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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Medical complications of tattoos: a comprehensive review.
Read Pollen allergens for molecular diagnosis.
Read Current and emerging therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy.
Read Occupational allergy to pharmaceutical products.
Read How should occupational anaphylaxis be investigated and managed?
Read Characterization of a hypoallergenic wheat line lacking omega-5 gliadin.
Read Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.
Read First evidence of occupational asthma to argan powder in a cosmetic factory.
Read Multisystem reactions during egg oral food challenges may be associated with less severe reactions on initial presentation.
Read Exposure to bisphenol A enhanced lung eosinophilia in adult male mice.
Read In vivo diagnosis with purified tropomyosin in mite and shellfish allergic patients.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis due to ginkgo tree fruit and leaf.
Read Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 cashew allergens share cross-reactive CD4 T-cell epitopes with other tree nuts.
Read Dynamics of plasma levels of specific IgE in chlorhexidine allergic patients with and without accidental re-exposure.
Read Extended boiling of peanut progressively reduces IgE allergenicity while retaining T cell reactivity.
Read The basophil activation test not a useful screening tool for hymenoptera venom-related anaphylaxis in patients with systemic mastocytosis.
Read Ani s 11-like protein is a pepsin- and heat-resistant major allergen of Anisakis spp. and a valuable tool for Anisakis allergy component-resolved diagnosis.
Read Recombinant Pac c 3 from the Asian Needle Ant (Samsum ant) (Pachycondyla chinensis).
Read Molecular cloning and expression of Pro J 1: A new allergen of Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) pollen.
Read The high impact of penicillin allergy registration in hospitalized patients.
Read Progestogen hypersensitivity in 24 cases: diagnosis, management, and proposed renaming and classification.
Read Food-dependent anaphylaxis with serum IgE immunoreactive to dairy products containing high-molecular-weight proteins.
Read Food allergen labeling and purchasing habits in the US and Canada.
Read Molecular and cellular mechanisms of food allergy and food tolerance.
Read Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".
Read How relevant is panallergen sensitisation in the development of allergies?
Read Digestive hypersensitivity to non-IgE mediated food
Read Occupational skin diseases in the building trades
Read Allergy to polenta

Abstracts shared in April 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Endophthalmitis related to lemon allergy in a heroin addict.
Read Two patients with acute pancreatitis after undergoing oral food challenges.
Read Sensitization to a nonnative plant without exposure is a marker of panallergen sensitization.
Read Air and surface quantification of peanut Ara h 2 concentrations in common public settings.
Read The component-specific to total IgE ratios do not improve peanut and hazelnut allergy diagnoses.
Read Unexpected cause of urticaria.
Read Effects of milk containing only A2 beta casein versus milk containing both A1 and A2 beta casein proteins on gastrointestinal physiology, symptoms of discomfort, and cognitive behavior of people with self-reported intolerance to traditional cows' milk.
Read Analysis and critical comparison of food allergen recalls from the European Union, USA, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand
Read The association Alt 1 (Alternaria) -Act d 2 (kiwi): origin and potential clinical relevance
Read Severe accident anaphylactic to peanuts after reintroduction test negative
Read Case of allergy due to hydrolyzed wheat proteins in commercial boiled pork.
Read Caution: Reptile pets shuttle grasshopper allergy and asthma into homes.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Medical complications of tattoos: a comprehensive review.
Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing.

Medical complications of tattoos: a comprehensive review.  
Islam PS, Chang C, Selmi C, Generali E, Huntley A, Teuber SS, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr;50(2):273-286

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen allergens for molecular diagnosis.
Pollen allergens are one of the main causes of type I allergies affecting up to 30 % of the population in industrialized countries. Climatic changes affect the duration and intensity of pollen seasons and may together with pollution contribute to increased incidences of respiratory allergy and asthma. Allergenic grasses, trees, and weeds often present similar habitats and flowering periods compromising clinical anamnesis. Molecule-based approaches enable distinction between genuine sensitization and clinically mostly irrelevant IgE cross-reactivity due to, e. g., panallergens or carbohydrate determinants. In addition, sensitivity as well as specificity can be improved and lead to identification of the primary sensitizing source which is particularly beneficial regarding polysensitized patients. This review gives an overview on relevant pollen allergens and their usefulness in daily practice. Appropriate allergy diagnosis is directly influencing decisions for therapeutic interventions, and thus, reliable biomarkers are pivotal when considering allergen immunotherapy in the context of precision medicine

Pollen allergens for molecular diagnosis.  
Pablos I, Wildner S, Asam C, Wallner M, Gadermaier G.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Apr;16(4):31

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Current and emerging therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy.
Food allergies are a growing clinical problem leading to increased health care utilization and decreases in patient quality of life. Current treatment recommendations include strict dietary avoidance of the offending food as well as use of self-injectable epinephrine in case of accidental exposure with allergic reaction. Although many individuals will eventually outgrow their food allergies, a substantial number will not. Significant effort has been made to find novel treatments that protect patients from food-triggered reactions as well as to develop immune-modulating therapies that could lead to tolerance. In this review, three therapies that have shown the most promise for the treatment of food allergies are highlighted: oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and epicutaneous immunotherapy

Current and emerging therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy.  
Pesek RD, Jones SM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Apr;16(4):28

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergy to pharmaceutical products.
Purpose of Review: Occupational allergy in healthcare workers is common and can lead to significant costs from both loss of productivity within the workforce as well as those associated with diagnosis and treatment. This review aims to provide an update on drugs implicated in causing occupational allergy. Drugs traditionally reported as causing occupational allergy, such as penicillin, remain problematic. However, as their use reduces and newer drugs, such as cephalosporins, are used more frequently there is a changing pattern to occupational sensitization. In some studies up to 17% of healthcare workers now appear sensitized to cephalosporins. Other drug classes also reported include proton pump inhibitors and benzodiazepines. Interestingly, drugs such as omeprazole and tetrazepam rarely cause allergy in patients but can be very sensitizing if applied topically or inhaled. Recent studies involving pharmaceutical company employees show that this problem can no longer be considered primarily related to healthcare workers.

Occupational allergy to pharmaceutical products.  
Whitaker P.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):101-106

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
How should occupational anaphylaxis be investigated and managed?
Purpose of Review: Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction that can be life-threatening or fatal and can result from work-related exposures. This review study focuses on the assessment, main triggers, and management of occupational anaphylaxis.

How should occupational anaphylaxis be investigated and managed?  
Quirce S, Fiandor A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):86-92

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of a hypoallergenic wheat line lacking omega-5 gliadin.
There is no curative treatment for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). omega-5 Gliadin is one of the dominant allergens affecting WDEIA patients. The authors sought to find hypoallergenic bread wheat (or common wheat) that lacked the genes encoding omega-5 gliadin and to evaluate its in vitro allergenicity. The deletion lines of bread wheat were screened by western blotting to ascertain common wheat lines lacking the omega-5 gliadin locus. The authors found that a deletion line 1BS-18 had the least deficiency of chromosome 1B among the deletion stocks lacking the omega-5 gliadin locus. The challenge test using the guinea pigs revealed that the symptoms induced by application of the 1BS-18 gluten were much less than that of commercially available gluten.

Characterization of a hypoallergenic wheat line lacking omega-5 gliadin.  
Kohno K, Takahashi H, Endo TR, Matsuo H, Shiwaku K, Morita E.
Allergol Int 2016 Apr 18;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.
We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. 159 consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to >/=2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity.

Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.  
Uriarte S, Sastre J.
Allergy 2016 Apr 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
First evidence of occupational asthma to argan powder in a cosmetic factory.
Argan is used worldwide in numerous cosmetic products, as this fruit is supposed to have many beneficial properties on health. New cases of allergy can be expected with the growing use of argan. We investigated all workers (9) employed by a cosmetic factory and exposed to argan powder to identify possible allergies related to exposure to argan powder. Three cases of occupational asthma to argan powder and a probable case of rhinitis. Fifteen argan proteins were recognized by the patients' IgE. Identification of proteins, cross-reactions to nuts, and ELISA inhibition tests suggested that some argan allergens can cross-react in vitro with hazelnut allergens, including 11S globulin and vicilin.

First evidence of occupational asthma to argan powder in a cosmetic factory.  
Paris C, Herin F, Penven E, Thaon I, Richard C, Jacquenet S, Barbaud A, Poussel M.
Allergy 2016 Apr;71(4):550-555

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Multisystem reactions during egg oral food challenges may be associated with less severe reactions on initial presentation.
In this study, we assessed whether multisystem reactions to egg and extensively-heated (EH) egg during OFCs were associated with a history of multisystem reactions. Records of children, who underwent OFC to egg or EH egg over a five-year period were reviewed. Of the 120 challenges, 26 (21.67 %) failed, with 38.4 % (10/26) having multisystem reactions. Of the 13 who had multisystem reactions on initial presentation, only two (15.4 %) had a similar OFC outcome. Eighty percent (8/10) of those who had a multisystem OFC reaction had a less severe initial presentation. Initial and OFC multisystem reactions were not associated with each other

Multisystem reactions during egg oral food challenges may be associated with less severe reactions on initial presentation.  
Vitalpur G, Esquivel A, Kloepfer KM, Slaven JE, Leickly FE.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1221

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Exposure to bisphenol A enhanced lung eosinophilia in adult male mice.
Bisphenol A (BPA) is useful in many manufacturing processes and is also found in commonly used consumer products. Previous experimental studies have reported that perinatal exposure to BPA promotes the development of allergic lung inflammation in childhood and even into adulthood. In this study, the effects of BPA on allergic lung inflammation in adults were investigated in murine lungs. This study concludes that (1) the exposure of BPA could synergize with an OVA challenge to aggravate the severity of lung eosinophilia in adult mice, possibly by promoting a Th2-biased immune response and (2) the activation of macrophages and inflammatory cytokines released from these cells by BPA could be participating in this phenomenon.

Exposure to bisphenol A enhanced lung eosinophilia in adult male mice.  
He M, Ichinose T, Yoshida S, Takano H, Nishikawa M, Shibamoto T, Sun G.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1216

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vivo diagnosis with purified tropomyosin in mite and shellfish allergic patients.
The objective of this study was to determine the relevance of tropomyosin in mite- and shellfish-sensitized patients using tropomyosin skin testing. Patients were divided into 3 groups: group M included mite allergic patients (ie, individuals with respiratory symptoms and a positive result on skin prick testing [SPT] to house dust mites), group S included shellfish allergic patients (ie, individuals who reported symptoms with shellfish), and group MS included mite- and shellfish allergic patients (ie, individuals who simultaneously fulfilled the inclusion criteria for groups M and S). Tropomyosin was purified from shrimp, characterized, and used in SPT for diagnosis in the patient population. Eight hundred fifty patients were included in the study: 790 (92.9%) in group M, 21 (2.5%) in group S, and 39 (4.6%) in group MS. Tropomyosin was purified from shrimp. Forty-two individuals tested positive to tropomyosin: the prevalence was 2.7% in group M, 28.6% in group S, and 38.5% in patients of group MS. Twenty-one (50%) of the tropomyosin-positive individuals had symptoms with shellfish, and 3 (14.3%) reported anaphylaxis.

The prevalence of tropomyosin was low in mite-sensitized patients (2.7 %) and high in shellfish allergic patients (28.6%). The higher prevalence of tropomyosin was found in patients sensitized to both mite and shellfish (38.5%). The selection of tropomyosin-sensitized patients by SPT might help in the choice of appropriate treatments or management for these patients.

In vivo diagnosis with purified tropomyosin in mite and shellfish allergic patients.  
Lopez-Matas MA, de Larramendi CH, Moya R, Sanchez-Guerrero I, Ferrer A, Huertas AJ, Flores I, Navarro LA, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Vicario S, Andreu C, Pena M, Carnes J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 28;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis due to ginkgo tree fruit and leaf.
Allergic contact dermatitis due to ginkgo tree fruit and leaf. A 66-year-old woman who had picked ginkgo tree fruit from among ginkgo leaves with a glove in a field and collected ginkgo nuts within the fruit. Five days later, she developed erythematous edematous plaques and papulovesicles accompanied by pruritus on her body. Positive patch test reactions occurred with ginkgo fruit pulp extract, ginkgo leaf extract, and urushiol. An open test gave a positive reaction to extract of ginkgo fruit pulp. These findings led to a diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis with ginkgo fruit and ginkgo leaf. It is also possible that cross-reactions between gingko products and urushiol might occur.

Allergic contact dermatitis due to ginkgo tree fruit and leaf.  
Hotta E, Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Katoh N.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 Jul;23(4):548-549

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 cashew allergens share cross-reactive CD4 T-cell epitopes with other tree nuts.
In this study, cashew specific T-cell responses in cashew allergic subjects to Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 was characterized and cross-reactivity of these cashew specific cells toward other tree nut allergens examined. The study concludes that phylogenetically diverse tree nut allergens can activate cashew reactive T-cells and elicit a TH 2 type response at an epitope specific level.

Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 cashew allergens share cross-reactive CD4 T-cell epitopes with other tree nuts.  
Archila LD, Chow IT, McGinty JW, Renand A, Jeong D, Robinson D, Farrington ML, Kwok WW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dynamics of plasma levels of specific IgE in chlorhexidine allergic patients with and without accidental re-exposure.
This study investigated the dynamics of specific IgE in chlorhexidine allergic patients with and without re-exposure. All patients diagnosed with chlorhexidine allergy in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre January 1999 to March 2015 were invited to participate.Overall, 23 patients were included. Specific IgE within hours of reaction was available in eight patients and was >0.35kUA/l in six of these. During allergy investigations, usually two to four months later, specific IgE was >0.35kUA/l in 22 of 23 patients. In the following months/years specific IgE declined <0.35kUA/l in 17 of 23 patients (most rapidly within four months). Nine re-exposures in the healthcare setting were reported by seven patients (35%). Most re-exposures caused symptoms and was followed by an increase in specific IgE. Two patients with specific IgE <0.35kUA/l reacted upon re-exposure.

Therefore time from reaction should be considered when interpreting specific IgE-results. Specific IgE is >0.35kUA/l in most patients at time of reaction but should be repeated after a few weeks/months if negative. The optimal sampling time seems to be >1 month and <4 months. A value <0.35kUA/l neither excludes allergy nor implies loss of reactivity in previously sensitized patients. Re-exposures are common, often iatrogenic, and can cause a rebound in specific IgE.

Dynamics of plasma levels of specific IgE in chlorhexidine allergic patients with and without accidental re-exposure.  
Opstrup MS, Poulsen LK, Malling HJ, Jensen BM, Garvey LH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Extended boiling of peanut progressively reduces IgE allergenicity while retaining T cell reactivity.
Raw peanuts were boiled for half, 1, 2, 4 and 12 hours in deionized water. After dehydration, boiled and raw peanuts were ground, defatted and soluble proteins extracted in PBS and cooking water (leachate) retained. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, inhibition ELISA, mass spectrometry and skin prick test were used to characterize changes to peanut allergens and human IgE-reactivity. Extended boiling progressively reduced peanut allergenicity through a combination of leaching of allergens into cooking water, fragmentation of allergens, and denaturation of conformational epitopes. Two hour boiling led to an 8-fold reduction in IgE binding capacity of boiled peanuts as determined by inhibition ELISA, while 12 hour boiling led to a 19-fold reduction. Mass spectrometry revealed an increasing number of unique allergen peptides with longer boiling times. Raw, 2 hour and 12 hour boiled peanut extracts were equivalent in their ability to stimulate T cell activation and proliferation.

Extended boiling of peanut progressively reduces IgE allergenicity while retaining T cell reactivity.  
Tao B, Bernardo K, Eldi P, Chegeni N, Wiese M, Colella A, Kral A, Hayball J, Smith W, Forsyth K, Chataway T.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The basophil activation test not a useful screening tool for hymenoptera venom-related anaphylaxis in patients with systemic mastocytosis.
The basophil activation test (BAT) is proposed as a possible tool for diagnosing Hymenoptera venom-related allergy (HVA), especially in patients in whom conventional allergy tests yield contradictory results. Twenty nine outpatients with SM, according to WHO criteria, from September 2011 to January 2012 were evaluated. Various clinical data including intradermal test results, specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) measurements and BAT were performed. The study concludes that BAT is not a reliable tool for randomly screening SM patients for HVA

The basophil activation test is not a useful screening tool for hymenoptera venom-related anaphylaxis in patients with systemic mastocytosis.  
Rietveld MJ, Schreurs MW, Gerth van WR, van Daele PL, Hermans MA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):125-129

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ani s 11-like protein is a pepsin- and heat-resistant major allergen of Anisakis spp. and a valuable tool for Anisakis allergy component-resolved diagnosis.
Ani s 11-like protein has been proposed as an Anisakis allergen because its primary structure is similar to that of Ani s 11. The aims of this work were to analyse the frequency of detection of the Ani s 11-like protein and assess its diagnostic value. rAni s 11-like protein, rAni s 5 and rAni s 4 were expressed. Recombinant allergen detection patterns in 37 Anisakis-sensitised patients were determined. Ani s 11-like protein is a major allergen detected by 78% of Anisakis-allergic patients, and 13.5% of patients detect only the rAni s 11-like allergen. This allergen is heat stable because it retains its capability of binding IgE after boiling for 30 min and it is resistant to pepsin digestion for 120 min. These data indicate that the Ani s 11-like protein is a pepsin- and heat-resistant major allergen (Ani s 11.0201) of Anisakis spp. and a valuable tool for Anisakis allergy component-resolved diagnosis.

Ani s 11-like protein is a pepsin- and heat-resistant major allergen of Anisakis spp. and a valuable tool for Anisakis allergy component-resolved diagnosis.  
Carballeda-Sangiao N, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Careche M, Navas A, Caballero T, Dominguez-Ortega J, Jurado-Palomo J, Gonzalez-Munoz M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):108-112

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant Pac c 3 from the Asian Needle Ant (Samsum ant) (Pachycondyla chinensis).
Stings from the Asian needle ant (Samsum ant) are an important cause of anaphylaxis in East Asia. A 23-kDa protein homologous to antigen 5 is the major allergen produced by these ants. In this study, we aimed to produce a recombinant antigen 5 allergen, Pac c 3. The recombinant protein was recognized in 5 of 6 (83.3%) serum samples from patients with demonstrated anaphylaxis to ants. IgE reactivity to an antigen 5 allergen from Asian needle ant venom sac extract was specifically inhibited by the recombinant protein. It was also able to inhibit IgE binding to the vespid allergen Ves v 5 by ImmunoCAP analysis, indicating the presence of cross-reactivity.

IgE Reactivity of Recombinant Pac c 3 from the Asian Needle Ant (Pachycondyla chinensis).  
Jeong KY, Yi MH, Son M, Lyu D, Lee JH, Yong TS, Park JW.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):93-100

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular cloning and expression of Pro J 1: A new allergen of Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) pollen.
The aim of present study was to produce and purify the recombinant form of allergenic Ole e 1-like protein (Pro j 1) from the pollen of Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). After purification of the recombinant protein, its immunoreactivity was analysed by in vitro assays using sera from twenty one patients with an allergy to mesquite pollen. Twelve patients (57.14%) had significant specific IgE levels for this recombinant allergen.

Molecular cloning and expression of Pro J 1: A new allergen of Prosopis Juliflora pollen.  
Dousti F, Assarehzadegan MA, Morakabati P, Khosravi GR, Akbari B.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;15(2):122-131

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The high impact of penicillin allergy registration in hospitalized patients.
Prevalence of Pen-A registration in hospitalized patients is high, has high impact on antibiotic prescribing, and is associated with a higher risk of readmission. Verification of the Pen-A in hospitalized patients might restrict the use of reserve antibiotics and improve patient outcome

The high impact of penicillin allergy registration in hospitalized patients.  
van Dijk SM, Gardarsdottir H, Wassenberg MW, Oosterheert JJ, de Groot MC, Rockmann H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 28;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Progestogen hypersensitivity in 24 cases: diagnosis, management, and proposed renaming and classification.
This is the largest case series of patients with progestogen hypersensitivity (PH) with successful treatment outcomes. The new terminology progestogen hypersensitivity more accurately represents the diversity of presentations to endogenous or exogenous progestogens. We demonstrate that progestogen desensitization is successful in multiple patients and can result in symptom control and fertility. Women with cyclical allergic symptoms, including those undergoing IVF, should be evaluated for PH

Progestogen hypersensitivity in 24 cases: diagnosis, management, and proposed renaming and classification.  
Foer D, Buchheit KM, Gargiulo AR, Lynch DM, Castells M, Wickner PG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food-dependent anaphylaxis with serum IgE immunoreactive to dairy products containing high-molecular-weight proteins.
Food-dependent anaphylaxis with serum IgE immunoreactive to dairy products containing high-molecular-weight proteins is reported. Anaphylaxis induced by ingestion of processed cheese following aspirin intake, but not following exercise is reported in a 40-year-old Japanese man, with a 20-year history of occasional anaphylactic episodes, characterized by urticaria and occasional loss of consciousness. The episode occurred after ingestion of pizza, cakes, pastas, sandwiches or cheese. In addition, processed cheese but not milk induced anaphylaxis following ingestion of aspirin. A new IgE-binding antigenic protein present in cheese extracts stable even under the presence of pepsin was identified. Prick tests were positive for milk and milk proteins such as casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin. Ingestion of processed cheese (100 g) followed by the step-ladder exercise for 30 min did not induce any symptom.

However, when the patient consumed aspirin before ingestion of

food, he exhibited generalized urticaria, nasal obstruction, hypotension, and dyspnea. IgE antibodies that reacted with approx. 75-kDa protein contained substantially in milk and cheese extracts, and in minute concentrations in lactoferrin and casein. The sera from the healthy controls did not have these antibodies. In addition, the 75-kDa protein was apparently observed in milk and cheese. Oddly, despite the fact that the 75-kDa protein was found in milk and cheese, only the cheese and aspirin combination, but not the milk and aspirin combination, induced anaphylaxis.

Food-dependent anaphylaxis with serum IgE immunoreactive to dairy products containing high-molecular-weight proteins.  
Abe S, Kabashima K, Moriyama T, Tokura Y.
J Dermatol Sci 2010 Feb;57(2):137-140

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergen labeling and purchasing habits in the US and Canada.
Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) and Food Allergy Canada conducted a survey that was completed by over 6,600 food-allergic consumers and caregivers in the U.S. and Canada. It sought information about consumer food purchasing behavior in response to different food allergen labels in the US and Canada. The data collected was analysed to determine associations between respondents’ country of origin, severity of previous reactions and purchasing behaviors in relation to precautionary allergen labels. The survey results indicate that as many as 40% of allergic consumers or caregivers will purchase foods bearing a precautionary label stating that the product was “manufactured in a facility that also processes allergen”. Interestingly, only 11% of respondents said they purchased foods that bore a “may contain allergen” type precautionary statement. Almost a third of respondents were unaware that the law requires labeling of major allergens. Nearly half were either unsure or incorrectly believed that the law required foods to bear a precautionary allergen label. Those who had suffered, or cared for someone who had previously suffered a severe allergic reaction were less likely to purchase foods bearing a precautionary allergen label.

Food allergen labeling and purchasing habits in the US and Canada.  
Mary Jane Marchisotto, Laurie Harada, BA, Opal Kamdar, MD, Bridget Smith, PhD, et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016;137(2):AB81

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular and cellular mechanisms of food allergy and food tolerance.
Ingestion of innocuous antigens, including food proteins, normally results in local and systemic immune nonresponsiveness in a process termed oral tolerance. Oral tolerance to food proteins is likely to be intimately linked to mechanisms that are responsible for gastrointestinal tolerance to large numbers of commensal microbes. Here we review our current understanding of the immune mechanisms responsible for oral tolerance and how perturbations in these mechanisms might promote the loss of oral tolerance and development of food allergies. Roles for the commensal microbiome in promoting oral tolerance and the association of intestinal dysbiosis with food allergy are discussed. Growing evidence supports cutaneous sensitization to food antigens as one possible mechanism leading to the failure to develop or loss of oral tolerance. A goal of immunotherapy for food allergies is to induce sustained desensitization or even true long-term oral tolerance to food allergens through mechanisms that might in part overlap with those associated with the development of natural oral tolerance

Molecular and cellular mechanisms of food allergy and food tolerance.  
Chinthrajah RS, Hernandez JD, Boyd SD, Galli SJ, Nadeau KC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;137(4):984-997

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".
In Western Europe, Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of Hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of HVA research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extract and single major allergens to a molecular understanding of the entire "venome" as a system of unique and characteristic components. An increasing number of such components has been identified, characterized regarding function, and assessed for allergenic potential. Moreover, advanced expression strategies for recombinant production of venom allergens allow selective modification of molecules and provide insight into different types of immunoglobulin E reactivities and sensitization patterns. The obtained information contributes to an increased diagnostic precision in HVA and may serve for monitoring, re-evaluation, and improvement of current therapeutic strategies.

Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".  
Spillner E, Blank S, Jakob T.
Miscellaneous Front Immunol 2014 Feb 28;5:77.

Abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
How relevant is panallergen sensitisation in the development of allergies?
Panallergens comprise various protein families of plant as well as animal origin and are responsible for wide IgE cross-reactivity between related and unrelated allergenic sources. Such cross-reactivities include reactions between various pollen sources, pollen and plant-derived foods as well as invertebrate-derived inhalants and foodstuff. Here we provide an overview on the most clinically relevant panallergens from plants (profilins, polcalcins, non-specific lipid transfer proteins, pathogenesis-related protein family 10 members) and on the prominent animal-derived panallergen family, topomyosins. In addition, we explore the role of panallergens in the sensitisation process and progress of the allergic disease. Emphasis is given on epidemiological aspects of panallergen sensitisation and clinical manifestations. Finally, the issues related to diagnosis and therapy of patients sensitised to panallergens is outlined and the use of panallergens as predictors for cross-reactive allergy and as biomarkers for disease severity is discussed.

How relevant is panallergen sensitisation in the development of allergies?  
McKenna OE, Asam C, Araujo R, Roulias A, Goulart LR, Ferreira F.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 29;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Digestive hypersensitivity to non-IgE mediated food
Food hypersensitivities with a digestive tropism can have an allergenic or non-allergenic origin. The forms with an allergic mechanism have either an IgE-based immediate mechanism or a more complex non-IgE-based mechanism, notably a cell-based response. Other types of hypersensitivities can be mixed, for example, an IgE response based on a delayed hypersensitivity background. The IgE-dependant forms are the best known because they are the easiest to diagnose using a conventional allergy workup, but it is equally necessary to know the clinical expression of non-IgE mediated forms because they are frequent and if due to the same allergens, the usual allergy workup is not valuable; their diagnosis is based on the patient's history and on the result of provocation tests.

Les hypersensibilités digestives aux aliments non IgE médiées / Digestive hypersensitivity to non-IgE mediated food  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):76-83

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational skin diseases in the building trades
The building and public works sectors cover many activities with multiple skin hazards: this includes exposure to cement, acids, solvents and paints, to various adhesives and glues including epoxy and other very allergenic resins, to wood dusts (for joiners, carpenters and cabinet makers), carcinogenic hydrocarbons which affect those who work with asphalt in road construction, and crystalline silica dust which is responsible for contact dermatitis and scleroderma in stone masons, miners and potters. Prevention is essential.

Dermatoses professionnelles dans les métiers du bâtiment / Occupational skin diseases in the building trades  
C. Geraut, L. Geraut, D. Tripodi
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):155-159

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to polenta
The author reports the case of a patient who presented with food-associated anaphylaxis induced by effort (AAIE), her food allergy being due to lipid transfer protein (LTP). The reaction, which took place as the effort was ending, was preceded by consumption of polenta.

Allergie au pays du poulet / Allergy to polenta  
G. Dalampira
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):242-244

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Medical complications of tattoos: a comprehensive review.  
Islam PS, Chang C, Selmi C, Generali E, Huntley A, Teuber SS, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr;50(2):273-286
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Pollen allergens for molecular diagnosis.  
Pablos I, Wildner S, Asam C, Wallner M, Gadermaier G.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Apr;16(4):31
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Current and emerging therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy.  
Pesek RD, Jones SM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Apr;16(4):28
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Laboratory animal allergy: a new world.  
Feary J, Cullinan P.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):107-112
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Occupational allergy to pharmaceutical products.  
Whitaker P.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):101-106
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Allergen component analysis as a tool in the diagnosis of occupational allergy.  
Raulf M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):93-100
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Timing of allergen exposure and the development of food allergy: treating before the horse is out of the barn.  
Elizur A, Katz Y.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):157-164
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How should occupational anaphylaxis be investigated and managed?  
Quirce S, Fiandor A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;16(2):86-92
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Occupational Rhinitis.  
Grammer LC.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2016 May;36(2):333-341
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Endophthalmitis related to lemon allergy in a heroin addict.  
Armentia A, Pineda F, Martin-Armentia B, Ramos C, Gil Martin FJ, Palacios R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Apr 14;
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Transient hypertransaminasemia related to cow's milk protein antigen induced proctocolitis in infants.  
Tuna KC, Hizal G, Kocabas CN.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Apr 14;

Bleak allergy: First case report.  
Barbarroja-Escudero J, Sanchez-Gonzalez MJ, Rodriguez-Rodriguez M, ntolin-Amerigo D, Bartolome B, varez-Mon M.
Allergol Int 2016 Apr 29;

Characterization of a hypoallergenic wheat line lacking omega-5 gliadin.  
Kohno K, Takahashi H, Endo TR, Matsuo H, Shiwaku K, Morita E.
Allergol Int 2016 Apr 18;
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Anaphylaxis caused by gamma-cyclodextrin in sugammadex.  
Hotta E, Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Masuda K, Taura M, Nakagawa Y, Kanehisa F, Tashima S, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2016 Apr 6;

Anti-Ascaris immunoglobulin E associated with bronchial hyper-reactivity in 9-year-old rural Bangladeshi children.  
Takeuchi H, Khan AF, Yunus M, Hasan MI, Hawlader MD, Takanashi S, Kano H, Zaman K, Chowdhury HR, Wagatsuma Y, Nakahara S, Iwata T.
Allergol Int 2016 Apr;65(2):141-146
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Late reactions in food-allergic children and adolescents after double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges.  
Saleh-Langenberg J, Flokstra-de BB, AlAgla N, Kollen BJ, Dubois A.
Allergy 2016 Apr 27;
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Burden of allergy diets in Finnish day care reduced by change in practices.  
Erkkola M, Saloheimo T, Hauta-Alus H, Kukkonen AK, Virta S, Kronberg-Kippila C, Vaara E, Pelkonen AS, Fogelholm M, Makela MJ.
Allergy 2016 Apr 27;
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Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.  
Uriarte S, Sastre J.
Allergy 2016 Apr 25;
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Prick test: evolution toward automated reading.  
Justo X, Diaz I, Gil JJ, Gastaminza G.
Allergy 2016 Apr 21;
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Predictive values of egg specific IgE by two commonly used assay systems for the diagnosis of egg allergy in young children: a prospective multicenter study.  
Furuya K, Nagao M, Sato Y, Ito S, Fujisawa T.
Allergy 2016 Apr 9;
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Self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings - An EAACI Task Force Consensus Statement.  
Bilo MB, Cichocka-Jarosz E, Pumphrey R, Oude-Elberink JN, Lange J, Jakob T, Bonadonna P, Fernandez J, Kosnik M, Helbling A, Mosbech H, Gawlik R, Niedoszytko M, Patella V, Pravettoni V, Ro.
Allergy 2016 Apr 6;
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ASA must be given to classify multiple NSAID-hypersensitivity patients as selective or cross-intolerant.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Bogas G, Dona I, Torres MJ, Blanca M, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Canto G, Demir S, Olgac M, Unal D, Gelincik A, Colakoglu B, Buyukozturk S.
Allergy 2016 Apr;71(4):576-578

First evidence of occupational asthma to argan powder in a cosmetic factory.  
Paris C, Herin F, Penven E, Thaon I, Richard C, Jacquenet S, Barbaud A, Poussel M.
Allergy 2016 Apr;71(4):550-555
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Multisystem reactions during egg oral food challenges may be associated with less severe reactions on initial presentation.  
Vitalpur G, Esquivel A, Kloepfer KM, Slaven JE, Leickly FE.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1221
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Diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick testing for allergic rhinitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Nevis IF, Binkley K, Kabali C.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1220
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IgE serum concentration against airborne fungi in children with respiratory allergies.  
de Barros Bezerra GF, Haidar DM, da Silva MA, Filho WE, Dos Santos RM, Rosa IG, de C, Zaror L, Soares Brandao Nascimento MD.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1218
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Exposure to bisphenol A enhanced lung eosinophilia in adult male mice.  
He M, Ichinose T, Yoshida S, Takano H, Nishikawa M, Shibamoto T, Sun G.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1216
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In vivo diagnosis with purified tropomyosin in mite and shellfish allergic patients.  
Lopez-Matas MA, de Larramendi CH, Moya R, Sanchez-Guerrero I, Ferrer A, Huertas AJ, Flores I, Navarro LA, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Vicario S, Andreu C, Pena M, Carnes J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 28;
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Food allergy needs assessment, training curriculum, and knowledge assessment for child care.  
Lanser BJ, Covar R, Bird JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 21;
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The importance of knowing how allergen extracts are manufactured.  
Lockey RF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 19;

Degree of anxiety in food allergic children in a tertiary care center.  
Petrovic-Dovat L, Fausnight T, White AM, Zeiger T, Bansal PS, Garg N, Annapareddy J, Iriana S, Slattery MJ, Meyer RE, Bixler EO.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 8;
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Crotoxin: a novel allergen to occupational anaphylaxis.  
de Pontes LG, Cavassan NR, Creste CF, Junior AL, Arcuri HA, Ferreira RS, Barraviera B, Gagete E, Dos Santos LD.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 6;

Diagnostic value of Der p 1 and Der p 2 specific IgE in Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus IgE sensitization.  
Yang X, Fan G, Li J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;116(4):295-301
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Possible allergic fungal sinusitis.  
deShazo RD, Stringer S, Skipworth LB.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;116(4):290-294

The malady of penicillin allergy.  
Lang DM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;116(4):269-270

Self-reported prevalence and risk factors associated with food hypersensitivity in Mexican young adults.  
Puente-Fernandez C, Maya-Hernandez RL, Flores-Merino MV, Romero-Figueroa MD, Bedolla-Barajas M, Dominguez Garcia MV.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 1;
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Food allergy prevalence and management at an overnight summer camp.  
Redmond M, Kempe E, Strothman K, Wada K, Scherzer R, Stukus DR.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr 2;
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Utility of low-dose oral aspirin challenges for diagnosis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Jerschow E, Ren Z, Hudes G, Sanak M, Morales E, Schuster V, Spivack SD, Rosenstreich D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;116(4):321-328
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Allergic contact dermatitis due to ginkgo tree fruit and leaf.  
Hotta E, Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Katoh N.
Eur J Dermatol 2013 Jul;23(4):548-549

Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 cashew allergens share cross-reactive CD4 T-cell epitopes with other tree nuts.  
Archila LD, Chow IT, McGinty JW, Renand A, Jeong D, Robinson D, Farrington ML, Kwok WW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 29;
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Dynamics of plasma levels of specific IgE in chlorhexidine allergic patients with and without accidental re-exposure.  
Opstrup MS, Poulsen LK, Malling HJ, Jensen BM, Garvey LH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 15;
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Extended boiling of peanut progressively reduces IgE allergenicity while retaining T cell reactivity.  
Tao B, Bernardo K, Eldi P, Chegeni N, Wiese M, Colella A, Kral A, Hayball J, Smith W, Forsyth K, Chataway T.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 15;
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Pollen derived low molecular compounds enhance the human allergen specific immune response in vivo.  
Gilles-Stein S, Beck I, Chaker A, Bas M, McIntyre M, Cifuentes L, Petersen A, Gutermuth J, Schmidt-Weber C, Behrendt H, Traidl-Hoffmann C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr 7;
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When should infants start to EAT? Is it time to LEAP? And other nutty insights.  

Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Apr;46(4):514-515

Triclosan promotes epicutaneous sensitization to peanut in mice.  
Tobar S, Tordesillas L, Berin MC.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;613
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Clinical Features of Food Allergy during the 1st Year of Life: The ADAPAR Birth Cohort Study.  
Dogruel D, Bingol G, Altintas DU, Yilmaz M, Guneser KS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 23;169(3):171-180
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The basophil activation test is not a useful screening tool for hymenoptera venom-related anaphylaxis in patients with systemic mastocytosis.  
Rietveld MJ, Schreurs MW, Gerth van WR, van Daele PL, Hermans MA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):125-129
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Ani s 11-like protein is a pepsin- and heat-resistant major allergen of Anisakis spp. and a valuable tool for Anisakis allergy component-resolved diagnosis.  
Carballeda-Sangiao N, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Careche M, Navas A, Caballero T, Dominguez-Ortega J, Jurado-Palomo J, Gonzalez-Munoz M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):108-112
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IgE Reactivity of Recombinant Pac c 3 from the Asian Needle Ant (Pachycondyla chinensis).  
Jeong KY, Yi MH, Son M, Lyu D, Lee JH, Yong TS, Park JW.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):93-100
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Clinical relevance of IgE to profilin and/or polcalcin in pollen-sensitized patients.  
San NM, Braun T, Eder K, Berghaus A, Groger M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(2):101-107
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Toxocara canis and chronic urticaria.  
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;15(2):667
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The most common cow's milk allergenic proteins with respect to allergic symptoms in Iranian patients.  
Shokouhi SR, Fazlollahi MR, Barzegar S, Teymourpour P, Yazdanyar Z, Lebaschi Z, Nourizadeh M, Tazesh B, Movahedi M, Kashani H, Pourpak Z, Moin M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;15(2):161-165
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Indoor Dust Allergen Levels in the Homes of Patients with Childhood Asthma: An Experience From Southwestern Iran.  
Moghtaderi M, Farjadian S, Fereidouni M, Nasiri M, Nejat A.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;15(2):132-137
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Molecular cloning and expression of Pro J 1: A new allergen of Prosopis Juliflora pollen.  
Dousti F, Assarehzadegan MA, Morakabati P, Khosravi GR, Akbari B.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Apr;15(2):122-131
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The high impact of penicillin allergy registration in hospitalized patients.  
van Dijk SM, Gardarsdottir H, Wassenberg MW, Oosterheert JJ, de Groot MC, Rockmann H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 28;
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Pitfalls and peculiarities in chlorhexidine allergy.  
Spoerl D, Jandus P, Harr T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 27;

Adverse Drug Reactions Associated With Ceftaroline Use: A 2-Center Retrospective Cohort.  
Blumenthal KG, Kuhlen JL, Weil AA, Varughese CA, Kubiak DW, Banerji A, Shenoy ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 27;
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Two patients with acute pancreatitis after undergoing oral food challenges.  
Ogura K, Iikura K, Yanagida N, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 15;

Progestogen hypersensitivity in 24 cases: diagnosis, management, and proposed renaming and classification.  
Foer D, Buchheit KM, Gargiulo AR, Lynch DM, Castells M, Wickner PG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 15;
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Sensitization to a nonnative plant without exposure is a marker of panallergen sensitization.  
Hogan MB, Allenback GL, Chawla V, Mehta N, Plunkett G, Wilson NW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Apr 7;

Food-dependent anaphylaxis with serum IgE immunoreactive to dairy products containing high-molecular-weight proteins.  
Abe S, Kabashima K, Moriyama T, Tokura Y.
J Dermatol Sci 2010 Feb;57(2):137-140

Food-specific IgG is associated with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Wright BL, Kulis M, Guo R, Orgel KA, Wolf WA, Burks AW, Vickery BP, Dellon ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr 6;

Human IgE-independent systemic anaphylaxis.  
Finkelman FD, Khodoun MV, Strait R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr 26;
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Air and surface quantification of peanut Ara h 2 concentrations in common public settings.  
Jay Jin, John W. Yunginger, Nancy L. Ott
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016;137(2):AB192

Food allergen labeling and purchasing habits in the US and Canada.  
Mary Jane Marchisotto, Laurie Harada, BA, Opal Kamdar, MD, Bridget Smith, PhD, et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016;137(2):AB81

IgE antibodies and response to cow's milk elimination diet in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Erwin EA, Kruszewski PG, Russo JM, Schuyler AJ, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr 6;

Identification of IgE.  
Ishizaka K, Ishizaka T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr 15;
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The component-specific to total IgE ratios do not improve peanut and hazelnut allergy diagnoses.  
Grabenhenrich L, Lange L, Hartl M, Kalb B, Ziegert M, Finger A, Harandi N, Schlags R, Gappa M, Puzzo L, Stephan V, Heigele T, Busing S, Ott H, Niggemann B, Beyer K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr 14;
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Molecular and cellular mechanisms of food allergy and food tolerance.  
Chinthrajah RS, Hernandez JD, Boyd SD, Galli SJ, Nadeau KC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;137(4):984-997
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Household almond and peanut consumption is related to the development of sensitization in young children.  
Garcia-Boyano M, Pedrosa M, Quirce S, Boyano-Martinez T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Apr;137(4):1248-1251

Effective allergen avoidance for reducing exposure to house mite allergens and improving disease management in adult atopic asthmatics.  
Tsurikisawa N, Saito A, Oshikata C, Yasueda H, Akiyama K.
J Asthma 2016 Apr 6;0
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Fungal sensitisation in severe asthma is associated with the identification of Aspergillus fumigatus in sputum.  
Farrant J, Brice H, Fowler S, Niven R.
J Asthma 2016 Apr 6;0
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Unexpected cause of urticaria.  
Takeshi Kondo and Kazuhiko Terada
Med J Aust 2016; 204 (7): 266.
Abstract

Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".  
Spillner E, Blank S, Jakob T.
Miscellaneous Front Immunol 2014 Feb 28;5:77.
Abstract

Effects of milk containing only A2 beta casein versus milk containing both A1 and A2 beta casein proteins on gastrointestinal physiology, symptoms of discomfort, and cognitive behavior of people with self-reported intolerance to traditional cows' milk.  
Jianqin S, Leiming X, Lu X, Yelland GW,, Ni J, Clarke AJ7.
Miscellaneous Nutr J 2016 Apr 2;15:35.
Abstract

Analysis and critical comparison of food allergen recalls from the European Union, USA, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand  
Luca Bucchini, Antonella Guzzon, Roland Poms & Hamide Senyuva
Miscellaneous Food Additives & Contaminants
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How relevant is panallergen sensitisation in the development of allergies?  
McKenna OE, Asam C, Araujo R, Roulias A, Goulart LR, Ferreira F.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 29;
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Ethnic differences in prevalence of cashew nut, pistachio nut and almond allergy.  
Luyt DK, Vaughan D, Oyewole E, Stiefel G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 19;
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Low patch test reactivity to nickel in unselected adolescents tested repeatedly with nickel in infancy.  
Christiansen ES, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C, Halken S, Kjaer HF, Eller E, Host A, Mortz CG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 19;
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Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet.  
Maslin K, Dean T, Arshad SH, Venter C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Apr 7;
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L’anaphylaxie induite par l’exercice physique et l’ingestion d’aliments : un syndrome polymorphe et multifactoriel / Anaphylaxis induced by exercise and food intake: a polymorphic and multifactorial syndrome  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):55-57
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Analyse pollinique de l’atmosphère du campus d’Abomey-Calavi (Bénin) / Pollen analysis of the atmosphere of the campus of Abomey (Benin)  
G.M. Tossou, L.F. Chabi, A. Akoègninou, A. Ballouche, K. Akpagana
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):65-75
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Les hypersensibilités digestives aux aliments non IgE médiées / Digestive hypersensitivity to non-IgE mediated food  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):76-83
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L’association Alt a 1 (Alternaria)–Act d 2 (kiwi) : origine et pertinence clinique possible / The association Alt 1 (Alternaria) -Act d 2 (kiwi): origin and potential clinical relevance  
A. Barre, F. Bienvenu, S. Caze-Subra, M. Degaud, S. Viel, L. Garnier, J. Bienvenu, P. Rougé
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):84-89
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Une carrière à la mer interrompue : conséquences professionnelles de l’anaphylaxie d’effort / A career of a sea professional interrupted as a consequence of food-dependent anaphylaxis.  
P.-J. Valli, M. Gouitaa, C. Tummino, D. Charpin, P. Chanez
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):90-93
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Accident anaphylactique sévère à l’arachide après test de réintroduction négatif / Severe accident anaphylactic to peanuts after reintroduction test negative  
C. Chatain, I. Pin, P. Pralong, J.-P. Jacquier, M.-T. Leccia
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):94-97
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Pertinence clinique des tests cutanés dans la pollinose au plantain : apport du dosage des allergènes moléculaires / Clinical relevance of skin tests in pollinosis plantain: contribution of molecular allergen dosage  
G. Pauli, A. Nardi, C. Metz-Favre, F. de Blay
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):98-100
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Sensibilisation aux protéines contenues dans un pollen de lierre (Hedera helix) récolté par l’abeille chez l’allergique respiratoire aux pollens aéroportés ? / Sensitization to the proteins in pollen of an ivy (Hedera helix) collected by bees  
C. Nonotte-Varly
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(2):100-101
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Allergie alimentaire aux protéines végétales du nord au sud / Food allergy to vegetable proteins: Distribution from north to south  
J. Dakhil
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):104-105
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Allergie alimentaire et asthme exacerbateur / Food allergy and asthma exacerbation  
J. Just, F. Amat
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):106-108
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Les 7 toxidermies : présentation clinique / Seven types of adverse drug reactions  
E. Collet, B. Bonniaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):109-111
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Quels tests pour quelles toxidermies ? / Which skin tests for which drug allergies?  
A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):112-113
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Réactions d’hypersensibilité médicamenteuse en cardiologie / Drug allergy in cardiology  
C. Mouton-Faivre, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):126-128
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En neurologie : anti-convulsivants (surtout accidents retardés), biothérapies de la SEP / In neurology: Antiepileptics (especially delayed reactions) and biotherapies in multiple sclerosis  
T.A. Duong, L. Valeyrie-Allanore
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):129-130
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Dysregulation of intestinal and systemic immune responses in adults after perinatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA): Possible involvement of adverse food reactions [French]  
L. Guzylack-Piriou, Y. Malaise, C. Cartier, C. Lencina, C. Sommer, E. Gaultier, E. Houdeau, S. Menard
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):135-136
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Hypersensibilité aux coccinelles / Hypersensitivity to Asian ladybird beetles  
E. Girodet
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):137-139
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Moustiques et allergie / Mosquito allergy  
M. Drouet, M.-E. Sarre, J.-C. Bonneau, A. Hoppe
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):140-142
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La rentrée : une période à risque pour l’enfant allergique / Back to school: a period of risk for the allergic child  
A. Dieme, E. Bidat, G. Benoist
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):146-148
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Dermatoses professionnelles dans les métiers du bâtiment / Occupational skin diseases in the building trades  
C. Geraut, L. Geraut, D. Tripodi
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):155-159
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Dermatoses des forestiers / Dermatoses among foresters  
M.-B. Cleenewerck
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):160-162
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Asthme sévère : quels pneumallergènes ? / Severe asthma: what allergens?  
J.-M. Perotin
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):163-164
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Asthme et tabac / Asthma and tobacco  
C. Charpentier
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):165-168
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Pour : faut-il contre-indiquer les curares chez les patients sensibilisés à la pholcodine ? / For: Should curare-like agents be contra-indicated in patients allergic to pholcodine?  
P.M. Mertes, N. Petitpain, M. Drouet, C. Hoarau, J.M. Malinovsky, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):169-170
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Faut-il contre-indiquer les curares chez un patient allergique à la pholcodine ? / Is it against the curare-state in a patient allergic to pholcodine?  
C. Mouton-Faivre
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):171-172
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Controverse 2016 : faut-il doser la tryptase chez tous les patients allergiques ? Pour ! / 2016 controversy: should tryptase assay in all patients allergic? For !  
J. Vitte
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):173-175
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Faut-il doser la tryptase chez tous les patients allergiques ? : contre (controverse) / Should assaying tryptase in all allergic patients? : Against (controversy)  
D. Mariotte
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):176-178
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Manger des insectes, est-ce dangereux pour l’allergique ? / Is eating insects risky for allergic patients?  
X. Van der Brempt, E. Beaudouin, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):186-188
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Aspects cliniques de l’allergie aux parfums / Clinical aspects of allergy to perfumes  
A. Pons-Guiraud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):189-190
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Sensibilisations aux parfums : données issues des tests épicutanés / Sensitization to perfumes: Patch-test data  
A. Goossens
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):191-193
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Observatoire de 108 patients allergiques au lait de chèvre et/ou au lait de brebis / Monitoring of 108 patients allergic to milk goats and / or sheep's milk  
J. Raghani, L. Couderc, T. Bourrier, A. Nemni, D. de Boissieu, M. Drouet, A. Hoppe, J. Just, A. Deschildre, E. Bidat
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):217-219
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Lait de chèvre, lait de brebis : devenir et prise en charge / Goat milk and sheep milk: Evolution and management  
E. Bidat, J. Raghani, L. Couderc
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):220-222
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Évolution du profil de sensibilisation moléculaire avec l’âge / Molecular evolution of sensitization profile with age  
P. Eigenmann
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):228-229
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Allergie au pays du poulet / Allergy to polenta  
G. Dalampira
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):242-244
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Allergie au pollen de cyprès / Cypress pollen allergy  
D. Charpin, M. Calleja, C. Pichot, V. Penel, B. Hugues, P. Poncet
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):248-250
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Quelques mises à jour sur l’allergie aux bétulacées / A few updates about allergy to betulacea  
J.M. Devoisins
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):251-253
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Alpha-gal, de l’invertébré au vertébré / Alpha-gal, from invertebrate to vertebrate  
S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):257-259
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Poisson : au-delà de la bêta-parvalbumine / Fish allergens beyond beta-parvalbumin  
A. Kuehn, M. Morisset, C. Hilger
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):260-261
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Les thaumatin-like protéines / Thaumatin-like proteins  
P. Rougé, A. Barre
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):262-263
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Les allergènes végétaux au fil des saisons : profil de sensibilisation et sévérité clinique / Seasonal vegetable food allergens: Sensitization profile and clinical severity  
D. Sabouraud-Leclerc
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):264-266
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Asthme du boulanger / Baker’s asthma  
I. Thaon, E. Penven
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):267-268
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L’asthme dans la coiffure / Asthma in hairdressing  
E. Penven, J. Corriger, I. Thaon
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(3):269-271
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Case of allergy due to hydrolyzed wheat proteins in commercial boiled pork.  
Shinoda J, Inomata N, Chinuki Y, Morita E, Ikezawa Z.
J Dermatol 2012 Aug;39(8):724-726

Allergic reactions to milk appear sooner than reactions to hen's eggs: a retrospective study.  
Yanagida N, Minoura T, Kitaoka S.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;912
Click to view abstract

Caution: Reptile pets shuttle grasshopper allergy and asthma into homes.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Pali-Schöll I, Jensen SAF, Robibaro B, Kinaciyan T.
WAO Journal 2015;8:24
Abstract


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