice: many features of intraoral allergy to cinnamic aldehyde.
Intraoral allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an uncommonly reported entity. The most commonly implicated allergens are metals that are incorporated into dental appliances. Intraoral ACD to nonmetal allergens is even less frequently described. Cinnamic aldehyde is widely used as a flavoring agent in foods and dentifrices. However, intraoral ACD to cinnamon flavoring agents has only been sporadically reported. In these cases, a variety of sources have been implicated, including candy, chewing gum, mouthwash, lip sunscreen, cinnamon toast, volatile oils, and toothpaste. The clinical presentation of intraoral ACD reactions varies greatly, and as a result, clinicians often do not recognize the diagnosis. Furthermore, because patients are typically unable to provide a list of putative allergens, a high degree of clinical suspicion is required to make the correct diagnosis. We describe several patients with intraoral ACD caused by cinnamon and review the literature associated with this condition.

Cinnamon spice and everything not nice: many features of intraoral allergy to cinnamic aldehyde.  
Isaac-Renton M, Li MK, Parsons LM.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):116-121

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylchloroisothiazolinone/Methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergy.
Methylisothiazolinone (MI) has been used as a sole preservative in multiple cosmetics, household goods, and toiletries. A current epidemic of MI has recently been reported in Europe. The aim of this study was to study the prevalence of methylchloroisothiazolinone/MI (MCI/MI) and MI allergy in a Bangkok dermatology clinic. 3253 consecutive patients tested with 0.01% MCI/MI and patients tested with 0.2% MI were included in the study. Three hundred twenty of 3253 patients (9.8%) tested for MCI/MI had a positive reaction. There was a steep increase in the prevalence of MCI/MI contact allergy from 4.8% in 2009 to 11.2% in 2011 and 17% in 2013. In the first 6 months of 2014, 22 of 54 cases tested for MI (40.7%) had a positive reaction. Among those who had a positive reaction to MI, 6 of 22 (27.3%) showed negative reaction to MCI/MI.

Methylchloroisothiazolinone/Methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergy.  
Puangpet P, Chawarung A, McFadden JP.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):99-102

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patch testing custom isocyanate materials from the workplace.
This study concludes that because of the high proportion of reactions (27%), we recommend the use of custom testing to workplace isocyanate products as a supplement to current standard patch testing procedures.

Patch testing custom isocyanate materials from the workplace.  
Burrows D, Houle MC, Holness DL, DeKoven J, Skotnicki S.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):94-98

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oral allergy syndrome (pollen-food allergy syndrome).
Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) or pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFS) is a hypersensitivity reaction to plant-based foods, manifesting most commonly with pruritus of the lips, tongue, and mouth. Unlike simple food allergy, OAS requires prior sensitization to a cross-reacting inhalant allergen rather than direct sensitization to a specific food protein. In this review, we summarize the clinical features and pathophysiology of OAS and provide an overview of known pollen-food associations

Oral allergy syndrome (pollen-food allergy syndrome).  
Price A, Ramachandran S, Smith GP, Stevenson ML, Pomeranz MK, Cohen DE.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):78-88

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Gold contact allergy: clues and controversies.
In 2001, gold was named Contact Allergen of the Year. More than a decade later, we continue to face several challenges in defining the role of gold in contact allergy. First, interpretation of gold reactions in the setting of epicutaneous patch testing may be difficult; in addition to being a common irritant, gold may be associated with significantly delayed and persistent reactions. Second, although gold compounds are commonly positive on patch testing, clinical relevance is relatively low and may be challenging to determine. Third, the complex interplay between gold and the human body is still poorly understood. In this review, we provide an overview of the literature concerning gold patch test positivity and present recommendations for epicutaneous patch testing with gold

Gold contact allergy: clues and controversies.  
Chen JK, Lampel HP.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):69-77

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from jewelry from a non-nickel directive country.
This study aimed to investigate nickel and cobalt release from jewelry available in Thai marketplaces and to study the factors associated with nickel and cobalt release. Five hundred fifty-one items, including belt buckles, bracelets, earrings, necklaces, rings, and watches, were tested; 216 (39.2%) gave positive dimethylglyoxime tests, and 206 (37.4%) gave positive cobalt tests. The factors that determined nickel or cobalt release were shopping location and jewelry price. Cobalt-containing jewelry could be identified by its dark color.

Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from jewelry from a non-nickel directive country.  
Boonchai W, Maneeprasopchoke P, Suiwongsa B, Kasemsarn P.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):44-48

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Nickel and cobalt release from children's toys purchased in Denmark and the United States.
The aim of this study was to evaluate nickel and cobalt release from children's toys. Researchers purchased 212 toys in 18 different retail and online stores in the United States and Denmark. Nickel and cobalt release was tested using the dimethylglyoxime and cobalt screening spot tests. A total of 73 toys (34.4%) released nickel, and none released cobalt. Toys are a commonly overlooked source of nickel exposure and sensitization. Therefore, dermatologists, allergists, and pediatricians should consider the role of toys in their evaluation of children with dermatitis, and the parents of children with positive nickel patch test reactions should be told that toys may release nickel and be a potential chemical source in the manifestation of allergic contact dermatitis.

Nickel and cobalt release from children's toys purchased in Denmark and the United States.  
Jensen P, Hamann D, Hamann CR, Jellesen MS, Jacob SE, Thyssen JP.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):356-365

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patch testing in children from 2005 to 2012: results from the North American contact dermatitis group.
This is a retrospective analysis of children patch-tested with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 65- or 70-allergen series. A total of 883 children were tested during the study period. A percentage of 62.3% had >/=1 positive patch test and 56.7% had >/=1 relevant positive patch test. Frequencies of positive patch test and relevant positive patch test reaction were highest with nickel sulfate (28.1/25.6), cobalt chloride (12.3/9.1), neomycin sulfate (7.1/6.6), balsam of Peru (5.7/5.5), and lanolin alcohol 50% petrolatum vehicle (5.5/5.1). The >/=1 positive patch test and >/=1 relevant positive patch test in the children did not differ significantly from adults (>/=19 years) or from previously tested children (2001-2004). The percentage of clinically relevant positive patch tests for 27 allergens differed significantly between the children and adults. A total of 23.6% of children had a relevant positive reaction to at least 1 supplemental allergen.

Patch testing in children from 2005 to 2012: results from the North American contact dermatitis group.  
Zug KA, Pham AK, Belsito DV, DeKoven JG, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF, Fransway AF, Maibach HI, Marks JG, Mathias CG, Pratt MD, Sasseville D, Storrs FJ, Taylor JS, Warshaw EM, Zirwas MJ.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):345-355

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents
Sunscreen is a key component in the preventive measures recommended by dermatologists and public health campaigns aimed at reducing sunburn, early skin aging, and skin cancer. To maximize compliance, adverse reactions to sunscreens should be minimized. Although inactive ingredients cause many of these reactions, it is important for dermatologists to be aware of reactions to active ultraviolet filters. There are approximately 120 chemicals that can function as ultraviolet (UV) filters. This review focuses on the 36 most common filters in commercial and historical use. Of these, 16 are approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration. The benzophenones and dibenzoylmethanes are the most commonly implicated UV filters causing allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) reactions; benzophenone-3 is the leading allergen and photoallergen within this class. When clinically indicated, patch and photopatch testing should be performed to common UV filters.

Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents: epidemiology, responsible irritants and allergens, clinical characteristics, and management.  
Heurung AR, Raju SI, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):289-326

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.
Fragrances are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in Europe and in North America. They can affect individuals at any age and elicit a spectrum of reactions from contact urticaria to systemic contact dermatitis. Growing recognition of the widespread use of fragrances in modern society has fueled attempts to prevent sensitization through improved allergen identification, labeling, and consumer education. This review provides an overview and update on fragrance allergy. Part 1 discusses the epidemiology and evaluation of suspected fragrance allergy. Part 2 reviews screening methods, emerging fragrance allergens, and management of patients with fragrance contact allergy. This review concludes by examining recent legislation on fragrances and suggesting potential additions to screening series to help prevent and detect fragrance allergy.

Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.  
Cheng J, Zug KA.
Dermatitis 2014 Sep;25(5):232-245

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.
An observational study in 45 pizza makers was performed. 13.3% of the enrolled pizza makers (6/45) presented hand eczema, and that 8.9% (4/45) were affected by occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diallyl disulfide and ammonium persulfate were the responsible substances.

Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.  
Lembo S, Lembo C, Patruno C, Balato A, Balato N, Ayala F.
Dermatitis 2014 Jul;25(4):191-194

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergies can be detected by 200 ppm of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone patch test concentration.
This study concludes that for a correct diagnosis of MCI/MI and MI contact allergies, the authors advocate increasing the MCI/MI patch test concentration to 200 ppm along with a temporal inclusion of MI in the North American Contact Dermatitis Group baseline series.

Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergies can be detected by 200 ppm of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone patch test concentration.  
Leiva-Salinas M, Frances L, Marin-Cabanas I, Bouret AM, Silvestre JF.
Dermatitis 2014 May;25(3):130-134

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergens in oral antihistamines.
Ingestion of antihistamines could precipitate a systemic contact dermatitis in a patient sensitized to an allergen present as an excipient in the medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of common contact allergens among the excipients of oral antihistamines available in this country. The complete ingredient lists of 2119 different preparations of 12 oral antihistamines from the National Library of Medicine data bank was assessed. More than half the formulations (55.0%) contained at least 1 member of the 10 allergen families assessed. Most brompheniramine and doxepin preparations included potentially allergenic excipients, whereas fexofenadine was most often free of them. Sorbitan group members, azo dyes, and propylene glycol were the allergens found most frequently in the antihistamines, each present in over 25% of the products. Elixirs, liquids, solutions, suspensions, and syrups were more likely than nonchewable caplets, capsules, and tablets to contain the allergens tabulated (100% vs 39.3%, respectively). Chewable pills frequently contained azo dyes.

Contact allergens in oral antihistamines.  
Enery-Stonelake M, Silvestri DL.
Dermatitis 2014 Mar;25(2):83-88

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Concomitant patch test reactions to mercapto mix and mercaptobenzothiazole: retrospective analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994-2008.
Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and mercapto compounds are primarily used in rubber products. This study aimed to examine concomitant-positive rates of MBT (1% pet) and the 4-part mercapto mix (MM) (1% pet). A total of 30,880 patients were patch tested to MM and MBT. There were 333 positive reactions to MM and 427 positive reactions to MBT. Ninety-eight patients were positive to MM alone, 192 to MBT alone, and 235 reacted to both. Forty-five percent (192/427) of MBT reactions would have been missed by only testing to MM, and 29% (98/333) of MM reactions would have been missed by testing to MBT alone. Most of these 'missed' reactions, however, were doubtful (+/-) or mild (+) (MBT, 65%; MM, 78%), whereas most reactions in patients who reacted to both were moderate (++) and/or strong (+++) (52.3%). Gloves were the most common source.

Concomitant patch test reactions to mercapto mix and mercaptobenzothiazole: retrospective analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994-2008.  
Warshaw EM, Raju SI, Mathias CG, DeKoven JG, Belsito DV, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, Zug KA, Zirwas MJ, Fowler JF, DeLeo VA, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ.
Dermatitis 2013 Nov;24(6):321-327

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oat and wheat as contact allergens in personal care products.
Immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to oat and wheat in personal care products have been reported in previous studies, and most of those cases were patients with AD. Patch testing with oat and wheat proteins should be performed more frequently, especially in atopic children.

Oat and wheat as contact allergens in personal care products.  
Pootongkam S, Nedorost S.
Dermatitis 2013 Nov;24(6):291-295

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patch testing for drugs.
A review of current literature was performed on the available evidence of patch testing for drugs. This review addresses the use of patch testing for specific cutaneous adverse drug reactions and for specific classes of drugs including antimicrobials, anticonvulsants, antiretrovirals, glucocorticoids, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In addition, the approach to performing patch testing to drugs in the clinical arena as well as current contraindications for drug patch testing is reviewed

Patch testing for drugs.  
Aquino MR, Sher J, Fonacier L.
Dermatitis 2013 Sep;24(5):205-214

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The relevance of 7-day patch test reading.
This study concludes that these results confirm findings in the literature and support the argument for performing a day 7 reading (168 hours) to identify relevant late positive reactions

The relevance of 7-day patch test reading.  
Higgins E, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2013 Sep;24(5):237-240

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergic contact dermatitis and the effect of patch test concentration.
This study reviewed our department's cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by MCI/MI, outlining their clinical presentation and possible sources of sensitization. The effect of changing the concentration of MCI/MI from 0.01% to 0.02% in the British Society for Cutaneous Allergy baseline series was also measured. Twenty-one patients (2.2%) had positive reactions to MCI/MI. Of patients tested to 0.02% MCI/MI, 3.8% had a positive reaction compared with 1.6% of those tested to MCI/MI 0.01%. The authors recommend that 0.02% MCI/MI should be used in baseline series.

Methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergic contact dermatitis and the effect of patch test concentration.  
Higgins E, Kirby B, Rogers S, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2013 Mar;24(2):73-76

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic reactions to insect secretions.
Some products derived from insects can induce allergic reactions. The main characteristics of some products from honeybees, cochineal and silkworms are summarised here. This paper reviews allergic reactions from honey-derived products (propolis, wax, royal jelly), from cochineal products (shellac and carmine) and from silk : clinical features, allergological investigations and allergens if they are known

Allergic reactions to insect secretions.  
Pecquet C.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 Nov;23(6):767-773

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of jellyfish.
A 32-year-old Japanese female, who developed anaphylaxis after eating salt-preserved jellyfish. She had frequently been stung by jellyfish. Thirty minutes after eating salted jellyfish, she showed wheals and oral stinging sensation and 60 minutes later when she was dancing the hula, she showed an asthma-like attack, hypotension, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Prick-to-prick test for the salted jellyfish produced a positive reaction as strong as that induced by histamine. Immunoblot analysis revealed that IgE antibodies in the patient serum reacted with an approximately 200 kDa protein in extracts from tentacle and umbrella of living jellyfish and in extract from the salted jellyfish, as well as a 25 kDa protein only in extracts from living jellyfish. This patient is considered to be the first reported case of anaphylaxis caused by intake of jellyfish.

Anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of jellyfish.  
Imamura K, Tsuruta D, Tsuchisaka A, Mori T, Ohata C, Furumura M, Hashimoto T.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 May;23(3):392-395

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Proven Non-beta-Lactam antibiotic allergy in children.
Patients with suspected NBL allergy were assessed between 2011 and 2015. Characteristics of the reactions and results of skin and drug provocation tests (DPTs) were recorded. In total, 96 patients aged 75.15 +/- 56.77 months (range: 3-208) were assessed. Clarithromycin (63.6%) was the most common cause of reactions reported. After ingestion of NBL antibiotics, maculopapular rash, urticaria/angioedema and anaphylaxis presented in 48.9, 40.7 and 10.4% of the patients, respectively. Tests were performed in 85 patients. Intradermal tests were positive in 3 patients (clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole) and DPT was positive in 1 patient (clarithromycin). Eleven patients could not be tested. Seven patients had severe anaphylaxis, and 4 patients with urticaria/angioedema had to take their medications at the time of the reaction so desensitization was performed. When only patients confirmed by tests were evaluated, NBL allergy was 4.7% (4/85) in our study group. However, when patients who could not be tested, but were regarded as suffering from drug hypersensitivity according to clinical findings, were included, the frequency of NBL allergy was 15.6% (15/96). Most of the children with suspected NBL do not have true hypersensitivity. The frequency of confirmed hypersensitivity is low, and thus a detailed history should be taken from patients with suspected NBL hypersensitivity and DPTs should be performed in patients without contraindications

Proven Non-beta-Lactam antibiotic allergy in children.  
Guvenir H, Dibek ME, Capanoglu M, Vezir E, Toyran M, Kocabas CN.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):45-50

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunological characterization of Dutch sesame seed-allergic patients.
The aim of this study was the immunological characterization of Dutch sesame seed-allergic patients and evaluation of cross-reactivity between sesame seed, tree nut and pollen allergens using different sources of allergen extracts. Six patients with a medical history of sesame seed allergy were included, i.e. 5 with an anaphylactic reaction and 1 with an oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Oleosin was identified as the major allergen for the 5 patients with an anaphylactic reaction to sesame seed, but no cross-reactivity between sesame and tree nut proteins was observed. For the patient with OAS, IgE specific to oleosin was not detected but cross-reactivity between sesame seed and tree nut proteins was observed. The BAT and ImmunoCAP inhibition test added value to the clinical and immunological characterization of sesame seed-sensitized patients, distinguishing relevant and non-relevant sensitizations.

Immunological characterization of Dutch sesame seed-allergic patients.  
Teodorowicz M, Terlouw RJ, Jansen A, Savelkoul HF, Ruinemans-Koerts J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):13-22

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Adverse Reaction to Omalizumab in Patients with Chronic Urticaria: Flare Up or Ineffectiveness?
Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized anti-Ig E monoclonal antibody used as the third line treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). We report four patients with severe antihistamine-resistant CSU, who developed angioedema, anaphylaxis and/or flare up of urticaria at different times following omalizumab therapy

Adverse Reaction to Omalizumab in Patients with Chronic Urticaria: Flare Up or Ineffectiveness?  
Ertas R, Ozyurt K, Yildiz S, Ulas Y, Turasan A, Avci A.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;15(1):82-86

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The complexities of early peanut introduction for the practicing allergist.
Recommendations for the timing of introducing major food allergens, such as peanut, into the diet of at-risk infants have undergone major changes in the past decade. The most substantial modification has been a shift toward advice that delaying beyond 4 to 6 months does not prevent and might actually increase the risk of food allergy. The Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) study published last year provided strong evidence that early peanut introduction with regular ingestion has a potentially dramatic benefit. Although there is little current doubt of the effectiveness of early peanut introduction, many unanswered questions remain. Previous guidelines defined infants at risk as those with a first-degree relative with allergic disease, whereas the LEAP study defined high risk as severe eczema or egg allergy. The LEAP study chose to screen infants but did not have a comparison group randomized without screening. In the following case-based discussion, we explore the complexities of LEAP implementation for the practicing allergist. These include nonuniformity in the literature for defining at-risk infants, difficulties in assessing eczema severity objectively, variable adherence to current guidelines, proposed peanut screening methods contrasting with existing food allergy guidelines to not routinely screen before ingestion, unclear interpretation of positive test results if screened, risks of screening extending to foods not studied in the LEAP study, and uncertainties about the optimal dose and duration of peanut once introduced

The complexities of early peanut introduction for the practicing allergist.  
Greenhawt MJ, Fleischer DM, Atkins D, Chan ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):221-225

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical management of psychosocial concerns related to food allergy.
Current estimates indicate that 4% to 8% of children in the United States are diagnosed with food allergy, and more than 40% of US children with food allergy experience severe allergic reactions. Families trying to avoid foods that may trigger an allergic reaction and ensure adequate treatment of allergic reactions that do occur face numerous challenges. The rise in the number of children diagnosed with food allergies underscores the importance of food allergy-related interventions to address elevated psychosocial concerns, such as parenting stress, anxiety, and worries about bullying. This review provides an overview of common psychosocial concerns among children with food allergy and their families across the developmental spectrum, and offers guidance to medical providers regarding the identification and treatment of food allergy-related psychosocial challenges

Clinical management of psychosocial concerns related to food allergy.  
Herbert L, Shemesh E, Bender B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):205-213

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Exposure and health effects of fungi on humans.
We reviewed recent articles focused on fungal exposure and dampness as risk factors for respiratory disease development, symptoms, and hypersensitivity. In particular, we reviewed the evidence suggesting that early exposure to dampness or fungi is associated with the development of asthma and increased asthma morbidity. Although outdoor exposure to high concentrations of spores can cause health effects such as asthma attacks in association with thunderstorms, most people appear to be relatively unaffected unless they are sensitized to specific genera. Indoor exposure and dampness, however, appears to be associated with an increased risk of developing asthma in young children and asthma morbidity in individuals who have asthma. These are important issues because they provide a rationale for interventions that might be considered for homes and buildings in which there is increased fungal exposure. In addition to rhinitis and asthma, fungus exposure is associated with a number of other illnesses including allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses, allergic fungal sinusitis, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Additional research is necessary to establish causality and evaluate interventions for fungal- and dampness-related health effects

Exposure and health effects of fungi on humans.  
Baxi SN, Portnoy JM, Larenas-Linnemann D, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar 3;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.
These data demonstrate a rate of cross-reactivity between aminopenicillins and aminocephalosporins (ie, cephalexin, cefaclor, and cefadroxil) of around 20%, as well as the absence of cross-reactivity between penicillins and cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam in all subjects with T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins, almost exclusively aminopenicillins. Therefore these subjects could be treated with cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. In those who especially require cephalosporin or aztreonam treatment, however, we recommend pretreatment skin tests because negative responses indicate tolerability

Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.  
Romano A, Gaeta F, Valluzzi RL, Maggioletti M, Caruso C, Quaratino D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 23;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Is microarray analysis really useful and sufficient to diagnose nut allergy in the Mediterranean area?
This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a commercial protein microarray in the determination of specific IgE (sIgE) in peanut, hazelnut, and walnut allergy. sIgE was measured in 36 peanut-allergic, 36 hazelnut-allergic, and 44 walnut-allergic patients by ISAC 112, and subsequently, sIgE against available components was determined by ImmunoCAP in patients with negative ISAC results. ImmunoCAP was also used to measure sIgE to Ara h 9, Cora 8, and Jug r 3 in a subgroup of lipid transfer protein (LTP)-sensitized nut-allergic patients (positive skin prick test to LTP-enriched extract). sIgE levels by ImmunoCAP were compared with ISAC ranges. Most peanut-, hazelnut-, and walnut-allergic patients were sensitized to the corresponding nut LTP (Ara h 9, 66.7%; Cor a 8, 80.5%; Jug r 3, 84% respectively). However, ISAC did not detect sIgE in 33.3% of peanut-allergic patients, 13.9% of hazelnut-allergic patients, or 13.6% of walnut-allergic patients. sIgE determination by ImmunoCAP detected sensitization to Ara h 9, Cor a 8, and Jug r 3 in, respectively, 61.5% of peanut-allergic patients, 60% of hazelnut-allergic patients, and 88.3% of walnut-allergic patients with negative ISAC results. In the subgroup of peach LTP-sensitized patients, Ara h 9 sIgE was detected in more cases by ImmunoCAP than by ISAC (94.4% vs 72.2%, P < .05). Similar rates of Cora 8 and Jug r 3 sensitization were detected by both techniques.

Therefore the diagnostic performance of ISAC was adequate for hazelnut and walnut allergy but not for peanut allergy. sIgE sensitivity against Ara h 9 in ISAC needs to be improved.

Is microarray analysis really useful and sufficient to diagnose nut allergy in the Mediterranean area?  
Goikoetxea MJ, D'Amelio CM, Martinez-Aranguren R, Gamboa P, Garcia BE, Gomez F, Fernandez J, Bartra J, Parra A, Alvarado MI, Alonso MI, Gonzalez E, Terrados S, Moya C, Blanca N, Feo-Brito.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016;26(1):31-39

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.
Regulators and risk managers in general need to decide whether an allergenic food or ingredient is of such public health importance that it needs to be actively managed. There is therefore a need to scale the relative allergenicity of foods and ingredients according to the hazards they pose. Objective criteria increase transparency and trust in this decision-making process and its conclusions. This paper proposes a framework that allows categorisation and prioritisation of allergenic foods according to their public health importance. The challenge is to find a basis on which the allergenicity of foods can best be described and a method to combine the relevant measures of allergenicity into a scoring system that prioritises allergenic foods on the basis of their public health relevance. The framework is designed in accordance with the generic risk analysis principles used in food safety and can be used by regulators to decide whether or not a specific allergenic food or ingredient is of sufficient public health importance that it warrants regulation (i.e. mandatory labelling) when used in the production of food products.

Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.  
Houben G, Burney P, Chan C-H, Crevel R, Dubois A, Faludi R, Klein Entinka R, Knulst A, Taylor S, Ronsmans S.
Miscellaneous Food Chem Tox 2016;89:8-18.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Matrix effect on baked egg tolerance in children with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy.
This study evaluate the influence of wheat matrix and the effects of little standardized cooking procedures on baked egg tolerance. 54 children with IgE-HEA were enrolled. They underwent prick by prick (PbP) tests and open oral food challenges (OFC) performed with baked HE within a wheat matrix (a home-made cake, locally called ciambellone), baked HE without a wheat matrix (in a form of an omelette, locally named frittata) and boiled HE. Three months after passing ciambellone OFC, parents were asked to answer a survey. 88% of children tolerated ciambellone, 74% frittata, 56% boiled HE. Negative predictive value of PbP performed with ciambellone, frittata and boiled HE was 100%. No IgE-mediated adverse reactions were detected at follow-up carried out by the survey. Therefore wheat matrix seemed to be relevant only in few cases. If our results will be confirmed by larger studies, a negative PbP with ciambellone, frittata or boiled HE will allow patients with IgE-HEA to eat these foods without undergoing OFC. Moreover, our study showed that very strict standardized cooking procedures do not seem to be essential, in order to guarantee tolerance towards baked HE.

Matrix effect on baked egg tolerance in children with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy.  
Miceli SS, Greco M, Cuomo B, Bianchi A, Liotti L, Monaco S, Dello I.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 28;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10 years experience in allergy work-up.
Non-immediate reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics (BL) occur more than one hour after drug administration and the most common manifestations are maculopapular exanthemas and delayed-appearing urticaria and/or angioedema. A diagnostic work-up should be performed in all children with non-immediate reactions to BL, in order to remove a false label of hypersensitivity. Even though only 57 (5.5%) of 1,026 children displayed positive responses to delayed-reading intradermal tests to BL, such tests appear to be useful in order to reduce the risk for positive DPTs.

Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10 years experience in allergy work-up.  
tanaskovic-Markovic M, Gaeta F, Medjo B, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M, Velickovic TC, Tmusic V, Romano A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 21;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence and cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity in the first ten years of life.
A birth cohort born on the Isle of Wight (UK) between 2001-2002 was followed up prospectively. Children were clinically examined and skin prick tested at set times and invited for food challenges when indicated. At 10 years of age, children were also invited for a blood test. 969 children were recruited at 12 weeks pregnancy and 92.9%, 88.5%, 91.6% and 85.3% were assessed at one, two, three and ten years. Prevalence of sensitisation to any allergen over 10 years was 186/969 (19.2%; 95% CI: 16.84-21.8) and 108/969 (11.2%; 95% CI: 9.31-13.29) children were sensitised to at least one predefined food allergen. Excluding wheat (due to cross reactivity with pollen), 40/969 (4.1%; 95% CI: 3.19 - 5.32) children were sensitised to a predefined food allergen. Using food challenges and/or a good clinical history, the cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity (FHS) in the first decade of life was 64/947 (6.8%, 95% CI: 5.2-8.4), while the prevalence of FHS at 10 years was 30/827 (3.6%, 95% CI: 2.54-5.15). The vast majority, 25/827 (3.0%, 95% CI: 1.8 - 4.2) suffered from IgE mediated food allergy, while 5/827 (0.6%, 95% CI: 0.07 - 1.3) had non-IgE mediate food allergy/food intolerance.

Conclusions: By the age of ten years 6.8% of children suffered from FHS based on food challenges and a good clinical history. There was a large discrepancy between reported and diagnosed FHS.

Prevalence and cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity in the first ten years of life.  
Venter C, Patil V, Grundy J, Glasbey G, Twiselton R, Arshad SH, Dean T.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 21;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheat protein recognition pattern in tolerant and allergic children.
This study addressed the question whether the IgE recognition pattern between wheat allergic (WA) and clinically tolerant (WT) children differs in order to identify individual proteins useful for component-resolved diagnostics. Sera of 106 children with suspected wheat allergy, of whom 44 children had clinical relevant wheat allergy and 62 were tolerant upon oral food challenge, were analyzed for wheat-specific IgE using the ImmunoCap system as well as immunoblots against water and salt soluble, and water-insoluble protein fractions. 40 randomly selected sera were analyzed for specific IgE to omega5-gliadin. Sixty-three percent of the WT and 86% of the WA children were sensitized to wheat with >0.35 kUA /l in ImmunoCAP analysis. We could confirm the role of alpha-, ss-, gamma-, and omega-gliadins, and LMW glutenin subunits as major allergens and found also IgE binding to a broad spectrum of water- and salt-soluble protein bands. It is of great importance that wheat allergic and tolerant patients showed IgE binding to the same protein bands. WT and WA did not significantly differ in levels of omega5-gliadin-specific IgE. Children with challenge proven clinical relevant food allergy and tolerant ones had a similar spectrum of IgE binding to the same protein bands. These findings imply that component-resolved diagnostics might not be helpful in the diagnostic work-up of wheat allergy.

Wheat protein recognition pattern in tolerant and allergic children.  
Sievers S, Rawel HM, Ringel KP, Niggemann B, Beyer K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;27(2):147-155

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitivity and specificity of prick skin test with two concentrations of standardized extract of Culex quinquefasciatus in allergic children.
In Cuba, IgE-mediated reactions are frequently related to Culex quinquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) bite. This study determined the sensitivity and specificity of skin prick test with two doses of standardized extract in nitrogen protein units (PNU of Culex quinquefasciatus (BIOCEN, Cuba). SPT with the highest concentration obtained a mean wheal size of 22.09 mm2 and for lower doses of 8.09 mm2. Positive skin test correlated in 100% of patients with the presence of specific IgE. Testing with both doses showed a 94% of specificity and 88% of sensitivity.

Sensitivity and specificity of prick skin test with two concentrations of standardized extract of Culex quinquefasciatus in allergic children. [Spanish]  
Castro-Almarales RL, varez-Castello M, Ronquillo-Diaz M, Rodriguez-Canosa JS, Gonzalez-Leon M, Navarro-Viltre BI, Betancourt-Mesia D, Enriquez-Dominguez I, Reyes-Zamora MC, Oliva-Di.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):11-19

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In silico analysis of the identity of lipocalin of dog, cat, horse, cow, hamster and hen.
Lipocalins seem to explain the cross-reactivity between some pets such as cat and dog. However, its role in other animals and its possible clinical impact in allergy diseases have been scarcely studied. This study analyzed by bioinformatics techniques, the identity between lipocalin of some animals and to explore the clinical impact on allergic diseases. Identities between sequences were 10% to 70%. The highest values were found with Can f 6-Fel d 4 (68%) and Fel d 4-Equ c 1 (68%). The lower identity was found with lipocalin porpurin and retinol binding (<20%). Lipocalins as Can f 6, Fel de 4 and Equ c 1 seem to play an important role in the cross-reactivity to cat, horse and dog but not for the co-sensitization to hamster, cow or birds. Fel de 4 and Equ c 1 could be a prevalent allergen for horse and cat.

In silico analysis of the identity of lipocalin of dog, cat, horse, cow, hamster and hen. Possible role in allergic diseases. [Spanish]  
Sanchez A, Cardona R, Sanchez J.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):1-10

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of late-onset anaphylaxis to fermented soybeans (natto).
It has recently been reported that natto sometimes causes IgE-mediated late-onset anaphylaxis, which is characterized by an anaphylaxis reaction occuring approximately half a day after ingestion. It is hypothesized that poly-gamma-glutamic acid, a high-molecular-weight, biodegradable polymer produced by Bacillus subtilis, delays the release of the antigen into the bowel, which delays the reaction. Direct injection of the antigen into tissue by the prickprick test evokes quick positive reaction. A case of late-onset anaphylaxis to natto is reported in a 26-year-old male with two recent episodes of anaphylaxis. The first episode occurred around 10 am with the patient suddenly presenting urticarial rashes all over the body with severe dyspnea and hypotension. A detailed medical history revealed that he had had natto at breakfast, more than 7 hours before the second anaphylaxis occurred. A prickprick test was performed with natto. This induced pruritus and wheal within 15 min after the test, with a score of 4+. A prickprick test and provocation test with tonyu, another soybean product, was negative. The serum IgE level specific for soybeans was also negative.

A case of late-onset anaphylaxis to fermented soybeans (natto).  
Honda T, Michigami M, Miyachi Y, Kabashima K.
J Dermatol 2014 Oct;41(10):940-941

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis due to carrots.
Allergic contact dermatitis due to carrots in a 46-year-old man. He had pruritic erythema and swelling with serous papules on his hands on the day after he cooked with potatoes, carrots and onions, and ate the dish. The eruptions worsened and he seen 2 days after onset. He had no eruptions around his mouth and no symptoms. Patch testing was performed using potatoes, carrots and onions. Positive reactions (+ +) occurred with carrots. To identify the exact allergen, further patch testing was carried out with a-pinene, d-limonene, oil of rosemary, and oil of eucalyptus, all of which have allergic fragrant components common to carrots. All of these materials showed negative reactions. Patch testing was performed with celery, parsley, and ivy, all of which include falcarinol, which is also found in carrot. Positive reactions (+) were found for all samples of celery, parsley, and ivy (as is). Therefore, allergic contact dermatitis due to common components of carrot, celery, parsley, and ivy including falcarinol was diagnosed.

Allergic contact dermatitis due to carrots.  
Kawai M, Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Hagura A, Masuda K, Katoh N.
J Dermatol 2014 Aug;41(8):753-754

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Study of the usefulness of patch testing and use test to predict the safety of commercial topical drugs.
The aim of the present study was to examine the reproducibility of PT and its usefulness in assessing the safety of topical drugs. A total of 55 topical drugs were applied to the backs of two groups of subjects for either 24 or 48 h, and skin irritant reactions were graded at 2 and 24 h after patch removal. For the repeat open application test, six topical drugs with different irritation scores were applied to the arms of two groups of subjects twice daily for 3 weeks, and local symptoms were recorded. The mean irritation scores were similar between the two PT groups. The percentage of subjects positive for symptoms provoked by the use tests was similar between the two groups. The mean irritation scores 24 h after patch removal correlated with the skin symptoms provoked by the use test. PT was reproducible and the results correlated with the use test results. PT is a useful method for evaluating the safety of commercial topical drugs.

Study of the usefulness of patch testing and use test to predict the safety of commercial topical drugs.  
Horita K, Tanoue C, Yasoshima M, Ohtani T, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2014 Jun;41(6):505-513

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Can the presence of cat/dog at home be considered the only criterion of exposure to cat/dog allergens? A likely underestimated bias in clinical practice and in large epidemiological studies.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Calzetta L, Piccolo A, Menna G, Rogliani P.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;48(2):61-64
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Chemical research on red pigments after adverse reactions to tattoo.  
Tammaro A, Toniolo C, Giulianelli V, Serafini M, Persechino S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;48(2):46-48
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A review on emerging frontiers of house dust mite and cockroach allergy research.  
Patel S, Meher BR.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Mar 16;
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Major allergen from Amaranthus palmeri pollen is a profilin: Isolation, partial characterisation and IgE recognition.  
Landa-Pineda CM, rroyo-Becerra A, Rosas-Alvarado A, Teran LM, Garcia-Cruz ML, Marchat LA, Reyes-Lopez CA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Mar;44(2):160-166
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Endotypes of Pollen Food Syndrome in Children with Seasonal Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: a molecular classification.  
Mastrorilli C, Tripodi S, Caffarelli C, Perna S, Di Rienzo BA, Sfika I, Asero R, Dondi A, Bianchi A, Povesi DC, Ricci G, Cipriani F, Maiello N, Miraglia Del GM, Frediani T, Frediani S, Mac.
Allergy 2016 Mar 21;
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The minor house dust mite allergen Der p 13 is a fatty acid binding protein and an activator of a TLR2-mediated innate immune response.  
Satitsuksanoa P, Kennedy M, Gilis D, Le MM, Suratannon N, Wai TS, Wongpiyabovorn J, Chatchatee P, Vangveravong M, Rerkpattanapipat T, Sangasapaviliya A, Piboonpocanun S, Nony E, Ruxrung.
Allergy 2016 Mar 28;
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Standardization of allergen products: 3. validation of candidate European pharmacopoeia standard methods for quantification of major birch allergen bet v 1.  
Kaul S, Zimmer J, Dehus O, Costanzo A, Daas A, Buchheit KH, Asturias JA, Barber D, Carnes J, Chapman M, yan-Kenigsberg J, Doring S, Fuhrer F, Hanschmann KM, Holzhauser T, Ledesma A, Moinge.
Allergy 2016 Mar 28;
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Biomonitoring of Prenatal Analgesic Intake and Correlation to Infantile Anti Aeroallergens IgE.  
Hoeke H, Roeder S, Mueller A, Bertsche T, Borte M, Rolle-Kampczyk U, von BM, Wissenbach DK.
Allergy 2016 Mar 25;
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The lipid-interaction capacity of Sin a 2 and Ara h 1, major mustard and peanut allergens of the cupin superfamily, endorses allergenicity.  
Angelina A, Sirvent S, Palladino C, Vereda A, Cuesta-Herranz J, Eiwegger T, Rodriguez R, Breiteneder H, Villalba M, Palomares O.
Allergy 2016 Mar 17;
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In vitro tests for Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions. An ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group Position Paper.  
Mayorga C, Celik G, Rouzaire P, Whitaker P, Bonadonna P, Cernadas JR, Vultaggio A, Brockow K, Caubet JC, Makowska J, Nakonechna A, Romano A, Montanez MI, Laguna JJ, Zanoni G, Gueant JL, Ou.
Allergy 2016 Mar 17;
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Drug allergies documented in electronic health records of a large healthcare system.  
Zhou L, Dhopeshwarkar N, Blumenthal KG, Goss F, Topaz M, Slight SP, Bates DW.
Allergy 2016 Mar 10;
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A new eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)-like disease without tissue eosinophilia found in EoE Families.  
Straumann A, Blanchard C, Radonjic-Hoesli S, Bussmann C, Hruz P, Safroneeva E, Simon D, Schoepfer AM, Simon HU.
Allergy 2016 Mar 11;
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Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.  
Kamalakannan M, Chang LM, Grishina G, Sampson HA, Masilamani M.
Allergy 2016 Mar 7;
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The role of allergen components for the diagnosis of latex-induced occupational asthma.  
Vandenplas O, Froidure A, Meurer U, Rihs HP, Rifflart C, Soetaert S, Jamart J, Pilette C, Raulf M.
Allergy 2016 Mar 4;
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Incidence and natural history of hen's egg allergy in the first 2 years of life-the EuroPrevall birth cohort study.  
Xepapadaki P, Fiocchi A, Grabenhenrich L, Roberts G, Grimshaw KE, Fiandor A, Larco JI, Sigurdardottir S, Clausen M, Papadopoulos NG, Dahdah L, Mackie A, Sprikkelman AB, Schoemaker AA, Du.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):350-357
Click to view abstract

IgE antibodies in relation to prevalence and multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from birth to adolescence.  
Ballardini N, Bergstrom A, Wahlgren CF, van HM, Hallner E, Kull I, Melen E, Anto JM, Bousquet J, Wickman M.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):342-349
Click to view abstract

Structural similarities of human and mammalian lipocalins, and their function in innate immunity and allergy.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Pacios LF, Bianchini R, Hofstetter G, Roth-Walter F.
Allergy 2016 Mar;71(3):286-294
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of allergic sensitivity to Acanthamoeba allergen in patients with chronic cough.  
Park HK, Park MK, Kim KU, Kang SA, Park SK, Ahn SC, Kim DH, Yu HS.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Mar;37(2):141-147
Click to view abstract

Increased specific immunoglobulin G4 antibodies induced by natural exposure to ambrosia pollen in patients with allergy.  
Ostojic V.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Mar;37(2):115-120
Click to view abstract

Approach to evaluation and management of a patient with multiple food allergies.  
Bird JA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Mar;37(2):86-91
Click to view abstract

Erratum: Butter Tolerance in Children Allergic to Cow's Milk.  
Yanagida N, Minoura T, Kitaoka S.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):178
Click to view abstract

The Hidden Culprit: A Case of Repeated Anaphylaxis to Cremophor.  
Kim YN, Kim JY, Kim JW, Kim JH, Kim HI, Yune S, Choi DC, Lee BJ.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):174-177
Click to view abstract

Papain induced occupational asthma with kiwi and fig allergy.  
Jiang N, Yin J, Wen L.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):170-173
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic value of specific IgE to Peanut and Ara h 2 in Korean children with peanut allergy.  
Kim HY, Han Y, Kim K, Lee JY, Kim MJ, Ahn K, Kim J.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):156-160
Click to view abstract

Mimotopes for Api g 5, a Relevant Cross-reactive Allergen, in the Celery-Mugwort-Birch-Spice Syndrome.  
Lukschal A, Wallmann J, Bublin M, Hofstetter G, Mothes-Luksch N, Breiteneder H, Pali-Scholl I, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):124-131
Click to view abstract

Shellfish and house dust mite allergies: Is the link tropomyosin?  
Wong L, Huang CH, Lee BW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Mar;8(2):101-106
Click to view abstract

Allergen extracts and recombinant proteins: comparison of efficiency of in vitro allergy diagnostics using multiplex assay on a biological microchip.  
Smoldovskaya O, Feyzkhanova G, Arefieva A, Voloshin S, Ivashkina O, Reznikov Y, Rubina A.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;129
Click to view abstract

The association between serum lead and total immunoglobulin E levels according to allergic sensitization.  
Kim JH, Chang JH, Choi HS, Kim HJ, Kang JW.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Mar;30(2):48-52
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms and positive skin-prick test results in patients with dry eye.  
Yenigun A, Dadaci Z, Sahin GO, Elbay A.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Mar;30(2):26-29
Click to view abstract

Item 322 - UE 10 Iatrogenicity. Diagnosis and Prevention: Drug toxidermia. [French]  

Ann Dermatol Venereol 2015 Jun;142 Suppl 2S228-S234

The NPC2 protein: A novel dog allergen.  
Khurana T, Newman-Lindsay S, Young PR, Slater JE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 17;
Click to view abstract

Math-free guides for glycerin and allergens at variable subcutaneous injection volumes: How's my dosing? Update.  
Grier TJ, Converse LM, Rekkerth DJ, Renahan KE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 24;
Click to view abstract

The economic effect and outcome of delaying oral food challenges.  
Couch C, Franxman T, Greenhawt M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 24;
Click to view abstract

A new patient-operated sampling device for measurement of aeroallergens.  
Gordon J, Detjen P, Kelso D, Gandhi P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 24;

Safety of chitosan processed wine in shrimp allergic patients.  
Amaral L, Silva D, Couto M, Nunes C, Rocha SM, Coimbra MA, Coimbra A, Moreira A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 18;

Multiple drug allergy: A case of anaphylaxis to levofloxacin but tolerance to ciprofloxacin.  
Dubini M, Marraccini P, Pignatti P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 18;

Stinging insect identification: Are the allergy specialists any better than their patients?  
Baker TW, Forester JP, Johnson ML, Sikora JM, Stolfi A, Stahl MC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 16;
Click to view abstract

Pollen used to produce allergen extracts.  
Codina R, Lockey RF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 16;
Click to view abstract

Effect of desert dust exposure on allergic symptoms: A natural experiment in Japan.  
Kanatani KT, Hamazaki K, Inadera H, Sugimoto N, Shimizu A, Noma H, Onishi K, Takahashi Y, Itazawa T, Egawa M, Sato K, Go T, Ito I, Kurozawa Y, Konishi I, Adachi Y, Nakayama T.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 11;
Click to view abstract

Association of food allergy and atopic dermatitis exacerbations.  
Roerdink EM, Flokstra-de Blok BM, Blok JL, Schuttelaar MA, Niggemann B, Werfel T, Van der HS, Kukler J, Kollen BJ, Dubois AE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar 3;
Click to view abstract

Allergic sensitization patterns identified through latent class analysis among children with and without asthma.  
Chen Q, Zhong X, Acosta L, Divjan A, Rundle A, Goldstein IF, Miller RL, Perzanowski MS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar;116(3):212-218
Click to view abstract

Immunoglobulin E, what is it good for?  
Kelly BT, Grayson MH.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar;116(3):183-187

The discovery of IgE 50 years later.  
Platts-Mills TA, Heymann PW, Commins SP, Woodfolk JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar;116(3):179-182

Exploring racial differences in IgE-mediated food allergy in the WHEALS birth cohort.  
Joseph CL, Zoratti EM, Ownby DR, Havstad S, Nicholas C, Nageotte C, Misiak R, Enberg R, Ezell J, Johnson CC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Mar;116(3):219-224
Click to view abstract

Identification of wheat sensitization using an in-house wheat extract in Coca-10% alcohol solution in children with wheat anaphylaxis.  
Pacharn P, Kumjim S, Tattiyapong P, Jirapongsananuruk O, Piboonpocanun S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 24;
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of drug provocation tests in Korean children: a single center experience.  
Choi J, Lee JY, Kim KH, Choi J, Ahn K, Kim J.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 24;
Click to view abstract

Age-dependent distribution of the atopic phenotype and allergen sensitization among asthmatic children in southern Taiwan.  
Su YT, Yang YN, Li YC, Tsai CC, Chen LM, Lin YC, Niu CK, Tsai YC.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 20;
Click to view abstract

Cloning and characterization of recombinant tropomyosin of giant freshwater shrimp M. rosenbergii to determine major allergens causing allergic reactions among shrimp-allergic children.  
Kumjim S, Jirapongsananuruk O, Piboonpocanun S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 20;
Click to view abstract

Provocation proven drug allergy in Thai children with adverse drug reactions.  
Indradat S, Veskitkul J, Pacharn P, Jirapongsananuruk O, Visitsunthorn N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;34(1):59-64
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of native and recombinant major allergen groups 1 and 2 of Dermatophagoides mites in mite sensitive Thai patients.  
Sookrung N, Choopong J, Seesuay W, Indrawattana N, Chaicumpa W, Tungtrongchitr A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;34(1):51-58
Click to view abstract

Anaphylactic reactions in adult patients in Southern Israel.  
Hananashvili I, Givon-Lavi N, Bartal C, Broides A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;34(1):44-50
Click to view abstract

Staphylococcal enterotoxin-specific IgE: a biomarker for a distinct phenotype of severe asthma?  
Chung KF.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Mar;46(3):387-389

Severe asthma, shrimp allergy and impact of maternal fatty acid status on their children.  

Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Mar;46(3):386

Basophil activation test: food challenge in a test tube or specialist research tool?  
Santos AF, Lack G.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;610
Click to view abstract

Genetic susceptibility for cow's milk allergy in Dutch children: the start of the allergic march?  
Henneman P, Petrus NC, Venema A, van SF, van der LK, Hennekam RC, Mannens M, Sprikkelman AB.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;67

Incompetence and failure to regulate methylisothiazolinone.  

Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):353-354

Contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone: Has there been any change? Experience of a UK centre.  
Warburton KL, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):398-400

Is methylisothiazolinone contact allergy a risk factor for polysensitization?  
Martin-Gorgojo A, Curto-Barredo L, Rovira-Lopez R, Pujol RM, Gimenez-Arnau A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):400-402

p-Phenylenediamine exposure in real life - a case-control study on sensitization rate, mode and elicitation reactions in the northern Netherlands.  
Vogel TA, Coenraads PJ, Bijkersma LM, Vermeulen KM, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):355-361

Hesperidin methyl chalcone - a new cosmetic contact allergen.  
Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):402-404

Airborne allergic contact dermatitis caused by disulfiram.  
Creytens K, Swevers A, De HP, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):405-407

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by Magnolia officinalis bark extract in a facial anti-ageing cream.  
Raison-Peyron N, Cesaire A, Du-Thanh A, Dereure O.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):416-417

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by laurel leaf oil.  
Bras S, Mendes-Bastos P, Amaro C, Cardoso J.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):417-419

A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by arbutin.  
Matsuo Y, Ito A, Masui Y, Ito M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):404-405

Contact sensitization to Geranium robertianum L. in an amateur gardener.  
Svendsen MT, Andersen KE, Thormann H, Paulsen E.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):420-421

An outbreak of contact allergy to cocamide diethanolamide?  
Badaoui A, Amsler E, Raison-Peyron N, Vigan M, Pecquet C, Frances C, Soria A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):407-409

Contact allergy to reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins.  
alto-Korte K, Kuuliala O, Henriks-Eckerman ML, Suuronen K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jun;72(6):387-397

Recommendation to include a textile dye mix in the European baseline series.  
Isaksson M, Ryberg K, Goossens A, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):15-20

Nickel hypersensitivity and orthodontic treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Golz L, Papageorgiou SN, Jager A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):1-14

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by N-butyl-1,2-benzisothiazolin-3-one in a cutting fluid.  
Dahlin J, Isaksson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):60-62

Delayed hypersensitivity to alpha-lipoic acid: look at dietary supplements.  
Rizzi A, Nucera E, Buonomo A, Schiavino D.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):62-63

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by prednicarbate presenting as chronic hand eczema.  
Otero-Rivas MM, Ruiz-Gonzalez I, Perez-Bustillo A, Rodriguez-Prieto MA.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):51-52

Occupational hand eczema caused by nickel allergy and semi-quantified by dimethylglyoxime testing of the skin.  
Bangsgaard N, Thyssen JP, Hald M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):65-67

Phenylephrine is a frequent cause of periorbital allergic contact dermatitis.  
Madsen JT, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):64-65

Strip patch testing does not affect reaction profiles of standard allergens.  
Dickel H, Kreft B, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):36-43

Designing a new model for cosmetic adverse reaction monitoring in China.  
Lu C, Cheng G, Shen L, Tian Y, Zhou Z, Li X, Du X.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):29-35

'Mislabelled' make-up remover wet wipes as a cause of severe, recalcitrant facial eczema.  
Isaksson M, Persson L.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):56-59

Decrease in the rate of sensitization and clinical allergy to natural rubber latex.  
Blaabjerg MS, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C, Mortz CG.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):21-28

Protein contact dermatitis caused by lime in a pastry chef.  
Assarian Z, Nixon RL.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):54-56

Occupational allergic contact urticaria caused by the crustaceans Palaemon serratus and Procambarus clarkii.  
Baynova K, Leguisamo S, Bartolome B, Prados M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):53-54

The electronic cigarette: the new source of nickel contact allergy of the 21st century?  
Maridet C, Atge B, Amici JM, Taieb A, Milpied B.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jul;73(1):49-50

Cross-Reactivity among Beta-Lactams.  
Romano A, Gaeta F, Poves MF, Valluzzi RL.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Mar;16(3):24
Click to view abstract

Classification of food allergens and cross-reactivity.  
Kazatsky AM, Wood RA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Mar;16(3):22
Click to view abstract

Standardization and Regulation of Allergen Products in the European Union.  
Zimmer J, Vieths S, Kaul S.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Mar;16(3):21
Click to view abstract

Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids: evaluation and management.  
Otani IM, Banerji A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Mar;16(3):18
Click to view abstract

Is advising food allergic patients to avoid food with precautionary allergen labelling out of date?  
Zurzolo GA, de Court, Koplin J, Mathai ML, Allen KJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 15;
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnosis in anaphylaxis.  
Cardona V, Ansotegui IJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 2;
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to manganese in metallic implant.  
Watchmaker J, Collins R, Chaney K.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):149-150

A method for at-home lesional testing for fixed drug eruption.  
Hanson JL, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):148

Contact dermatitis in saffron workers: clinical profile and identification of contact sensitizers in a saffron-cultivating area of Kashmir Valley of North India.  
Hassan I, Kamili A, Rasool F, Nehvi F, Rather P, Yasmin S, Pampori RA, Jabeen Y, Yaseen A, Bashir S, Naaz S.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):136-141

Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.  
Gosnell AL, Schmotzer B, Nedorost ST.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):133-135

Cinnamon spice and everything not nice: many features of intraoral allergy to cinnamic aldehyde.  
Isaac-Renton M, Li MK, Parsons LM.
Dermatitis 2015 May;26(3):116-121

Fermented rice flour in pediatric atopic dermatitis.  
Beretta S, Fabiano V, Petruzzi M, Budelli A, Zuccotti GV.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):104-106

Occupational sensitization to acrylates with paresthesias.  
Rodrigues-Barata AR, Gomez LC, Arceo JE, Barco L.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):103-104

Methylchloroisothiazolinone/Methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergy.  
Puangpet P, Chawarung A, McFadden JP.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):99-102

Patch testing custom isocyanate materials from the workplace.  
Burrows D, Houle MC, Holness DL, DeKoven J, Skotnicki S.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):94-98

Oral allergy syndrome (pollen-food allergy syndrome).  
Price A, Ramachandran S, Smith GP, Stevenson ML, Pomeranz MK, Cohen DE.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):78-88

Gold contact allergy: clues and controversies.  
Chen JK, Lampel HP.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):69-77

Gold remains an important allergen.  
Fowler JF.
Dermatitis 2015 Mar;26(2):67-68

Allergic contact dermatitis to methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone in cooling tower technicians.  
Maor D, Nixon R.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):62-64

Novel use of patch testing in the first report of allergic contact dermatitis to cyclobenzaprine.  
Turrentine JE, Marrazzo G, Cruz PD.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):60-61

Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from jewelry from a non-nickel directive country.  
Boonchai W, Maneeprasopchoke P, Suiwongsa B, Kasemsarn P.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):44-48

Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.  
Wood MM, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):7-25

Formaldehyde.  
Ponten A, Bruze M.
Dermatitis 2015 Jan;26(1):3-6

Nickel and cobalt release from children's toys purchased in Denmark and the United States.  
Jensen P, Hamann D, Hamann CR, Jellesen MS, Jacob SE, Thyssen JP.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):356-365

Patch testing in children from 2005 to 2012: results from the North American contact dermatitis group.  
Zug KA, Pham AK, Belsito DV, DeKoven JG, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF, Fransway AF, Maibach HI, Marks JG, Mathias CG, Pratt MD, Sasseville D, Storrs FJ, Taylor JS, Warshaw EM, Zirwas MJ.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):345-355

Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents: epidemiology, responsible irritants and allergens, clinical characteristics, and management.  
Heurung AR, Raju SI, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2014 Nov;25(6):289-326

Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.  
Cheng J, Zug KA.
Dermatitis 2014 Sep;25(5):232-245

Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.  
Lembo S, Lembo C, Patruno C, Balato A, Balato N, Ayala F.
Dermatitis 2014 Jul;25(4):191-194

Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergies can be detected by 200 ppm of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone patch test concentration.  
Leiva-Salinas M, Frances L, Marin-Cabanas I, Bouret AM, Silvestre JF.
Dermatitis 2014 May;25(3):130-134

IgE-mediated sensitization to malassezia in atopic dermatitis: more common in male patients and in head and neck type.  
Brodska P, Panzner P, Pizinger K, Schmid-Grendelmeier P.
Dermatitis 2014 May;25(3):120-126

Contact allergens in oral antihistamines.  
Enery-Stonelake M, Silvestri DL.
Dermatitis 2014 Mar;25(2):83-88

Concomitant patch test reactions to mercapto mix and mercaptobenzothiazole: retrospective analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994-2008.  
Warshaw EM, Raju SI, Mathias CG, DeKoven JG, Belsito DV, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, Zug KA, Zirwas MJ, Fowler JF, DeLeo VA, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ.
Dermatitis 2013 Nov;24(6):321-327

Oat and wheat as contact allergens in personal care products.  
Pootongkam S, Nedorost S.
Dermatitis 2013 Nov;24(6):291-295

Patch testing for drugs.  
Aquino MR, Sher J, Fonacier L.
Dermatitis 2013 Sep;24(5):205-214

The relevance of 7-day patch test reading.  
Higgins E, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2013 Sep;24(5):237-240

Methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone allergic contact dermatitis and the effect of patch test concentration.  
Higgins E, Kirby B, Rogers S, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2013 Mar;24(2):73-76

Allergic reactions to insect secretions.  
Pecquet C.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 Nov;23(6):767-773

Anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of jellyfish.  
Imamura K, Tsuruta D, Tsuchisaka A, Mori T, Ohata C, Furumura M, Hashimoto T.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 May;23(3):392-395

Practice of the Treatment of Milk Allergy in the UK: A National Audit.  
Luyt D, Krishnan MT, Huber P, Clark A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 17;169(1):62-68
Click to view abstract

Proven Non-beta-Lactam antibiotic allergy in children.  
Guvenir H, Dibek ME, Capanoglu M, Vezir E, Toyran M, Kocabas CN.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):45-50
Click to view abstract

Food Sensitization in Medically Resistant Chronic Rhinosinusitis with or without Nasal Polyposis.  
Al-Qudah M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):40-44
Click to view abstract

Immunological characterization of Dutch sesame seed-allergic patients.  
Teodorowicz M, Terlouw RJ, Jansen A, Savelkoul HF, Ruinemans-Koerts J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):13-22
Click to view abstract

Associations between Milk and Egg Allergens and the HLA-DRB1/DQ Polymorphism: A Bioinformatics Approach.  
Dimitrov I, Doytchinova I.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(1):33-39
Click to view abstract

Adverse Reaction to Omalizumab in Patients with Chronic Urticaria: Flare Up or Ineffectiveness?  
Ertas R, Ozyurt K, Yildiz S, Ulas Y, Turasan A, Avci A.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;15(1):82-86
Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy in Mexican children: what is the effect of age at first consumption?  
Bedolla BM, cala-Padilla G, Morales RJ, Camacho FJ, Rivera M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;15(1):53-61
Click to view abstract

The complexities of early peanut introduction for the practicing allergist.  
Greenhawt MJ, Fleischer DM, Atkins D, Chan ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):221-225
Click to view abstract

Clinical management of psychosocial concerns related to food allergy.  
Herbert L, Shemesh E, Bender B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):205-213
Click to view abstract

The natural history of food allergy.  
Savage J, Sicherer S, Wood R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):196-203
Click to view abstract

Exposure and health effects of fungi on humans.  
Baxi SN, Portnoy JM, Larenas-Linnemann D, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar 3;
Click to view abstract

Cor a 14, Hazelnut-Specific IgE, and SPT as a reliable tool in hazelnut allergy diagnosis in Eastern Mediterranean children.  
Buyuktiryaki B, Cavkaytar O, Sahiner UM, Yilmaz EA, Yavuz ST, Soyer O, Sekerel BE, Tuncer A, Sackesen C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):265-272
Click to view abstract

A case report with hypersensitivity to ferrous but tolerance of ferric iron salts.  
Yilmaz O, Erkasar CF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):343-344

Differences in caregiver food allergy quality of life between tertiary care, specialty clinic, and caregiver-reported food allergic populations.  
Ward C, Greenhawt M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Mar;4(2):257-264
Click to view abstract

Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid prevents the development of atopic dermatitis through prostaglandin D1 production in NC/Tnd mice.  
Amagai Y, Oida K, Matsuda A, Jung K, Kakutani S, Tanaka T, Matsuda K, Jang H, Ahn G, Xia Y, Kawashima H, Shibata H, Matsuda H, Tanaka A.
J Dermatol Sci 2015 Jul;79(1):30-37

Food allergy is associated with Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children with atopic dermatitis.  
Jones AL, Curran-Everett D, Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 23;

Majority of shrimp-allergic patients are allergic to mealworm.  
Broekman H, Verhoeckx KC, den Hartog Jager CF, Kruizinga AG, Pronk-Kleinjan M, Remington BC, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Houben GF, Knulst AC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 27;

Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.  
Romano A, Gaeta F, Valluzzi RL, Maggioletti M, Caruso C, Quaratino D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 23;
Click to view abstract

Persistence of the IgE repertoire in birch pollen allergy.  
Otte M, Mahler V, Kerpes A, Pabst O, Voehringer D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 18;

Chronic cat allergen exposure and low sensitization: Possible limitations in patient selection?  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Calzetta L, Piccolo A, Rogliani P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 10;

Peanut T-cell epitope discovery: Ara h 1.  
Ramesh M, Yuenyongviwat A, Konstantinou GN, Lieberman J, Pascal M, Masilamani M, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar 4;
Click to view abstract

The contributions of allergic sensitization and respiratory pathogens to asthma inception.  
Jackson DJ, Gern JE, Lemanske RF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;137(3):659-665
Click to view abstract

Risk of anaphylaxis after vaccination in children and adults.  
McNeil MM, Weintraub ES, Duffy J, Sukumaran L, Jacobsen SJ, Klein NP, Hambidge SJ, Lee GM, Jackson LA, Irving SA, King JP, Kharbanda EO, Bednarczyk RA, DeStefano F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Mar;137(3):868-878
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis due to oat ingestion.  
Prados-Castano M, Pinero-Saavedra M, Leguisamo-Milla S, Pastor C, Cuesta P, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016;26(1):68-69

Is microarray analysis really useful and sufficient to diagnose nut allergy in the Mediterranean area?  
Goikoetxea MJ, D'Amelio CM, Martinez-Aranguren R, Gamboa P, Garcia BE, Gomez F, Fernandez J, Bartra J, Parra A, Alvarado MI, Alonso MI, Gonzalez E, Terrados S, Moya C, Blanca N, Feo-Brito.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016;26(1):31-39
Click to view abstract

Is the quantification of antigen-specific basophil activation a useful tool for monitoring oral tolerance induction in children with egg Allergy?  
Gamboa PM, Garcia-Lirio E, Gonzalez C, Gonzalez A, Martinez-Aranguren RM, Sanz ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016;26(1):25-30
Click to view abstract

Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.  
Houben G, Burney P, Chan C-H, Crevel R, Dubois A, Faludi R, Klein Entinka R, Knulst A, Taylor S, Ronsmans S.
Miscellaneous Food Chem Tox 2016;89:8-18.
Abstract

Matrix effect on baked egg tolerance in children with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy.  
Miceli SS, Greco M, Cuomo B, Bianchi A, Liotti L, Monaco S, Dello I.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 28;
Click to view abstract

Parental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of life.  
Knibb RC, Barnes C, Stalker C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 28;
Click to view abstract

Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10 years experience in allergy work-up.  
tanaskovic-Markovic M, Gaeta F, Medjo B, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M, Velickovic TC, Tmusic V, Romano A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 21;
Click to view abstract

Prevalence and cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity in the first ten years of life.  
Venter C, Patil V, Grundy J, Glasbey G, Twiselton R, Arshad SH, Dean T.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 21;
Click to view abstract

DRESS syndrome developed related to acetylsalicylic acid use.  
Terlemez S, Demir F, Bulut Y, Carti O, Gokdogan D, Tokgoz Y, Yenigun A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;27(2):227-230

Wheat protein recognition pattern in tolerant and allergic children.  
Sievers S, Rawel HM, Ringel KP, Niggemann B, Beyer K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar;27(2):147-155
Click to view abstract

Easter egg hunt dermatitis: systemic allergic contact dermatitis associated with chocolate ingestion.  
Jacob SE, Hamann D, Goldenberg A, Connelly EA.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Mar;32(2):231-233

Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis. [Spanish]  
Seoane-Rodriguez M, Caralli ME, Morales-Cabeza C, Micozzi S, De Barrio-Fernandez M, Rojas Perez-Ezquerra P.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):104-107
Click to view abstract

Total immunoglobulin E as marker of allergy at Northeast of Mexico. [Spanish]  
Ramirez-Enriquez F, Prado-Rendon J, Lachica-Valle J, Valle-Leal J.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):20-25
Click to view abstract

Sensitivity and specificity of prick skin test with two concentrations of standardized extract of Culex quinquefasciatus in allergic children. [Spanish]  
Castro-Almarales RL, varez-Castello M, Ronquillo-Diaz M, Rodriguez-Canosa JS, Gonzalez-Leon M, Navarro-Viltre BI, Betancourt-Mesia D, Enriquez-Dominguez I, Reyes-Zamora MC, Oliva-Di.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):11-19
Click to view abstract

In silico analysis of the identity of lipocalin of dog, cat, horse, cow, hamster and hen. Possible role in allergic diseases. [Spanish]  
Sanchez A, Cardona R, Sanchez J.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Jan;63(1):1-10
Click to view abstract

A case of late-onset anaphylaxis to fermented soybeans (natto).  
Honda T, Michigami M, Miyachi Y, Kabashima K.
J Dermatol 2014 Oct;41(10):940-941

Allergic contact dermatitis due to carrots.  
Kawai M, Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Hagura A, Masuda K, Katoh N.
J Dermatol 2014 Aug;41(8):753-754

Study of the usefulness of patch testing and use test to predict the safety of commercial topical drugs.  
Horita K, Tanoue C, Yasoshima M, Ohtani T, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2014 Jun;41(6):505-513

Fixed eruption due to quinine in tonic water: a case report with high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet A analyses.  
Ohira A, Yamaguchi S, Miyagi T, Yamamoto Y, Yamada S, Shiohira H, Hagiwara K, Uno T, Uezato H, Takahashi K.
J Dermatol 2013 Aug;40(8):629-631


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