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 Allergy Advisor Digest - June 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read What makes an allergen?
Read Prevalence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants in UK bakers.
Read Worldwide food allergy labeling and detection of allergens in processed foods.
Read Fruit and vegetable allergy.
Read Grain and legume allergy.
Read Hen's egg allergy.
Read Food allergy in adolescence and adulthood.
Read Immunological basis of food allergy (IgE-mediated, Non-IgE-mediated, and tolerance).
Read Use of a basophil activation test as a complementary diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults.
Read Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: a Comprehensive Review.
Read Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: A retrospective study.
Read Ara h 2 and Ara 6 are the best predictors of severe peanut allergy: A double-blind placebo-controlled study.
Read Position paper of the EAACI: Food allergy due to immunological cross-reactions with common inhalant allergens.
Read Occupational handling of nickel nanoparticles: a case report.
Read Clinical relevance of Corylus pollen in Poznan, western Poland.
Read Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather: a questionnaire study.
Read Copper hypersensitivity.
Read Triphenylguanidine, a new (old?) rubber accelerator detected in surgical gloves that may cause allergic contact dermatitis.
Read The dramatic increase in the rate of methylisothiazolinone contact allergy in Belgium: a multicentre study.
Read Cobalt release from earrings and piercing jewellery - analytical results of a German survey.
Read Clinical and epidemiological features of textile contact dermatitis: an Italian multicentre study.
Read Rationale for eliminating certain foods in children with food allergy.
Read Chlorhexidine anaphylaxis masquerading as septic shock.
Read Allergen levels in the hair of different cattle breeds.
Read Occupational asthma to 'the miracle tree' (Moringa oleifera)
Read Aspartame sensitivity? A double blind randomised crossover study.
Read Impact of the vulcanization process on the structural characteristics and IgE recognition of two allergens, Hev b 2 and Hev b 6.02, extracted from latex surgical gloves.
Read Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens
Read Differential IgE binding to isoallergens from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) in children and adults.
Read A population-based study of animal component sensitization, asthma and rhinitis in schoolchildren.
Read Influence of age on IgE response in peanut allergic children and adolescents from the Mediterranean area.
Read Caustic ingestions mimicking anaphylaxis: case studies and literature review.
Read Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster
Read Primary identification, biochemical characterization, and immunologic properties of the allergenic pollen cyclophilin cat R 1.
Read Reactivity of IgE to the allergen hyaluronidase from Polybia paulista (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) venom.

Abstracts shared in June 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Fish and shellfish allergy.
Read Non-IgE-Related Diagnostic Methods (LST, Patch Test).
Read IgE-related examination in food allergy with focus on allergen components.
Read Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.
Read Assessment of sensitization to grape and wine allergens as possible causes of adverse reactions to wine
Read Utility of specific IgE to Ara h 6 in peanut allergy diagnosis.
Read Debating histamine intolerance: are adverse reactions to histamine-containing foods fact or fiction?
Read IgE Antibody detection and component analysis in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.
Read Allergen skin prick testing in early childhood: reproducibility and prediction of allergic symptoms into early adulthood.
Read The prevalence of the oral allergy syndrome and pollen-food syndrome in an atopic paediatric population in south-west Sydney.
Read Immunological cross-reactivity between four distant parvalbumins-Impact on allergen detection and diagnostics.
Read Molecular characterization of contact urticaria in patients with melon allergy.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What makes an allergen?
This review article illustrates the allergenic properties of certain protein families and the underlying mechanisms of how allergens can stimulate innate immune responses and subsequently contribute to Th2-biased adaptive immune responses. Biochemical features as well as intrinsic adjuvant effects of allergens on the innate immune cells, in particular antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells, are taken into consideration.

What makes an allergen?  
Scheurer S, Toda M, Vieths S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May 18;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants in UK bakers.
"Among the most common epitopes for IgE antibodies are carbohydrate determinants, which are present on glycoproteins found in both plants and some invertebrate animals. These carbohydrate determinants are immunologically similar, highly cross-reactive and can interfere with IgE-specific assays, such as wood dust, which may result in a misdiagnosis of occupational allergy. The prevalence of specific IgE to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) in occupational respiratory allergy is not well described; however it has been reported to be 6% in Spanish adults attending a respiratory allergy clinic, 10% in Polish workers with suspected occupational respiratory allergy and 25% in German bakers."

Prevalence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants in UK bakers.  
Howarth H, Schofield S, Cannon J, Jones M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jun 12;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Worldwide food allergy labeling and detection of allergens in processed foods.
"The labeling of allergenic foods is an important public health measure to assist food-allergic consumers in avoiding foods that can cause allergic reactions. The regulatory framework for such labeling depends upon the selection of priority allergenic foods, which vary among countries. Most countries include milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, soybeans, and cereal sources of gluten on the priority allergenic foods list, as recommended by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. However, a variety of other foods appear on the priority lists of some countries but not on others. Sesame seeds, molluscan shellfish, buckwheat, and mustard are identified in two or more countries. In most countries, all ingredients derived from these priority allergen sources must also be declared on labels by source. However, exemptions exist for some ingredients in some countries but not in others. Detection methods are critical for the enforcement of allergen labeling regulations and for the investigation of allergic reactions in the community by public health officials. The development of detection methods has advanced considerably over the past several decades and will be briefly reviewed in this chapter. Because of the emphasis on labeling and the development of detection methods, the ingredient statement on packaged food labels now contains more information than ever before to assist food-allergic consumers."

Worldwide food allergy labeling and detection of allergens in processed foods.  
Taylor SL, Baumert JL.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101227-234

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fruit and vegetable allergy.
Fruit and vegetable allergies are the most prevalent food allergies in adolescents and adults. The identification of the allergens involved and the elucidation of their intrinsic properties and cross-reactivity patterns has helped in the understanding of the mechanisms of sensitisation and how the allergen profiles determine the different phenotypes. The most frequent yet contrasting fruit and vegetable allergies are pollen-food syndrome (PFS) and lipid transfer protein (LTP) syndrome. In PFS, fruit and vegetable allergies result from a primary sensitisation to labile pollen allergens, such as Bet v 1 or profilin, and the resulting phenotype is mainly mild, consisting of local oropharyngeal reactions. In contrast, LTP syndrome results from a primary sensitisation to LTPs, which are stable plant food allergens, inducing frequent systemic reactions and even anaphylaxis. Although much less prevalent, severe fruit allergies may be associated with latex (latex-fruit syndrome). Molecular diagnosis is essential in guiding the management and risk assessment of these patients. Current management strategies comprise avoidance and rescue medication, including adrenaline, for severe LTP allergies. Specific immunotherapy with pollen is not indicated to treat pollen-food syndrome, but sublingual immunotherapy with LTPs seems to be a promising therapy for LTP syndrome.

Fruit and vegetable allergy.  
Fernandez-Rivas M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101162-170

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Grain and legume allergy.
Among grains and legumes, wheat and soybean are the most frequent and well-characterized allergenic foods. Wheat proteins are divided into water/salt-soluble and water/salt-insoluble (gluten) fractions. The most dominant allergen in the former is alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor, which acts as an inhaled allergen causing baker's asthma. Gluten allergens, including omega-5 gliadin and high- and low-molecular-weight glutenins, contribute to wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in adults and immediate-type wheat allergies, including anaphylaxis, in children. Recently, wheat allergies exclusively caused by hydrolyzed wheat proteins or deamidated glutens have been reported, and the presence of unique IgE-binding epitopes has been suggested. Soybean allergens contributing to immediate-type allergic reactions in children are present in seed storage proteins, namely Gly m 5, Gly m 6 and Gly m 8. However, pollen-related soybean allergy in adults is caused by the Bet v 1 homolog of soybeans, Gly m 4. Taken together, the varying clinical manifestations of wheat and soybean allergies are predominantly caused by their different allergen components.

Grain and legume allergy.  
Ito K.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101145-151

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hen's egg allergy.
Egg allergy is one of the most frequent food allergies in infants and young children. The prevalence of egg allergy is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2% in children younger than 5 years of age. The reactions are mainly mediated by IgE and partially by non-IgE or are a mix of both types. Egg white contains more than 20 different proteins and glycoproteins. Ovomucoid (Gal d 1), ovalbumin (Gal d 2), conalbumin (ovotransferrin) (Gal d 3) and lysozyme (Gal d 4) have been identified as major allergens in hen's egg. Alpha-livetin (Gal d 5) is thought to be a main egg yolk allergen responsible for bird-egg syndrome. The diagnosis of egg allergy is based on history taking, antigen-specific IgE measurements, such as the skin prick test, in vitro antigen-specific blood IgE tests and histamine release tests, and oral food challenges. The measurements of specific IgE to ovomucoid and its linear epitopes are more useful in the diagnosis of heated egg allergy and in the prediction of prognosis. Currently, the management of egg allergy is essentially minimal elimination based on the correct identification of the causative allergen. Although oral immunotherapy is promising as a tolerance induction protocol, several questions and concerns still remain, predominantly regarding safety.

Hen's egg allergy.  
Urisu A, Kondo Y, Tsuge I.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101124-130

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy in adolescence and adulthood.
In young children, food allergy is usually acquired via the gastrointestinal tract and directed toward egg and milk. Adolescent and adult patients, however, mainly acquire food allergy via primary sensitization to inhalant allergens on the basis of cross-reactivity between proteins in inhalant sources and in food. This type of food allergy is frequently mediated by sensitization to broadly represented allergens, or so-called panallergens. Food allergic reactions in adult patients - similar to those in children - range in severity from very mild and local symptoms, as in contact urticaria of the oral mucosa, to systemic symptoms involving distal organs, to a fatal outcome. Plant foods, such as fruits, nuts, and vegetables, are the most prevalent allergenic foods in this age group.

Food allergy in adolescence and adulthood.  
Ballmer-Weber BK.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10151-58

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunological basis of food allergy (IgE-mediated, Non-IgE-mediated, and tolerance).
Food allergy includes a number of diseases that present with adverse immunological reactions to foods and can be IgE-mediated, non-IgE-mediated, or a combination of both mechanisms. IgE-mediated food allergy involves immediate hypersensitivity through the action of mast cells, whereas non-IgE-mediated food allergy is most commonly cell-mediated. These food allergies are thought to occur as a result of a breakdown in oral tolerance and, more specifically, from an aberrant regulatory T-cell response. Ongoing studies of experimental treatments for food allergy strive to induce oral tolerance and to teach us more about the pathogenesis of food allergy.

Immunological basis of food allergy (IgE-mediated, Non-IgE-mediated, and tolerance).  
Kim EH, Burks W.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;1018-17

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Use of a basophil activation test as a complementary diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults.
BAT is useful in determining the severity of peanut allergy and may be used as a complementary diagnostic tool to ensure accurate diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults. Thus, it may reduce the need to subject these patients to further tests, including an open challenge with peanuts

Use of a basophil activation test as a complementary diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults.  
Rentzos G, Lundberg V, Lundqvist C, Rodrigues R, van OJ, Lundell AC, Pullerits T, Telemo E.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;522

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: a Comprehensive Review.
"Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, including eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroenteritis, and colitis, refer to a spectrum of clinical diseases that present with variable degrees of infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by eosinophils in the absence of other known causes of tissue eosinophilia. Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings are usually non-specific and may or may not be accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. The extent of eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal wall varies from mucosal to transmural and serosal involvement. Diagnosis requires presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, demonstration of gastrointestinal eosinophilia by biopsy, and exclusion of other known causes of tissue eosinophilia. Many studies have pointed toward the eosinophil as the major offender; however, the exact functional role of the eosinophil in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders remains unclear. The roles of T-helper-2 cytokines and other mediators, such as eotaxin-1 and interleukin-5, have gained significant importance in the pathobiology of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Current understanding of treatment is based on case reports and a few case series, as there is a lack of large prospective studies. Steroids are currently the mainstay of therapy, but the roles of other drugs such as leukotriene inhibitors, mast cell stabilizers, interleukin-5 inhibitors, and anti-immunoglobulin E, along with other targets in the immune pathway, are currently being explored"

Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: a Comprehensive Review.  
Uppal V, Kreiger P, Kutsch E.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 9;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: A retrospective study.
Low dose reactive cow's milk (CM) allergic children are at high risk of persistent CM allergy and a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate if the results of a very low dose (VL) OFC with these children contributes to better management of CM allergy. The study concludes that a VL OFC allows the management of some low dose reactive CM allergic children to change from complete avoidance to partial intake of CM

Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: A retrospective study.  
Okada Y, Yanagida N, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):272-276

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ara h 2 and Ara 6 are the best predictors of severe peanut allergy: A double-blind placebo-controlled study.
Component-resolved diagnostics offers a modern tool in peanut allergy, but studies applying consistently double-blind placebo-controlled challenges are lacking. This study aimed to optimize diagnostics for moderate-to-severe peanut allergy in a birch-endemic region, and to create an oral-peanut challenge with its allergen activity characterized. Double-blind placebo-controlled peanut challenges for a referred sample of 6- to18-year-olds with peanut-sensitization or a high suspicion of peanut allergy, including anaphylaxis, were conducted. Specific-IgE (sIgE) to Ara h 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, and 9 was measured. Of the 102 patients, 69 were challenge-positive: 25 (36%) had severe, 36 (52%) moderate, and 8 (12%) mild symptoms; 38 (37%) received adrenalin. SIgE to Ara h 6 was the best marker of moderate-to-severe allergy. When sIgE to Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 were measured together, all (100%) severe reactions at low doses were successfully diagnosable. SIgE to Ara h 8 had no diagnostic value. Both non-roasted and roasted peanut inhibited 100% of IgE-binding to Ara h 1, 2, 3, and 6. Non-roasted peanut inhibited 87% of IgE-binding to Ara h 8, roasted inhibited 30%. The products lacked Ara h 9 activity.

Ara h 2 and Ara 6 are the best predictors of severe peanut allergy: A double-blind placebo-controlled study.  
Kukkonen AK, Pelkonen AS, Makinen-Kiljunen S, Voutilainen H, Makela MJ.
Allergy 2015 Jun 11;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Position paper of the EAACI: Food allergy due to immunological cross-reactions with common inhalant allergens.
"In older children, adolescents and adults, a substantial part of all IgE-mediated food allergies is caused by cross-reacting allergenic structures shared by inhalants and foods. IgE stimulated by a cross-reactive inhalant allergen can result in diverse patterns of allergic reactions to various foods. Local, mild or severe systemic reactions may occur already after the first consumption of a food containing a cross-reactive allergen. In clinical practice clinically relevant sensitizations are elucidated by skin prick testing or by the determination of specific IgE in vitro. Component resolved diagnosis may help to reach a diagnosis and may predict the risk of a systemic reaction. Allergy needs to be confirmed in cases of unclear history by oral challenge tests. The therapeutic potential of allergen immunotherapy with inhalant allergens in pollen-related food allergy is not clear, and more placebo-controlled studies are needed. As we are facing an increase of pollen allergies, a shift in sensitization patterns and changes in nutritional habits, the occurrence of new, so far unknown allergies due to cross-reactions is expected."

Position paper of the EAACI: Food allergy due to immunological cross-reactions with common inhalant allergens.  
Werfel T, Asero R, Ballmer-Weber BK, Beyer K, Enrique E, Knulst AC, Mari A, Muraro A, Ollert M, Poulsen LK, Vieths S, Worm M, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K.
Allergy 2015 Jun 10;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational handling of nickel nanoparticles: a case report.
A 26-year-old female chemist formulated polymers and coatings usually using silver ink particles. When she later began working with nickel nanoparticle powder weighed out and handled on a lab bench with no protective measures, she developed throat irritation, nasal congestion, 'post nasal drip,' facial flushing, and new skin reactions to her earrings and belt buckle which were temporally related to working with the nanoparticles. Subsequently she was found to have a positive reaction to nickel on the T.R.U.E. patch test, and a normal range FEV1 that increased by 16% post bronchodilator. It was difficult returning her to work even in other parts of the building due to recurrence of symptoms.

Occupational handling of nickel nanoparticles: a case report.  
Journeay WS, Goldman RH.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Sep;57(9):1073-1076

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical relevance of Corylus pollen in Poznan, western Poland.
This study examines hazel pollen levels in Poznan, western Poland, and the clinical relevance of this aeroallergen in the city.

Mean diurnal hazel pollen concentrations peaked around 14:00-16:00 when mean bi-hourly pollen concentrations were ~60 P m(-3). Onset of the hazel pollen season varied up to 87 days annually, and was significantly (r=-0.647; p<0.01) related to mean maximum temperature during late December. SPT data revealed that ~11% of allergy patients had positive skin reactions to Corylus pollen allergens, and most of these (94.4%) reacted to pollen allergens from other members of the Betulaceae family - alder or birch. Of those sensitized, 53% suffered from atopic dermatitis. Of patients examined for serum asIgE, 26.0% had asIgE measurements in classes 5 and 6.

Clinical relevance of Corylus pollen in Poznan, western Poland.  
Grewling L, Jenerowicz D, Nowak M, Polanska A, Jackowiak B, Czarnecka-Operacz M, Smith M.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(1):64-69

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather: a questionnaire study.
Chromium-allergic patients have more severe and more chronic contact dermatitis. Their primary chromium exposure comes from leather articles

Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather: a questionnaire study.  
Bregnbak D, Thyssen JP, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):338-347

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Copper hypersensitivity.
The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions

Copper hypersensitivity.  
Fage SW, Faurschou A, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):191-201

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Triphenylguanidine, a new (old?) rubber accelerator detected in surgical gloves that may cause allergic contact dermatitis.
Chemical analysis of extracts for patch testing is important in the identification of new possible allergens. In this case, a rubber accelerator (triphenylguanidine) previously not reported as a possible contact allergen was found in extracts of surgical gloves

Triphenylguanidine, a new (old?) rubber accelerator detected in surgical gloves that may cause allergic contact dermatitis.  
Dahlin J, Bergendorff O, Vindenes HK, Hindsen M, Svedman C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):242-246

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The dramatic increase in the rate of methylisothiazolinone contact allergy in Belgium: a multicentre study.
A dramatic increase in the rate of contact allergy caused by MI in cosmetics is occurring in Belgium. Notwithstanding the recent recommendation to discontinue the use of MI in leave-on cosmetics, safer use concentrations should also be determined for rinse-off products. In 2012, the sensitization rate for MCI/MI had increased to 4.5% and that for MI to 6.0%; the latter showed a further increase to 7.2% in 2013.

The dramatic increase in the rate of methylisothiazolinone contact allergy in Belgium: a multicentre study.  
Aerts O, Baeck M, Constandt L, Dezfoulian B, Jacobs MC, Kerre S, Lapeere H, Pierret L, Wouters K, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):41-48

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cobalt release from earrings and piercing jewellery - analytical results of a German survey.
This study concludes that Cobalt release from earrings and piercing jewellery, in particular from piercing posts, is considerable. Scientifically based exposure limits should be set, as in the case of nickel.

Cobalt release from earrings and piercing jewellery - analytical results of a German survey.  
Uter W, Schmid M, Schmidt O, Bock C, Wolter J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):369-375

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical and epidemiological features of textile contact dermatitis: an Italian multicentre study.
The prevalence of occupational and non-occupational textile dermatitis seems to be increasing, probably because of changed textile manufacturing techniques. This study evaluatedn the clinical features and epidemiology of textile contact dermatitis (TCD) in Italy. Occupational and non-occupational allergens were investigated in 277 textile dermatitis patients. Contact dermatitis was the most frequent clinical presentation (95.3%). TCD was more common in females, in the fourth to fifth decades of life, and in atopic dermatitis patients. The lesions were prevalently eczematous (74.2%), and mostly located on the trunk and lower limbs in non-occupational cases, and on the hands in textile workers. Allergic TCD (58.3%) was more frequent than irritant TCD. The dyes (Disperse Blue 124, Disperse Blue 106, and Disperse Yellow 3) were most frequently responsible (79.8%), especially in non-occupational TCD. Formaldehyde and resins were more important in occupational TCD. Concomitant reactions among textile dyes and/or finishing resins were observed in 50.0% of patients.

Clinical and epidemiological features of textile contact dermatitis: an Italian multicentre study.  
Lisi P, Stingeni L, Cristaudo A, Foti C, Pigatto P, Gola M, Schena D, Corazza M, Bianchi L.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):344-350

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Rationale for eliminating certain foods in children with food allergy.
Some caregivers of children with food allergy may eliminate specific foods from the diet of these children without first consulting doctors. The aim of this Japanese study was to investigate the prevalence of such practice and the sensitization of the offending foods. A total of 463 subjects were included in the analyses. Prevalence of patients with specific food avoidance of each of the food item was higher in the lower age group than the higher age group. More than 83% of the patients who avoided chicken egg, cow's milk or wheat were advised by their doctors to do so, while less than 49% of patients who avoided buckwheat did so for the same reason. The percentage of the patients who showed positive sensitization to buckwheat, peanut or shrimp, and avoided it without doctor's instructions, was 46%, 48%, and 34%, respectively. The study concludes that while the majority of caregivers of the children who visited our outpatient unit eliminated specific foods according to doctor's instructions, a considerable proportion of them do so inappropriately without first consulting a doctor

Rationale for eliminating certain foods in children with food allergy. [Japanese]  
Kawaguchi T, Futamura M, Kitazawa H, Ohya Y.
Arerugi 2015 May;64(5):714-720

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Chlorhexidine anaphylaxis masquerading as septic shock.
Chlorhexidine is a commonly used antiseptic and disinfectant in the health-care setting. Its usage has increased in recent years with intensive campaigns and infection control guidelines to combat hospital-acquired infections. As a result, patients and health-care workers (HCW) are exposed to increasing chlorhexidine usage. In recent years, adverse reactions to chlorhexidine ranging from allergic contact dermatitis, photosensitivity, fixed drug eruptions, urticaria and anaphylactic shock have been reported. Most have been isolated case reports on adverse reactions occurring in healthy individuals or HCW. We report a case of anaphylactic shock caused by applying chlorhexidine cleansing solution and masquerading as septic shock from left-leg necrotising fasciitis.

Chlorhexidine anaphylaxis masquerading as septic shock.  
Hong CC, Wang SM, Nather A, Tan JH, Tay SH, Poon KH.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 19;167(1):16-20

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen levels in the hair of different cattle breeds.
Cattle are well-known sources of respiratory allergens in agricultural environments. Breed-specific differences in Bos d 2 (a major bovine allergen) levels in cattle hair have been previously suggested but not fully characterized. The aim of the current study was to determine whether hair from common cattle breeds differs in protein and allergen content. 80 hair samples from 16 different cattle breeds were analyzed. A wide variability in all 3 tested parameters was observed between the individual samples. The protein content differed by about 35-fold (0.3-12 mg/g), the bovine hair allergen content differed by about 500-fold (37-18,553 microg/g), and the Bos d 2 content differed by about 1,200-fold (5-6,323 microg/g). Protein, bovine hair allergen, and Bod d 2 values correlated strongly and significantly with one another. No significant differences were found between the most common breeds in Germany (Simmental, Holstein, and Braunvieh) and a group of rare breeds or between female and male animals.

Allergen levels in the hair of different cattle breeds.  
Zahradnik E, Sander I, Bruning T, Raulf M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 13;167(1):9-15

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma to 'the miracle tree' (Moringa oleifera)
Occupational asthma to 'the miracle tree' (Moringa oleifera) described in a 32-year-old man working in the cosmetic industry who was investigated for possible diagnosis of work-related asthma. He was regularly exposed (3 hours/day; 3 days/week) in the workplace to a powder of M. oleifera used as a component of product moisturizers. The patient progressively complained of allergic-like rhinitis and respiratory symptoms (cough, chest tightness, dyspnea, wheezing), the occurrence of which was clearly modulated by the work-related exposure, especially the handling of a M. oleifera seed powder preparation. Challenge to the powder resulted in strong immediate positive reaction with a 21% decrease of FEV1. The skin prick test to a 10% solution of M. oleifera seed powder was positive. SDS-PAGE separation followed by protein staining of the Moringa seed extract showed not only the most abundant proteins of 8 and 9 kDa but also, weakly, proteins of 16, 20, and 43 kDa. In contrast, an immunoblot of the Moringa seed extract with serum of the patient revealed strongly IgE reactive proteins between 24 kDa and 56 kDa.

Occupational asthma to 'the miracle tree' (Moringa oleifera): first description.  
Poussel M, Penven E, Richard C, Jacquenet S, Chabot F, Paris C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Aspartame sensitivity? A double blind randomised crossover study.
There have been concerns over aspartame since approval in the 1980s including a large anecdotal database reporting severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to compare the acute symptom effects of aspartame to a control preparation. This was a double-blind randomized cross over study. Forty-eight individual who has self reported sensitivity to aspartame were compared to 48 age and gender matched aspartame non-sensitive individuals. Using a comprehensive battery of psychological tests, biochemistry and state of the art metabonomics there was no evidence of any acute adverse responses to aspartame. This independent study gives reassurance to both regulatory bodies and the public that acute ingestion of aspartame does not have any detectable psychological or metabolic effects in humans.

Aspartame sensitivity? A double blind randomised crossover study.  
Sathyapalan T, Thatcher NJ, Hammersley R, Rigby AS, Pechlivanis A, Gooderham NJ, Holmes E, le Roux CW, Atkin SL, Courts F.
Miscellaneous PLoS One 2015 Mar 18;10(3):e0116212.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impact of the vulcanization process on the structural characteristics and IgE recognition of two allergens, Hev b 2 and Hev b 6.02, extracted from latex surgical gloves.
The objective of this study was to purify two of the major allergens from latex surgical gloves to study the biochemical and structural changes that could be generated during the product manufacture and to compare their IgE recognition with the non-processed allergens. Glycosylated allergen Hev b 2 (beta-1,3-glucanase) and Hev b 6.02 (hevein) were purified from glove extracts. ELISA experiments were performed with both proteins and sera from allergic patients to assess the IgE recognition, which was heterogeneous. The 3D structure of Hev b 6.02 from surgical gloves did not show evident modification when compared with the protein from the natural non-processed form. Despite having the same crystallographic structure, the IgE from some patients showed different recognition when the glove and the natural allergen were used in ELISA. Three forms of Hev b 2 were identified: one corresponding to the complete polypeptide chain with posttranslational modifications, and two glycosylated fragments. The mixture of these three forms showed stronger recognition by IgE from latex-allergic patients than the pure non-processed allergen. In conclusion, IgE from subjects sensitized to latex products showed different recognition between the allergens obtained from a natural source and the processed material, even when the structure was maintained. This demonstrates the importance of using processed allergens in further investigations of diagnosis, prevalence, product allergenicity, and therapies.

Impact of the vulcanization process on the structural characteristics and IgE recognition of two allergens, Hev b 2 and Hev b 6.02, extracted from latex surgical gloves.  
Galicia C, Mendoza-Hernandez G, Rodriguez-Romero A.
Mol Immunol 2015 Jun;65(2):250-258

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens
In this study, IgE reactive recombinant egg white proteins were produced that can be used for future immunotherapy. Recombinant versions of Gal d 1, 2 and 3, were produced that were IgE reactive when tested against a pool of egg allergic patients' sera. Three were successfully produced, with only Gal d 4 showing loss of IgE reactivity in the recombinant version. The results suggest that egg allergy in Australian populations may mainly be due to IgE reactivity to Gal d 3 and 4, while Gal d 1 shows higher IgE reactivity.

Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens expressed in Escherichia coli.  
Dhanapala P, Doran T, Tang ML, Suphioglu C.
Mol Immunol 2015 May;65(1):104-112

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Differential IgE binding to isoallergens from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) in children and adults.
The aim of this study was to identify and characterize allergenic proteins from barramundi (Lates calcarifer) in both fish allergic adult and pediatric patients. Serum from 17 fish allergic adults and children from Australia were characterized against raw and heated barramundi. Two novel parvalbumin isoforms of the beta-type were identified as the only allergens in barramundi and subsequently designated as Lat c 1.0101 and Lat c 1.0201. These two isoallergens do not differ in their ability to bind IgE antibodies, but are differentially expressed in barramundi tissue.

Differential IgE binding to isoallergens from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) in children and adults.  
Sharp MF, Kamath SD, Koeberl M, Jerry DR, O'Hehir RE, Campbell DE, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2014 Nov;62(1):77-85

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A population-based study of animal component sensitization, asthma and rhinitis in schoolchildren.
Component-resolved studies of unselected pediatric populations are lacking. The aim was to describe sensitization to animal components and the association with asthma and rhinitis in animal-sensitized Swedish schoolchildren. A random sample of 696 children (11-12 y) from a Swedish population-based cohort was tested for sensitization to cat, dog and horse dander using ImmunoCAP. Sera from animal-sensitized children were further analyzed by microarray including three allergen components from cat, four from dog and two from horse. Of 259 animal-sensitized children (>/=0.1 kUA /L), 51% were sensitized to all three, 23% to two and 25% to one species. Current asthma and asthma symptoms following contact with cats were associated with co-sensitization to Fel d 1 and Fel d 4. This association was seen already at moderate-level sensitization (1-15 ISU) to Fel d 4, at which level most children were sensitized to Fel d 1, as well. In dog-sensitized children the majority was sensitized to more than one dog component, and co-sensitization to Can f 5 and Can f 1/f 2 conferred the greatest risk for asthma. Sensitization to the highly cross-reactive serum albumins was uncommon and not associated with asthma. Among schoolchildren in Northern Sweden, where mite allergy is uncommon, furry animals were the primary perennial sensitizers. Asthma was associated with higher levels of component sensitization, and sensitization to more than one component from the same animal conferred the greatest risk.

A population-based study of animal component sensitization, asthma and rhinitis in schoolchildren.  
Bjerg A, Winberg A, Berthold M, Mattsson L, Borres MP, Ronmark E.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 9;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Influence of age on IgE response in peanut allergic children and adolescents from the Mediterranean area.
This study reports that peanut allergy is frequent in children and adolescents from the Mediterranean area with allergy to plant-foods, with Ara h 2 and Ara h 9 being two important allergens. In younger patients Ara h 2 predominates over Ara h 9. The reverse was observed in older patients.

Influence of age on IgE response in peanut allergic children and adolescents from the Mediterranean area.  
Garcia-Blanca A, Aranda A, Blanca-Lopez N, Perez D, Gomez F, Mayorga C, Torres MJ, az-Perales A, Perkins JR, Villalba M, Blanca M, Canto G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 4;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Caustic ingestions mimicking anaphylaxis: case studies and literature review.
Anaphylaxis presents in children with rapid involvement of typically 2 or more organ systems including cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and respiratory. Caustic ingestions (CI) may also present with acute involvement of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and respiratory systems. We present 2 cases of 'missed diagnosis' that illustrate how CI presenting with respiratory symptoms can be mistaken for anaphylaxis owing to these similarities. Both of these patients had delay in appropriate care for CI as a result. These cases demonstrate the importance of considering CI in children who have gastrointestinal symptoms, respiratory distress, and oropharyngeal edema

Caustic ingestions mimicking anaphylaxis: case studies and literature review.  
Sherenian MG, Clee M, Schondelmeyer AC, de AA, Li J, Assa'ad A, Risma K.
Pediatrics 2015 Feb;135(2):e547-e550

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster
The aim of this study was the characterization and cloning of the major allergen from Siberian hamster. Thirteen Siberian hamster-allergic patients were recruited. Protein extracts were prepared from the hair, urine, and salivary glands of four hamster species (European, golden, Siberian, and Roborovski). Three IgE-binding proteins were identified in extracts obtained from Siberian hamster hair, urine, and salivary glands. All proteins corresponded to the same protein, which was identified as a lipocalin. This lipocalin had no cross-reactivity with common and golden hamsters.

Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).  
Torres JA, de Las HM, Maroto AS, Vivanco F, Sastre J, Pastor-Vargas C.
J Biol Chem 2014 Aug 22;289(34):23382-23388

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Primary identification, biochemical characterization, and immunologic properties of the allergenic pollen cyclophilin cat R 1.
Cyclophilin (Cyp) allergens are considered pan-allergens due to frequently reported cross-reactivity. In addition to well studied fungal Cyps, a number of plant Cyps were identified as allergens (e.g. Bet v 7 from birch pollen, Cat r 1 from periwinkle pollen). However, there are conflicting data regarding their antigenic/allergenic cross-reactivity, with no plant Cyp allergen structures available for comparison. Because amino acid residues are fairly conserved between plant and fungal Cyps, it is particularly interesting to check whether they can cross-react. Cat r 1 was identified by immunoblotting using allergic patients' sera followed by N-terminal sequencing. Cat r 1 ( approximately 91% sequence identity to Bet v 7) was cloned. Inhibition-ELISA showed cross-reactive binding of serum IgE from Cat r 1-allergic individuals to fungal allergenic Cyps Asp f 11 and Mala s 6. The molecular structure of Cat r 1 revealed a typical cyclophilin fold consisting of a compact beta-barrel made up of seven anti-parallel beta-strands along with two surrounding alpha-helices. This is the first structure of an allergenic plant Cyp revealing high conservation of the antigenic surface particularly near the PPIase active site, which supports the pronounced cross-reactivity among Cyps from various sources.

Primary identification, biochemical characterization, and immunologic properties of the allergenic pollen cyclophilin cat R 1.  
Ghosh D, Mueller GA, Schramm G, Edwards LL, Petersen A, London RE, Haas H, Gupta BS.
J Biol Chem 2014 Aug 1;289(31):21374-21385

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Reactivity of IgE to the allergen hyaluronidase from Polybia paulista (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) venom.
This study evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Hyal recombinant protein (Pp-Hyal-rec) which was expressed in an insoluble form in comparison with the allergenic native protein (Pp-Hyal-nat) for recognition of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the serum of allergic patients to venom of the endemic social wasp Polybia paulista from Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Hyal cDNA from the venom of the social wasp P. paulista (Pp-Hyal) was cloned. Both the native (Pp-Hyal-nat) and the recombinant (Pp-Hyal-rec) purified allergens assessed in the serum of 10 patients exclusively reactive to the venom of the social wasp P. paulista. The immune sera specifically recognized the band corresponding to the Pp-Hyal-rec protein (40 kDa) at a higher intensity than the native allergen (39 kDa). The sera recognized other proteins in P. paulista crude venom extract to a lesser extent, likely corresponding to other venom allergens such as phospholipase (34 kDa), Antigen 5 (25 kDa), and proteases. The recognition pattern of the immune sera to the Pp-Hyal-rec allergen strongly suggests that this recombinant antigen could be used for developing a diagnostic allergy test as well as for specific immunotherapy (IT)

Reactivity of IgE to the allergen hyaluronidase from Polybia paulista (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) venom.  
Justo Jacomini DL, Gomes Moreira SM, Campos Pereira FD, Zollner RL, Brochetto Braga MR.
Toxicon 2014 May;82104-111

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Prolonged ingestion of ovalbumin diet by sensitized mice improves the metabolic consequences induced by experimental food allergy.  
Batista NV, Pereira RV, Noviello ML, Dourado LP, Perez DA, Foureaux G, Ferreira AJ, Ferreira AV, Cara DC.
Clin Exp Immunol 2014 Dec;178(3):416-427
Click to view abstract

What makes an allergen?  
Scheurer S, Toda M, Vieths S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May 18;

Allergen-induced early and late asthmatic responses to inhaled seasonal and perennial allergens.  
Boulet LP, Gauvreau G, Boulay ME, O'Byrne P, Cockcroft DW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jun 26;

Prevalence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants in UK bakers.  
Howarth H, Schofield S, Cannon J, Jones M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jun 12;

Cord blood IgE: fetal or maternal?  
Meulenbroek LA, Knippels LM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jun;45(6):1012-1014

Educational programmes in food allergy.  
Kugler C, Brockow K, Ring J.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101263-269

Prevention of food allergy.  
Tsakok T, Du Toit G, Lack G.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101253-262

The effects of food allergy on quality of life.  
DunnGalvin A, Dubois AE, Flokstra-de Blok BM, Hourihane JO.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101235-252

Worldwide food allergy labeling and detection of allergens in processed foods.  
Taylor SL, Baumert JL.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101227-234

Food allergy: psychosocial impact and public policy implications.  
Sharma HP, Herbert LJ.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101221-226

Nutritional aspects and diets in food allergy.  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Groetch M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101209-220

Eosinophilic oesophagitis.  
Heine RG, Allen KJ.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101199-208

Anaphylaxis in food allergy.  
Pesek RD, Jones SM.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101191-198

Atopic eczema and food allergy.  
Wassmann A, Werfel T.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101181-190

Gastrointestinal food allergies.  
Heine RG.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101171-180

Fruit and vegetable allergy.  
Fernandez-Rivas M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101162-170

Fish and shellfish allergy.  
Thalayasingam M, Lee BW.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101152-161

Grain and legume allergy.  
Ito K.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101145-151

Peanut and tree nut allergy.  
Cox A, Sicherer SH.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101131-144

Hen's egg allergy.  
Urisu A, Kondo Y, Tsuge I.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101124-130

Cow's Milk Allergy in Children and Adults.  
Fiocchi A, Dahdah L, Albarini M, Martelli A.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;101114-123

Pharmacological management of acute food-allergic reactions.  
Richards S, Tang M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10196-105

Diagnostic elimination diets and oral food provocation.  
Wood RA.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10187-95

Non-IgE-Related Diagnostic Methods (LST, Patch Test).  
Matsumoto K.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10179-86

IgE-related examination in food allergy with focus on allergen components.  
Borres MP, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10168-78

Hints for diagnosis.  
Poulsen LK.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10159-67

Food allergy in adolescence and adulthood.  
Ballmer-Weber BK.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10151-58

Food allergy in childhood (infancy to school age).  
Bergmann MM, Eigenmann PA.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10138-50

Epidemiology: international point of view, from childhood to adults, food allergens.  
Wong GW.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10130-37

Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.  
Lorenz AR, Scheurer S, Vieths S.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;10118-29

Immunological basis of food allergy (IgE-mediated, Non-IgE-mediated, and tolerance).  
Kim EH, Burks W.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;1018-17

Historical background, definitions and differential diagnosis.  
Sampson HA.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2015;1011-7

Identification of risk factors of severe hypersensitivity reactions in general anaesthesia.  
Mirone C, Preziosi D, Mascheri A, Micarelli G, Farioli L, Balossi LG, Scibilia J, Schroeder J, Losappio LM, Aversano MG, Stafylaraki C, Nichelatti M, Pastorello EA.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;13(1):11

Assessment of sensitization to grape and wine allergens as possible causes of adverse reactions to wine: a pilot study.  
Jaeckels N, Bellinghausen I, Fronk P, Heydenreich B, Saloga J, Decker H.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;521

Use of a basophil activation test as a complementary diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults.  
Rentzos G, Lundberg V, Lundqvist C, Rodrigues R, van OJ, Lundell AC, Pullerits T, Telemo E.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;522

Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: a Comprehensive Review.  
Uppal V, Kreiger P, Kutsch E.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 9;

Repeated nitrogen dioxide exposures and eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics: a randomized crossover study.  
Ezratty V, Guillossou G, Neukirch C, Dehoux M, Koscielny S, Bonay M, Cabanes PA, Samet JM, Mure P, Ropert L, Tokarek S, Lambrozo J, Aubier M.
Environ Health Perspect 2014 Aug;122(8):850-855

Severe delayed skin reactions related to drugs in the paediatric age group: A review of the subject by way of three cases (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and DRESS).  
Belver MT, Michavila A, Bobolea I, Feito M, Bellon T, Quirce S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jun 15;

Occupational food allergy due to parvalbumin and phaseolin induced by epicutaneous sensitization.  
Yagami A, Suzuki K, Nakamura M, Sano A, Kobayashi T, Iwata Y, Arima M, Hara K, Matsunaga K.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):287-288

Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: A retrospective study.  
Okada Y, Yanagida N, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):272-276

ILC2s and fungal allergy.  
Kita H.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):219-226

Diagnostic test allergens used for in-vivo diagnosis of allergic diseases are at risk: a European Perspective.  
Klimek L, Hoffmann HJ, Renz H, Demoly P, Werfel T, Matricardi PM, Muraro A, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Cardona V, Papadopoulos NG.
Allergy 2015 Jun 22;

Ara h 2 and Ara 6 are the best predictors of severe peanut allergy: A double-blind placebo-controlled study.  
Kukkonen AK, Pelkonen AS, Makinen-Kiljunen S, Voutilainen H, Makela MJ.
Allergy 2015 Jun 11;

Sensitization pattern affects the asthma-risk in Finnish adult population.  
Toppila-Salmi S, Huhtala H, Karjalainen J, Renkonen R, Makela M, Wang D, Pekkanen J.
Allergy 2015 Jun 11;

Position paper of the EAACI: Food allergy due to immunological cross-reactions with common inhalant allergens.  
Werfel T, Asero R, Ballmer-Weber BK, Beyer K, Enrique E, Knulst AC, Mari A, Muraro A, Ollert M, Poulsen LK, Vieths S, Worm M, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K.
Allergy 2015 Jun 10;

Allergic sensitization is associated with inadequate anti-oxidant responses in mice and men.  
Utsch L, Folisi C, Akkerdaas JH, Logiantara A, van de Pol MA, van der Zee JS, Krop EJ, Lutter R, van RR, van Rijt LS.
Allergy 2015 Jun 17;

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in workers exposed to metalworking fluids.  
Barber CM, Burton CM, Hendrick DJ, Pickering CA, Robertson AS, Robertson W, Burge PS.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Aug;57(8):872-880
Click to view abstract

Occupational handling of nickel nanoparticles: a case report.  
Journeay WS, Goldman RH.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Sep;57(9):1073-1076
Click to view abstract

House dust mites induce proliferation of severe asthmatic smooth muscle cells via an epithelium-dependent pathway.  
Trian T, Allard B, Dupin I, Carvalho G, Ousova O, Maurat E, Bataille J, Thumerel M, Begueret H, Girodet PO, Marthan R, Berger P.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2015 Mar 1;191(5):538-546

Immunomodulatory effect of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells in mouse model of allergic rhinitis.  
Samivel R, Kim EH, Chung YJ, Mo JH.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2015 Jun 16;

New pets, allergens and allergic dermatitis. [French]  
Brajon D, Waton J, Schmutz JL, Barbaud A.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2014 Oct;141(10):581-587
Click to view abstract

Skin tests in chronic hand dermatitis. [French]  
Bernier C, Gelot P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2014 Jun;141 Suppl 1S117-S126
Click to view abstract

Air-borne dermatitis from Chrysanthemum--case report with a discussion of diagnostic procedures and therapy.  
Aleksander O, Grazyna A, Anna WP.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(3):531-533
Click to view abstract

Effect of the nasal cycle on congestive response during bilateral nasal allergen provocation.  
Gotlib T, Samolinski B, Grzanka A.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(2):290-293
Click to view abstract

Clinical relevance of Corylus pollen in Poznan, western Poland.  
Grewling L, Jenerowicz D, Nowak M, Polanska A, Jackowiak B, Czarnecka-Operacz M, Smith M.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(1):64-69
Click to view abstract

Daily changes of peak expiratory flow and respiratory symptom occurrence around a soy processing factory.  
Heederik D, Doekes G, van SR, Brunekreef B.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(1):5-10
Click to view abstract

The South African Food Sensitisation and Food Allergy population-based study of IgE-mediated food allergy: validity, safety, and acceptability.  
Basera W, Botha M, Gray CL, Lunjani N, Watkins AS, Venter C, Allen KJ, Hlela C, Zar HJ, Levin ME.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 20;

Delay in diagnosis of severe food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by mango.  
Ta V, Tsang RT, Mannino AE, Ann LS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 18;

A behavioral economics intervention to encourage epinephrine-carrying among food-allergic adults: a randomized controlled trial.  
Cannuscio CC, Dupuis R, Graves A, Seymour JW, Kounaves S, Strupp E, Leri D, Frasso R, Grande D, Meisel ZF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 17;

First case of airborne-induced anaphylaxis triggered by fruit.  
Macias EM, Sierra-Salgado O, Bartolome B, Pastor-Vargas C, Munoz-Bellido FJ, Davila I.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 17;

Utility of specific IgE to Ara h 6 in peanut allergy diagnosis.  
Pedrosa M, Boyano-Martinez T, Garcia-Ara C, Caballero T, Quirce S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 11;

Impact of a clinical guideline for prescribing antibiotics to inpatients reporting penicillin or cephalosporin allergy.  
Blumenthal KG, Shenoy ES, Varughese CA, Hurwitz S, Hooper DC, Banerji A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 9;

Allergen of the month-annual ryegrass.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):A13

Response to 'mold allergy revisited'.  
Bardana EJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):538-539

Utility of delayed reading of intradermal test in carboplatin-induced drug hypersensitivity.  
D'Amelio CM, Aramendia JM, Yuste JR, Fusco JP, Gastaminza G, Goikoetxea MJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):534-535

Anaphylaxis induced by Goji berries.  
Zauli D, Mirarchi MG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):535-536

Contact allergy to capryloyl salicylic acid: a mechanistic chemistry and structure-activity perspective.  
Roberts DW, Aptula AO.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 May;72(5):347-351

Fragrance mix I: TRUE Test((R)) versus pet.-based patch test.  
Uter W.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Apr;72(4):256-258

'Allergyapp'--a novel app(lication) to detect contact allergens in cosmetic products.  
Gether L, Thyssen JP, Avnstorp C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):379-381

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by omeprazole in a horse breeder.  
Al-Falah K, Schachter J, Sasseville D.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):377-378

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by omeprazole in a veterinary medicament.  
Alwan W, Banerjee P, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):376

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil in an infant.  
Barrientos N, Moreno d, Dominguez J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):316-317

Silk contact anaphylaxis.  
Makatsori M, Scadding GW, Skypala I, Durham SR.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):314-315

Distearyl phthalic acid amide, a new contact allergen.  
Carballada F, Nunez R, Martin-Lazaro J, Boquete M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):310-312

Contact urticaria syndrome caused by polyaminopropyl biguanide in wipes for intimate hygiene.  
Creytens K, Goossens A, Faber M, Ebo D, Aerts O.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):307-309

Allergic contact dermatitis presenting as severe and persistent blepharoconjunctivitis and centrofacial oedema after dyeing of eyelashes.  
Vogel TA, Coenraads PJ, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):304-306

Eucalyptus contact allergy.  
Gyldenlove M, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):303-304

Sensitization to omeprazole in the occupational setting.  
Ghatan PH, Marcusson-Stahl M, Matura M, Bjorkheden C, Lundborg P, Cederbrant K.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):371-375

Fragrance patch tests prepared in advance may give false-negative reactions.  
Mowitz M, Svedman C, Zimerson E, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):289-294

Allergic reaction caused by acesulfame potassium in foods.  
Katsue H, Higashi Y, Baba N, Aoki M, Sakanoue M, Matsushita S, Kanekura T.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):251-252

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical propranolol in a 5-month-old baby.  
Bonifazi E, Milano A, Foti C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):250-251

Severe bullous allergic contact dermatitis caused by glycidyl methacrylate and other acrylates.  
Vogel TA, Christoffers WA, Engfeldt M, Bruze M, Coenraads PJ, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):247-249

Cross-reactivity between citral and geraniol - can it be attributed to oxidized geraniol?  
Hagvall L, Brared CJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):280-288

Contact sensitization to lettuce and rocket-salad with and without systemic elicitation of dermatitis after oral challenge.  
Paulsen E, Sommerlund M, Andersen F.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):188-190

Contact allergy to capryloyl salicylic acid.  
de Groot A1, Rustemeyer T, Hissink D, Bakker M..
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):185-187

Airborne allergic contact dermatitis caused by tin.  
Quenan S, Huber C, Pasche-Koo F, Piletta P.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):184-185

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil.  
Foti C, Romita P, Ranieri LD, Bonamonte D.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):183-184

Immunological contact urticaria caused by dimethyl fumarate.  
Stingeni L, Neve D, Tondi V, Bacci M, Lisi P.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):180-183

Erythema multiforme-like eruption following acute allergic contact dermatitis after exposure to the emulsified herbicide acetochlor.  
Dong H, Xu D, Hu Y, de Groot AC.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):178-180

Occupational contact urticaria and rhinitis caused by immediate allergy to palladium salts.  
Pesonen M, Airaksinen L, Voutilainen R, Riekki R, Jungewelter S, Suuronen K.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):176-177

Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather: a questionnaire study.  
Bregnbak D, Thyssen JP, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):338-347

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by D-limonene.  
Pesonen M, Suomela S, Kuuliala O, Henriks-Eckerman ML, alto-Korte K.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):273-279

Occupations at risk of developing contact allergy to isothiazolinones in Danish contact dermatitis patients: results from a Danish multicentre study (2009-2012).  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Andersen KE, Sommerlund M, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):295-302

The combined diagnosis of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in a retrospective cohort of 1000 consecutive patients with occupational contact dermatitis.  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):356-363

Positive patch test reactions to oxidized limonene: exposure and relevance.  
Brared CJ, Andersen KE, Bruze M, Johansen JD, Garcia-Bravo B, Gimenez AA, Goh CL, Nixon R, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):264-272

Copper hypersensitivity.  
Fage SW, Faurschou A, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):191-201

Occupational contact dermatitis in blue-collar workers: results from a multicentre study from the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group (2003-2012).  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Veien NK, Funding AT, Avnstorp C, Osterballe M, Andersen KE, Paulsen E, Mortz CG, Sommerlund M, Danielsen A, Andersen BL, Thormann J, Kristensen O, Kristensen B, Vi.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Dec;71(6):348-355

Triphenylguanidine, a new (old?) rubber accelerator detected in surgical gloves that may cause allergic contact dermatitis.  
Dahlin J, Bergendorff O, Vindenes HK, Hindsen M, Svedman C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):242-246

Patch test study of 90 patients with tattoo reactions: negative outcome of allergy patch test to baseline batteries and culprit inks suggests allergen(s) are generated in the skin through haptenization.  
Serup J, Hutton CK.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):255-263

Epicutaneous exposure to nickel induces nickel allergy in mice via a MyD88-dependent and interleukin-1-dependent pathway.  
Vennegaard MT, Dyring-Andersen B, Skov L, Nielsen MM, Schmidt JD, Bzorek M, Poulsen SS, Thomsen AR, Woetmann A, Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Odum N, Menne T, Geisler C, Bonefeld CM.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):224-232

Protein contact dermatitis caused by fishing bait in a patient with contact urticaria caused by shrimp.  
Ramos LC, Ribeiro F, Vieira R, Goncalo M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):126-128

Contact urticaria syndrome caused by direct hair dyes in a hairdresser.  
Vanden BK, Bruze M, Persson L, Deroo H, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):124-126

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by sodium cocoamphopropionate in a liquid soap used in fast-food restaurants.  
Hagvall L, Brared-Christensson J, Inerot A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):122-124

Contact urticaria and contact sensitization to yucca (Yucca gigantea Lem.) in a plant keeper.  
Paulsen E, Svendsen MT, Frankild S.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):119-121

Severe allergic contact dermatitis caused by a rubber glove coated with a moisturizer.  
Vanden BK, Zimerson E, Bruze M, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):117-119

Glove-related hand urticaria caused by disposable gloves in healthcare workers.  
Sheeran C, Cahill J, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):115-116

Systemic allergic dermatitis caused by cobalt and cobalt toxicity from a metal on a metal hip replacement.  
Wong CC, Nixon RL.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):113-114

Sofa dermatitis caused by methylisothiazolinone in a leather-care product.  
Vandevenne A, Vanden BK, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):111-113

Nickel release from white gold.  
Midander K, Kettelarij J, Julander A, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):109-111

Pitfalls of patch testing with glucosides.  
Shanmugam S, Wilkinson M, Kirk S.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):108-109

Contact allergy to epoxy hardeners.  
alto-Korte K, Suuronen K, Kuuliala O, Henriks-Eckerman ML, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):145-153

Non-irritant concentrations and amounts of active ingredient in drug patch tests.  
Brajon D, Menetre S, Waton J, Poreaux C, Barbaud A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):170-175

Erythematous reactions on removal of Scanpor(R) tape in patch testing are not necessarily caused by dermographism.  
Sheraz A, Simms MJ, White IR, White JM.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):62-64

Contact dermatitis caused by ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate in a cream used for the management of atopic dermatitis.  
Assier H, Wolkenstein P, Grille C, Chosidow O.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):60-61

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by Eustoma exaltatum russellianum (lisianthus).  
Foti C, Romita P, Filoni A, Antelmi A, Bonamonte D, Angelini G.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):59-60

Allergic contact dermatitis due to a surgical marker.  
Espasandin-Arias M, Vazquez-Osorio I, Garcia-Martinez FJ, Fernandez-Redondo V, Toribio J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):57-58

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by benzanthrone in a pair of trousers.  
Svedman C, Zimerson E, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):54-57

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by acrylates and methacrylates--a 7-year study.  
Ramos L, Cabral R, Goncalo M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):102-107

Positive relationship-intensity of response to p-phenylenediamine on patch testing and cross-reactions with related allergens.  
Thomas BR, White IR, McFadden JP, Banerjee P.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):98-101

Isothiazolinones in commercial products at Danish workplaces.  
Friis UF, Menne T, Flyvholm MA, Bonde JP, Lepoittevin JP, Le Coz CJ, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):65-74

A case of oral mucosal fixed eruption caused by methacrylate.  
Inozume T, Nakazawa R, Tanaka K, Harada K, Kawamura T, Shibagaki N, Shimada S.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):387-388

A case of acute contact dermatitis induced by formaldehyde in hair-straightening products.  
Van LL, Baeck M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):384-386

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by sodium chondroitin sulfate contained in a cosmetic cream.  
Vigan M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):383-384

Can expired TRUE Test(R) be used for patch testing?  
Rodrigues Barata AR, Haroun-Diaz E, Conde-Salazar GL.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):381-382

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by N,N-didecyl-N-methyl-poly(oxyethyl) ammonium propionate in a dental assistant.  
De Quintana SA, Raton JA, Eizaguirre X.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):379-380

An outbreak of allergic contact dermatitis caused by citral in beauticians working in a health spa.  
De MP, Johnston GA.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):377-379

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by 3-o-ethyl-L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C ethyl).  
Yagami A, Suzuki K, Morita Y, Iwata Y, Sano A, Matsunaga K.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):376-377

The dramatic increase in the rate of methylisothiazolinone contact allergy in Belgium: a multicentre study.  
Aerts O, Baeck M, Constandt L, Dezfoulian B, Jacobs MC, Kerre S, Lapeere H, Pierret L, Wouters K, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):41-48
Click to view abstract

Patch testing with a textile dye mix--a multicentre study.  
Ryberg K, Agner T, Andersen KE, Bircher A, Diepgen T, Foti C, Gimenez-Arnau A, Goncalo M, Goossens A, Johansen JD, Le CC, Maibach HI, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):215-223

Coupled exposure to ingredients of cosmetic products: III. Ultraviolet filters.  
Uter W, Goncalo M, Yazar K, Kratz EM, Mildau G, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):162-169

Cost-of-illness of patients with contact dermatitis in Denmark.  
Saetterstrom B, Olsen J, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):154-161

Tricresyl phosphate in polyvinylchloride gloves: a new allergen.  
Crepy MN, Langlois E, Melin S, Descatha A, sefa-Colas L, Jonathan AM, Ameille J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):325-328

Severe occupational chromium allergy despite cement legislation.  
Hedberg YS, Gumulka M, Lind ML, Matura M, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):321-323

Presumed airborne contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone causing acute severe facial dermatitis and respiratory difficulty.  
Alwan W, White IR, Banerjee P.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):320-321

Escalating methylisothiazolinone/methylchloroisothiazolinone allergy probably attributable to methylisothiazolinone in leave-on body cosmetics.  
Ali FR, Shepherd EL, Yell LC, Buckley DA, Williams JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):316-317

Concentrations and stability of methyl methacrylate, glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde and nickel sulfate in commercial patch test allergen preparations.  
Siegel PD, Fowler JF, Law BF, Warshaw EM, Taylor JS.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):309-315

Reaction profile in patch testing with allergens formed during vulcanization of rubber.  
Hansson C, Ponten A, Svedman C, Bergendorff O.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):300-308

Baseline series fragrance markers fail to predict contact allergy.  
Mann J, McFadden JP, White JM, White IR, Banerjee P.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):276-281

Outbreak of contact sensitization to methylisothiazolinone: an analysis of French data from the REVIDAL-GERDA network.  
Hosteing S, Meyer N, Waton J, Barbaud A, Bourrain JL, Raison-Peyron N, Felix B, Milpied-Homsi B, Ferrier Le Bouedec MC, Castelain M, Vital-Durand D, Debons M, Collet E, venel-Audran M, M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):262-269
Click to view abstract

Implants and contact allergy: are sensitizing metals released as haptens from coronary stents?  
Svedman C, Moller H, Gruvberger B, Gustavsson CG, Dahlin J, Persson L, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):92-97

Patch testing with methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone 200 ppm aq. detects significantly more contact allergy than 100 ppm. A multicentre study within the European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group.  
Bruze M, Isaksson M, Gruvberger B, Andersen KE, Goncalo M, Goossens A, Johansen JD, Maibach HI, Rustemeyer T, Le Coz CJ, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):31-34
Click to view abstract

Recommendation to increase the test concentration of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone in the European baseline patch test series - on behalf of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis and the European Environmental and Contact Dermat.  
Bruze M, Goossens A, Isaksson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):35-40
Click to view abstract

Pattern of contact sensitization in patients with and without atopic dermatitis in a hospital-based clinical database.  
Clemmensen KK, Thomsen SF, Jemec GB, Agner T.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Aug;71(2):75-81

Cobalt release from earrings and piercing jewellery - analytical results of a German survey.  
Uter W, Schmid M, Schmidt O, Bock C, Wolter J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):369-375

Screening occupational contact allergy to bisphenol F epoxy resin.  
alto-Korte K, Suuronen K, Kuuliala O, Henriks-Eckerman ML, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):138-144

Characterization of skin sensitizers from autoxidized citronellol - impact of the terpene structure on the autoxidation process.  
Rudback J, Hagvall L, Borje A, Nilsson U, Karlberg AT.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):329-339

The optimal patch test concentration for ascaridole as a sensitizing component of tea tree oil.  
Christoffers WA, Blomeke B, Coenraads PJ, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Sep;71(3):129-137

Contact allergy to ingredients of hair cosmetics - a comparison of female hairdressers and clients based on IVDK 2007-2012 data.  
Uter W, Gefeller O, John SM, Schnuch A, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jul;71(1):13-20

Parthenium dermatitis: is parthenolide an effective choice for patch testing?  
Mahajan VK, Sharma V, Gupta M, Chauhan PS, Mehta KS, Garg S.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):340-343

Patch testing with serial dilutions of various isothiazolinones in patients hypersensitive to methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone.  
Isaksson M, Gruvberger B, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):270-275
Click to view abstract

Limonene hydroperoxide analogues show specific patch test reactions.  
Christensson JB, Hellsen S, Borje A, Karlberg AT.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):291-299

An immune response study of oakmoss absolute and its constituents atranol and chloroatranol.  
Bonefeld CM, Nielsen MM, Gimenez-Arnau E, Lang M, Vennegaard MT, Geisler C, Johansen JD, Lepoittevin JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 May;70(5):282-290

Clinical and epidemiological features of textile contact dermatitis: an Italian multicentre study.  
Lisi P, Stingeni L, Cristaudo A, Foti C, Pigatto P, Gola M, Schena D, Corazza M, Bianchi L.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Jun;70(6):344-350

Midodrine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis.  
Sadeghpour M, Bunick CG, Robinson DM, Galan A, Tigelaar RE, Imaeda S.
Cutis 2014 May;93(5):E17-E20

Lichenoid photosensitivity: an unusual reaction to doxycycline and an unusual response.  
Susong J, Carrizales S.
Cutis 2014 May;93(5):E1-E2

Orofacial and digital frostbite caused by inhalant abuse.  
Koehler MM, Henninger CA.
Cutis 2014 May;93(5):256-260

Diagnostics and treatment of celiac disease. [German]  
Stallmach A, Schuppan D.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2015 Feb;140(3):198

Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome: Liver transplantation after treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricaemia. [German]  
Miederer SE, Miederer KO.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2014 Dec;139(49):2537-2540

Preventing peanut allergy.  

Arch Dis Child 2015 May;100(5):448-449

Active management of food allergy: an emerging concept.  
Anagnostou K, Stiefel G, Brough H, du Toit G, Lack G, Fox AT.
Arch Dis Child 2015 Apr;100(4):386-390

Development of medical educational program for pediatricians to improve their behavior in the management of food allergy. [Japanese]  
Tsumura Y, Yomase M, Chiba T, Narita M, Futamura M, Ohya Y.
Arerugi 2015 May;64(5):721-732

Rationale for eliminating certain foods in children with food allergy. [Japanese]  
Kawaguchi T, Futamura M, Kitazawa H, Ohya Y.
Arerugi 2015 May;64(5):714-720

Latex allergy safety-measures guideline 2013. [Japanese]  
Akasawa A.
Arerugi 2015 May;64(5):700-702

Risk of bee or wasp stings in various vacation destinations. [German]  
Mauss V.
Hautarzt 2014 Sep;65(9):770, 772-770, 774

Anaphylaxis to insect stings. [German]  
Przybilla B, Kapp A.
Hautarzt 2014 Sep;65(9):768-769

Management of complications after aesthetic hyaluronic acid injections. [German]  
Jahn K, Homey B, Gerber PA.
Hautarzt 2014 Oct;65(10):851-853

Jellyfish sting injuries. [German]  
Mebs D.
Hautarzt 2014 Oct;65(10):873-878

Debating histamine intolerance: are adverse reactions to histamine-containing foods fact or fiction? [German]  
Reese I.
Hautarzt 2014 Jun;65(6):559-566

Drug reactions caused by chemotherapy agents. [German]  
Ehmann LM, Schrumpf H, Gerber PA, Homey B.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):443-449

Drug-induced pruritus. [German]  
Maleki K, Weisshaar E.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):436-442

Immediate drug hypersensitivity. Epidemiology, clinical features, triggers and management. [German]  
Brockow K.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):409-414

Delayed-type cutaneous drug reactions. Pathogenesis, clinical features and histology. [German]  
Ziemer M.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):397-408

Cutaneous drug reactions. A special challenge for dermatologists. [German]  
Stander S, Mockenhaupt M.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):396

Cutaneous drug reactions imitating dermatoses. [German]  
Magnolo N, Schwarz T, Stander S.
Hautarzt 2014 May;65(5):424-429

Allergens causing occupational asthma: an evidence-based evaluation of the literature.  
Baur X, Bakehe P.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2014 May;87(4):339-363
Click to view abstract

Chlorhexidine anaphylaxis masquerading as septic shock.  
Hong CC, Wang SM, Nather A, Tan JH, Tay SH, Poon KH.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 19;167(1):16-20

Allergen levels in the hair of different cattle breeds.  
Zahradnik E, Sander I, Bruning T, Raulf M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 13;167(1):9-15

Exuberant Positive Patch Test to Abacavir in a Patient with the HLA-B*5701 Haplotype.  
Micozzi S, Rojas P, Rodriguez-Gamboa A, De BM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 25;

Occupational asthma to 'the miracle tree' (Moringa oleifera): first description.  
Poussel M, Penven E, Richard C, Jacquenet S, Chabot F, Paris C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 25;

IgE Antibody detection and component analysis in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Erwin EA, Tripathi A, Ogbogu PU, Commins SP, Slack MA, Cho CB, Hamilton RG, Workman LJ, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 19;

A Practical Guide to Patch Testing.  
Fonacier L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 5;

Food allergy emergency preparedness in Illinois schools: rural disparity in guideline implementation.  
Szychlinski C, Schmeissing KA, Fuleihan Z, Qamar N, Syed M, Pongracic JA, Singh AM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jun 5;

Paraphenylenediamine in black henna temporary tattoos: 12-year Food and Drug Administration data on incidence, symptoms, and outcomes.  
Goldenberg A, Jacob SE.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2015 Apr;72(4):724-726

Allergen skin prick testing in early childhood: reproducibility and prediction of allergic symptoms into early adulthood.  
Pesonen M, Kallio MJ, Siimes MA, Ranki A.
J Pediatr 2015 Feb;166(2):401-406
Click to view abstract

Pitfalls in food allergy diagnosis: serum IgE testing.  
Fleischer DM, Burks AW.
J Pediatr 2015 Jan;166(1):8-10

Food allergen panel testing often results in misdiagnosis of food allergy.  
Bird JA, Crain M, Varshney P.
J Pediatr 2015 Jan;166(1):97-100
Click to view abstract

New wheat allergens related to baker's asthma.  
Bittner C, Peters U, Frenzel K, Musken H, Brettschneider R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 19;

Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants.  
Fleischer DM, Sicherer S, Greenhawt M, Campbell D, Chan E, Muraro A, Halken S, Katz Y, Ebisawa M, Eichenfield L, Sampson H, Lack G, Du TG, Roberts G, Bahnson H, Feeney M, Hourihane J, Sperg.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 20;

Usefulness of recombinant gamma-gliadin 1 for identifying patients with celiac disease and monitoring adherence to a gluten-free diet.  
Srinivasan B, Focke-Tejkl M, Weber M, Pahr S, Baar A, Atreya R, Neurath MF, Vogelsang H, Huber WD, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 13;

Severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome caused by a novel mutation in the N-terminal plakin domain of desmoplakin.  
McAleer MA, Pohler E, Smith FJ, Wilson NJ, Cole C, MacGowan S, Koetsier JL, Godsel LM, Harmon RM, Gruber R, Crumrine D, Elias PM, McDermott M, Butler K, Broderick A, Sarig O, Sprecher E, Gr.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 12;

The risk of sensitization to furry animals in patients already sensitized to cat/dog: An in vitro evaluation using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.  
Liccardi G, Meriggi A, Russo M, Croce S, Salzillo A, Pignatti P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun;135(6):1664-1666

Skin test evaluation of a novel peptide carrier-based vaccine, BM32, in grass pollen-allergic patients.  
Niederberger V, Marth K, Eckl-Dorna J, Focke-Tejkl M, Weber M, Hemmer W, Berger U, Neubauer A, Stolz F, Henning R, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 3;

Safety, clinical, and immunologic efficacy of a Chinese herbal medicine (Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2) for food allergy.  
Wang J, Jones SM, Pongracic JA, Song Y, Yang N, Sicherer SH, Makhija MM, Robison RG, Moshier E, Godbold J, Sampson HA, Li XM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 1;

Exacerbation of atopic dermatitis on grass pollen exposure in an environmental challenge chamber.  
Werfel T, Heratizadeh A, Niebuhr M, Kapp A, Roesner LM, Karch A, Erpenbeck VJ, Losche C, Jung T, Krug N, Badorrek P, Hohlfeld JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 1;

Compensation for occupational skin diseases.  
Song HS, Ryou HC.
J Korean Med Sci 2014 Jun;29 SupplS52-S58

Workers' compensation for occupational respiratory diseases.  
Park SY, Kim HR, Song J.
J Korean Med Sci 2014 Jun;29 SupplS47-S51

The prevalence of the oral allergy syndrome and pollen-food syndrome in an atopic paediatric population in south-west Sydney.  
Brown CE, Katelaris CH.
J Paediatr Child Health 2014 Oct;50(10):795-800

Management of food allergy: a survey of Australian paediatricians.  
Morawetz DY, Hiscock H, Allen KJ, Davies S, Danchin MH.
J Paediatr Child Health 2014 Jun;50(6):432-437

Another person's poison.  
Smith M.
Lancet 2014 Dec 6;384(9959):2019-2020

Childhood food allergy and anaphylaxis: an educational priority.  
Mullins RJ, Loh RK.
Med J Aust 2015 Jan 19;202(1):7

Assessment of cardiac functions in infants with cow's milk allergy.  
Ece I, Demiroren K, Demir N, Uner A, Balli S.
Med Sci Monit 2014;201383-1388

Aspartame sensitivity? A double blind randomised crossover study.  
Sathyapalan T, Thatcher NJ, Hammersley R, Rigby AS, Pechlivanis A, Gooderham NJ, Holmes E, le Roux CW, Atkin SL, Courts F.
Miscellaneous PLoS One 2015 Mar 18;10(3):e0116212.

Mapping and characterization of antigenic epitopes of arginine kinase of Scylla paramamosain.  
Yang Y, Cao MJ, Alcocer M, Liu QM, Fei DX, Mao HY, Liu GM.
Mol Immunol 2015 Jun;65(2):310-320
Click to view abstract

Impact of the vulcanization process on the structural characteristics and IgE recognition of two allergens, Hev b 2 and Hev b 6.02, extracted from latex surgical gloves.  
Galicia C, Mendoza-Hernandez G, Rodriguez-Romero A.
Mol Immunol 2015 Jun;65(2):250-258
Click to view abstract

Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens expressed in Escherichia coli.  
Dhanapala P, Doran T, Tang ML, Suphioglu C.
Mol Immunol 2015 May;65(1):104-112
Click to view abstract

Immunological cross-reactivity between four distant parvalbumins-Impact on allergen detection and diagnostics.  
Sharp MF, Stephen JN, Kraft L, Weiss T, Kamath SD, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2015 Feb;63(2):437-448
Click to view abstract

Multiple IgE recognition on the major allergen of the Parietaria pollen Par j 2.  
Longo V, Costa MA, Cibella F, Cuttitta G, La GS, Colombo P.
Mol Immunol 2015 Feb;63(2):412-419
Click to view abstract

Differential IgE binding to isoallergens from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) in children and adults.  
Sharp MF, Kamath SD, Koeberl M, Jerry DR, O'Hehir RE, Campbell DE, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2014 Nov;62(1):77-85
Click to view abstract

Peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy.  
Gruchalla RS, Sampson HA.
N Engl J Med 2015 May 28;372(22):2165

Allergen-induced asthmatic responses modified by a GATA3-specific DNAzyme.  
Krug N, Hohlfeld JM, Kirsten AM, Kornmann O, Beeh KM, Kappeler D, Korn S, Ignatenko S, Timmer W, Rogon C, Zeitvogel J, Zhang N, Bille J, Homburg U, Turowska A, Bachert C, Werfel T, Buhl R, R.
N Engl J Med 2015 May 21;372(21):1987-1995

Occupational asthma after exposure to ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA).  
Robitaille C, Boulet LP.
Occup Environ Med 2015 May;72(5):381

Occupational allergic bronchial asthma induced by Lallzyme EX-V, an enzymatic blend sourced from Aspergillus niger used as additive in the wine industry.  
Veza S, Rodriguez-Perez R, Carretero P, Juste S, Caballero ML.
Occup Environ Med 2015 Mar;72(3):237-238

Exposure-response relationships for inhalant wheat allergen exposure and asthma.  
Baatjies R, Meijster T, Heederik D, Jeebhay MF.
Occup Environ Med 2015 Mar;72(3):200-207

Occupational asthma to fish.  
Boulet LP, Laberge F.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Nov;71(11):804

Dampness, bacterial and fungal components in dust in primary schools and respiratory health in schoolchildren across Europe.  
Jacobs J, Borras-Santos A, Krop E, Taubel M, Leppanen H, Haverinen-Shaughnessy U, Pekkanen J, Hyvarinen A, Doekes G, Zock JP, Heederik D.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Oct;71(10):704-712

Perinatal exposure to solvents and wheezing, eczema and food allergies at age 2.  
Bajeux E, Cordier S, Garlantezec R, Monfort C, Rouget F, Pele F.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Sep;71(9):636-641

Rat-specific IgG and IgG(4) antibodies associated with inhibition of IgE-allergen complex binding in laboratory animal workers.  
Jones M, Jeal H, Schofield S, Harris JM, Shamji MH, Francis JN, Durham SR, Cullinan P.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Sep;71(9):619-623

Effectiveness of interventions to reduce flour dust exposures in supermarket bakeries in South Africa.  
Baatjies R, Meijster T, Heederik D, Sander I, Jeebhay MF.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Dec;71(12):811-818

Fussy eating and feeding difficulties in infants and toddlers consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet.  
Maslin K, Dean T, Arshad SH, Venter C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 25;

Is it possible to make a diagnosis of raw, heated and baked egg allergy in children using cut-offs? A systematic review.  
Calvani M, Arasi S, Bianchi A, Caimmi D, Cuomo B, Dondi A, Indirli GC, La GS, Panetta V, Verga MC.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 23;

A population-based study of animal component sensitization, asthma and rhinitis in schoolchildren.  
Bjerg A, Winberg A, Berthold M, Mattsson L, Borres MP, Ronmark E.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 9;

Ovalbumin-specific IgE/total IgE ratio improves the prediction of tolerance development in egg-allergic children aged >/=5 years.  
Vazquez-Ortiz M, hinena-Spera A, Giner MT, Alvaro M, Piquer M, Dominguez O, Lozano J, Jimenez-Feijoo R, Plaza AM.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 3;

Influence of age on IgE response in peanut allergic children and adolescents from the Mediterranean area.  
Garcia-Blanca A, Aranda A, Blanca-Lopez N, Perez D, Gomez F, Mayorga C, Torres MJ, az-Perales A, Perkins JR, Villalba M, Blanca M, Canto G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun 4;

Allergy in children in hand versus machine dishwashing.  
Hesselmar B, Hicke-Roberts A, Wennergren G.
Pediatrics 2015 Mar;135(3):e590-e597
Click to view abstract

Dishing it out to allergies.  
Cheng LE, Cabana MD.
Pediatrics 2015 Mar;135(3):e707-e708

Caustic ingestions mimicking anaphylaxis: case studies and literature review.  
Sherenian MG, Clee M, Schondelmeyer AC, de AA, Li J, Assa'ad A, Risma K.
Pediatrics 2015 Feb;135(2):e547-e550
Click to view abstract

Asthma and food allergy management in Chicago Public Schools.  
Gupta RS, Rivkina V, Santiago-Cardenas L, Smith B, Harvey-Gintoft B, Whyte SA.
Pediatrics 2014 Oct;134(4):729-736
Click to view abstract

The epidemiology of pollen allergy. [French]  
Charpin D, Caillaud D.
Rev Mal Respir 2014 Apr;31(4):365-374
Click to view abstract

Birch pollen allergy. [French]  
Lavaud F, Fore M, Fontaine JF, Perotin JM, de BF.
Rev Mal Respir 2014 Feb;31(2):150-161
Click to view abstract

Health impact of exposure to pollens: A review of epidemiological studies. [French]  
Caillaud D, Toloba Y, Raobison R, Besancenot JP, Thibaudon M, Martin S, Segala C.
Rev Mal Respir 2014 Feb;31(2):142-149
Click to view abstract

South African food allergy consensus document 2014.  
Levin ME, Gray CL, Goddard E, Karabus S, Kriel M, Lang AC, Manjra AI, Risenga SM, Terblanche AJ, van der Spuy DA.
S Afr Med J 2015 Jan;105(1):62-65

A dangerous exercise lessons from food-dependent anaphylaxis for the physician.  
Medveczky T.
Am J Emerg Med 2014 Oct;32(10):1296-1297

Asystole after the first dose of lansoprazole.  
Candar M, Gunes H, Boz BV, Kandis H, Kutlucan L, Saritas A.
Am J Emerg Med 2014 Oct;32(10):1302-1304

Dermatological reactions to ophthalmic preparations: more than meets the eye.  
Byrom L, Zappala T, Muir J.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 May;55(2):95-98

Suspected allergic contact dermatitis to iodopropynyl butylcarbamate in an alcohol hand rub commonly used in Australian health-care settings.  
Toholka R, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 Feb;55(1):70-71

Drug-reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.  
Fernando SL.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 Feb;55(1):15-23

Drug-induced lupus and autoimmune hepatitis secondary to infliximab for psoriasis.  
Dang LJ, Lubel JS, Gunatheesan S, Hosking P, Su J.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 Feb;55(1):75-79

Periorbital allergic contact dermatitis resulting from topical retinoic acid use.  
Anderson A, Gebauer K.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 May;55(2):152-153

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis: the big challenge.  
Bauer A.
Br J Dermatol 2014 May;170(5):1010-1011

Allergy to oxidized limonene and linalool is frequent in the U.K.  
Audrain H, Kenward C, Lovell CR, Green C, Ormerod AD, Sansom J, Chowdhury MM, Cooper SM, Johnston GA, Wilkinson M, King C, Stone N, Horne HL, Holden CR, Wakelin S, Buckley DA.
Br J Dermatol 2014 Aug;171(2):292-297

Sunscreen photopatch testing: a series of 157 children.  
Haylett AK, Chiang YZ, Nie Z, Ling TC, Rhodes LE.
Br J Dermatol 2014 Aug;171(2):370-375

Molecular characterization of contact urticaria in patients with melon allergy.  
Gandolfo-Cano M, Bartra J, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Feo-Brito F, Gomez E, Bartolome B, Munoz-Garcia E, Sanz MA, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J, Pastor-Vargas C.
Br J Dermatol 2014 Mar;170(3):651-656

Methylisothiazolinone allergy in the paediatric population: the epidemic begins?  
Patel AN, Wootton CI, English JS.
Br J Dermatol 2014 May;170(5):1200-1201

Toxic epidermal necrolysis in a patient receiving vemurafenib for treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma.  
Sinha R, Lecamwasam K, Purshouse K, Reed J, Middleton MR, Fearfield L.
Br J Dermatol 2014 Apr;170(4):997-999

Two-year follow-up survey of patients with allergic contact dermatitis from an occupational cohort: is the prognosis dependent on the omnipresence of the allergen?  
Clemmensen KK, Caroe TK, Thomsen SF, Ebbehoj NE, Agner T.
Br J Dermatol 2014 May;170(5):1100-1105

Predictors of work-related sensitisation, allergic rhinitis and asthma in early work life.  
Kellberger J, Peters-Weist AS, Heinrich S, Pfeiffer S, Vogelberg C, Roller D, Genuneit J, Weinmayr G, von ME, Heumann C, Nowak D, Radon K.
Eur Respir J 2014 Sep;44(3):657-665

Occupational irritants and asthma: an Estonian cross-sectional study of 34,000 adults.  
Dumas O, Laurent E, Bousquet J, Metspalu A, Milani L, Kauffmann F, Le MN.
Eur Respir J 2014 Sep;44(3):647-656

Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).  
Torres JA, de Las HM, Maroto AS, Vivanco F, Sastre J, Pastor-Vargas C.
J Biol Chem 2014 Aug 22;289(34):23382-23388

Primary identification, biochemical characterization, and immunologic properties of the allergenic pollen cyclophilin cat R 1.  
Ghosh D, Mueller GA, Schramm G, Edwards LL, Petersen A, London RE, Haas H, Gupta BS.
J Biol Chem 2014 Aug 1;289(31):21374-21385

Lesson of the month: extrinsic allergic (bronchiolo)alveolitis and metal working fluids.  
Cullinan P, D'Souza E, Tennant R, Barber C.
Thorax 2014 Nov;69(11):1059-1060

The clinical spectrum of pulmonary aspergillosis.  
Kosmidis C, Denning DW.
Thorax 2015 Mar;70(3):270-277

Reactivity of IgE to the allergen hyaluronidase from Polybia paulista (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) venom.  
Justo Jacomini DL, Gomes Moreira SM, Campos Pereira FD, Zollner RL, Brochetto Braga MR.
Toxicon 2014 May;82104-111
Click to view abstract

Urticarial vasculitis induced by OTC diet pills: a case report.  
Cherrez O, Loayza E, Greiding L, Calderon JC, Cherrez A, Adum F.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;8(1):12

The IgE response to Ascaris molecular components is associated with clinical indicators of asthma severity.  
Buendia E, Zakzuk J, Mercado D, Alvarez A, Caraballo L.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;8(1):8

Non-allergenic factors from pollen modulate T helper cell instructing notch ligands on dendritic cells.  
Gilles S, Beck I, Lange S, Ring J, Behrendt H, Traidl-Hoffmann C.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;8(1):2


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