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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Ige sensitization to Thaumetopoea pityocampa : diagnostic utility of a setae extract, clinical picture
Read Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) pollen allergens and cross-reactivity patterns
Read Time of onset and predictors of biphasic anaphylactic reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Read Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in atopic children with egg allergy.
Read Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.
Read Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates and childhood respiratory tract infections and allergy.
Read Contact allergy induced by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether leachables from aluminium tubes for pharmaceutical use.
Read Comprehensive metabolomics identifies the alarmin uric acid as a critical signal for the induction of peanut allergy.
Read Clinical validation of controlled grass pollen challenge in the Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU).
Read Removal of peanut allergen Ara h 1 from common hospital surfaces, toys and books using standard cleaning methods.
Read Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.
Read Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance.
Read IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma.
Read Tests for evaluating non-immediate allergic drug reactions.
Read Allergy to ortho-phthalaldehyde in the healthcare setting: advice for clinicians.

Abstracts shared in February 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.
Read Experimental hookworm infection and gluten microchallenge promote tolerance in celiac disease.
Read Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy.
Read Challenge-proven aspirin hypersensitivity in children with chronic spontaneous urticaria.
Read Natural clinical tolerance to peanut in African patients is caused by poor allergenic activity of peanut IgE.
Read Detection of relevant amounts of cow's milk protein in non-pre-packed bakery products sold as cow's milk free.
Read Anaphylaxis due to caffeine.
Read Carbohydrates as food allergens.
Read Epileptic seizures as a manifestation of cow's milk allergy: a studied relationship and description of our pediatric experience.
Read In vitro diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy and further development of component resolved diagnostics.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ige sensitization to Thaumetopoea pityocampa : diagnostic utility of a setae extract, clinical picture
Setae from Thaumetopoea pityocampa larvae (the pine processionary moth (PPM)) can induce hypersensitivity reactions, but their clinical role in IgE-mediated responses is still subject to discussion. The aim of this study was to evaluate a setae extract for in vivo and in vitro diagnosis in nonhospitalized patients with reactions to PPM. Forty-eight adult patients were studied: 47.9% had a positive SPT for PPM (70% to both extracts, 17% only to the WL extract and 13% only to the setae extract). IgE immunoblotting detected several reactive bands in 91% of the SPT-positive cases. In multivariate analysis, male sex, immediate latency (<1 h) and duration of skin symptoms (<24 h) were independent predictors of a positive SPT.

Ige sensitization to Thaumetopoea pityocampa : diagnostic utility of a setae extract, clinical picture and associated risk factors.  
Vega JM, Moneo I, Garcia-Ortiz JC, Gonzalez-Munoz M, Ruiz C, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Roques A, Vega J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):283-290

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) pollen allergens and cross-reactivity patterns
Prosopis juliflora (mesquite) pollen is one of the common causes of respiratory allergy in tropical countries. This study was designed to evaluate IgE banding proteins of mesquite pollen extract and its IgE cross-reactivity with other allergenic plants. Twenty patients with allergic symptoms and positive skin prick tests (SPT) for mesquite pollen extract participated in the study. There were several protein bands in mesquite pollen extract with the approximate range of molecular weight of 10-85 kDa. The most frequent IgE reactive bands among the patients' sera were approximately 20 and 66kDa. However, there were other IgE reactive protein bands among the patients' sera with molecular weights of 10, 15, 35, 45, 55 and 85kDa. Inhibition experiments revealed high IgE cross-reactivity between mesquite and acacia. Proteins with a molecular weight of 10 to 85 kDa are the major allergens in P. juliflora pollen extract

Immunochemical characterization of prosopis juliflora pollen allergens and evaluation of cross-reactivity pattern with the most allergenic pollens in tropical areas.  
Assarehzadegan MA, Khodadadi A, Amini A, Shakurnia AH, Marashi SS, li-Sadeghi H, Zarinhadideh F, Sepahi N.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;14(1):74-82

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Time of onset and predictors of biphasic anaphylactic reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Biphasic anaphylatic reactions were less likely among patients with food as an inciting trigger. Patients who present with hypotension or have an unknown inciting trigger may be at increased risk of a biphasic reaction. Clinicians should tailor observation periods for patients individually based on clinical characteristics

Time of onset and predictors of biphasic anaphylactic reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Lee S, Bellolio MF, Hess EP, Erwin P, Murad MH, Campbell RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Feb 11;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in atopic children with egg allergy.
Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is an intranasal vaccine recently incorporated into the United Kingdom immunization schedule. However, it contains egg protein and, in the absence of safety data, is contraindicated in patients with egg allergy. Furthermore, North American guidelines recommend against its use in asthmatic children. This studysought to assess the safety of LAIV in children with egg allergy. The study concludes that in contrast to current recommendations, LAIV appears to be safe for use in children with egg allergy. Furthermore, the vaccine appears to be well tolerated in children with a diagnosis of asthma or recurrent wheeze

Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in atopic children with egg allergy.  
Turner PJ, Southern J, Andrews NJ, Miller E, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb 1;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.
This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD

Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.  
Sicherer SH, Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):357-367

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates and childhood respiratory tract infections and allergy.
This study sought to evaluate whether prenatal exposure to BPA and phthalates increases the risk of respiratory and allergic outcomes in children at various ages from birth to 7 years, and concludes that prenatal exposure to BPA and high-molecular-weight phthalates might increase the risk of asthma symptoms and respiratory tract infections throughout childhood

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates and childhood respiratory tract infections and allergy.  
Gascon M, Casas M, Morales E, Valvi D, Ballesteros-Gomez A, Luque N, Rubio S, Monfort N, Ventura R, Martinez D, Sunyer J, Vrijheid M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):370-378

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy induced by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether leachables from aluminium tubes for pharmaceutical use.
Aluminium tubes for pharmaceutical use are internally lacquered with epoxy resins (ER) based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE). Recently, it was shown that remnants of ER polymerization like BADGE are extractable from epoxy-based coatings of commercially available tubes and may leach into semi-solid drug preparations. This study evaluated the safety of BADGE-contaminated macrogol ointments in individuals sensitized to ER based on BADGE by use tests, and concludes that elevated BADGE concentrations in ER-coated aluminium tubes pose a risk of developing contact dermatitis to patients sensitized to ER based on BADGE.

Contact allergy induced by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether leachables from aluminium tubes for pharmaceutical use.  
Breuer K, Lipperheide C, Lipke U, Zapf T, Dickel H, Treudler R, Molin S, Mahler V, Pfohler C, Loffler H, Schwantes H, Schnuch A.
Allergy 2015 Feb;70(2):220-226

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Comprehensive metabolomics identifies the alarmin uric acid as a critical signal for the induction of peanut allergy.
This study sought to identify key pathways and mediators critically involved in the induction of allergic sensitization to peanut. Comprehensive metabolomics analysis with liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry was used to detect metabolite changes in mice undergoing sensitization. Elevated levels of uric acid (UA) were detected in mice undergoing sensitization as well as in peanut allergic children who were not challenged with peanut. In mice, depletion of UA during sensitization prevented the development of peanut-specific immunoglobulins IgE and IgG1 as well as anaphylaxis while exogenous delivery of UA crystals (MSU) restored the allergic phenotype. MSU enhanced CD86 and OX40L expression on DCs, independently of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and IL-1beta, via a PI3K signaling pathway. Overproduction of the UA alarmin in the local microenvironment plays a critical role in the induction of peanut allergic sensitization, likely due to its ability to activate DCs. These finding suggest that cellular damage or tissue injury may be an essential requisite for the development of allergic sensitization to foods.

Comprehensive metabolomics identifies the alarmin uric acid as a critical signal for the induction of peanut allergy.  
Kong J, Chalcraft K, Mandur TS, Jimenez-Saiz R, Walker TD, Goncharova S, Gordon ME, Naji L, Flader K, Larche M, Chu DK, Waserman S, McCarry B, Jordana M.
Allergy 2015 Feb 3;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical validation of controlled grass pollen challenge in the Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU).
This study provides clinical validation of the ability to generate allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms amongst grass-allergic individuals in the Environmental Exposure Unit.

Clinical validation of controlled grass pollen challenge in the Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU).  
Ellis AK, Steacy LM, Hobsbawn B, Conway CE, Walker TJ.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):5

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Removal of peanut allergen Ara h 1 from common hospital surfaces, toys and books using standard cleaning methods.
Table surfaces, book covers and plastic toys can be cleaned to remove peanut allergen Ara h 1 using common household and hospital cleaning wipes. Regular cleaning of these products or cleaning prior to their use should be promoted to reduce the risk of accidental peanut exposure, especially in areas where they have been used by many children

Removal of peanut allergen Ara h 1 from common hospital surfaces, toys and books using standard cleaning methods.  
Watson WT, Woodrow A, Stadnyk AW.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):4

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.
These findings indicate that clothing type can have important implications for the colonization of other biotopes by house dust mites, with potential for affecting an individuals' personal exposure to dust mite allergens

Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.  
Clarke D, Burke D, Gormally M, Byrne M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb 10;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance.
Serious tick-induced allergies comprise mammalian meat allergy following tick bites and tick anaphylaxis. Mammalian meat allergy is an emergent allergy, increasingly prevalent in tick-endemic areas of Australia and the United States, occurring worldwide where ticks are endemic. Sensitisation to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-Gal) has been shown to be the mechanism of allergic reaction in mammalian meat allergy following tick bite. Whilst other carbohydrate allergens have been identified, this allergen is unique amongst carbohydrate food allergens in provoking anaphylaxis. Treatment of mammalian meat anaphylaxis involves avoidance of mammalian meat and mammalian derived products in those who also react to gelatine and mammalian milks.

Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance.  
van Nunen S.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Jan;5(1):3-16

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma.
The relationship between helminthiases and allergy is a matter of considerable interest and research. In the tropics house dust mite exposure, a known risk factor for asthma is frequently concurrent with helminth infections. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the IgE responses to Ascaris and its purified allergens and the risk of asthma in a tropical country. A nested case-control study was performed in 356 subjects who reported current and past asthma symptoms (asthmatics) and 435 controls that had never experienced such symptoms. Sensitization to Ascaris and D. pteronyssinus were independently associated with asthma after adjustment for age, gender, socioeconomic stratum, city and other IgE levels. There was also a significant association with sensitization to the highly allergenic and cross-reactive tropomyosins Asc l 3, Blo t 10 and Der p10 (aORs: 1.76; 95% CI 1.21-2.57, 1.64; 95% CI 1.14-2.35 and 1.51; 95% CI 1.02-2.24) respectively.

IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma.  
Ahumada V, Garcia E, Dennis R, Rojas MX, Rondon MA, Perez A, Penaranda A, Barragan AM, Jimenez S, Kennedy MW, Caraballo L.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb 19;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tests for evaluating non-immediate allergic drug reactions.
Non-immediate drug reactions (NIR) are induced by specific immunological mechanisms and involve the recognition of hapten molecules by the immune system, with the participation of dendritic cells and other antigen-presenting cells. This process is followed by an effector response that can induce several clinical entities, ranging from mild to severe. The type of immunological recognition can be used as the basis for the diagnostic approach. Both in vivo and in vitro tests are available for the diagnosis of NIR. In vivo tests consist of the reproduction of a diminished immune response with the culprit drug and in vitro tests are based on the stimulation of memory cells in culture. If both tests give negative results, a drug provocation test can be used

Tests for evaluating non-immediate allergic drug reactions.  
Perkins JR, Ariza A, Blanca M, Fernandez TD.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Nov;10(11):1475-1486

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to ortho-phthalaldehyde in the healthcare setting: advice for clinicians.
This study summarizes and reviews the available health information on ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), a recently introduced and widespread disinfectant for heat-sensitive medical equipment, particularly focusing on its possible immunological effects in the healthcare setting. OPA properties derived from laboratory and clinical studies, and in vivo and in vitro tests for the diagnosis of OPA allergy are described. The available evidence suggests the spreading of OPA as disinfectant in endoscopy units despite the little available scientific evidence on its safety. Indeed, some papers reported on serious adverse reactions to OPA in patients and, to a lesser extent, in exposed workers, and in vivo studies suggested that OPA is a dermal and respiratory sensitizer.

Allergy to ortho-phthalaldehyde in the healthcare setting: advice for clinicians.  
Pala G, Moscato G.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Mar;9(3):227-234

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Drug and vaccine allergy.  
Kelso JM.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 Feb;35(1):221-230
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and urticaria.  
Williams KW, Sharma HP.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 Feb;35(1):199-219
Click to view abstract

Potential treatments for food allergy.  
Albin S, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 Feb;35(1):77-100
Click to view abstract

Optimizing the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Kattan JD, Sicherer SH.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 Feb;35(1):61-76
Click to view abstract

Food allergy: epidemiology and natural history.  
Savage J, Johns CB.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 Feb;35(1):45-59
Click to view abstract

Ige sensitization to Thaumetopoea pityocampa : diagnostic utility of a setae extract, clinical picture and associated risk factors.  
Vega JM, Moneo I, Garcia-Ortiz JC, Gonzalez-Munoz M, Ruiz C, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Roques A, Vega J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):283-290
Click to view abstract

Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.  
Cantillo JF, Fernandez-Caldas E, Puerta L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):271-282
Click to view abstract

Characteristics of 26 kDa antigen of H. Pylori by Monoclonal Antibody.  
Ghahremani H, Farshad S, Amini NH, Kashanian S, Momeni Moghaddam MA, Moradi N, Paknejad M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;14(1):113-119
Click to view abstract

Immunochemical characterization of prosopis juliflora pollen allergens and evaluation of cross-reactivity pattern with the most allergenic pollens in tropical areas.  
Assarehzadegan MA, Khodadadi A, Amini A, Shakurnia AH, Marashi SS, li-Sadeghi H, Zarinhadideh F, Sepahi N.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;14(1):74-82
Click to view abstract

Cotinine level is associated with asthma severity in passive smoker children.  
Hassanzad M, Khalilzadeh S, Eslampanah NS, Bloursaz M, Sharifi H, Mohajerani SA, Tashayoie NS, Velayati AA.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;14(1):67-73
Click to view abstract

Systemic mastocytosis presenting as IgE-mediated food-induced anaphylaxis: a report of two cases.  
Prieto-Garcia A, varez-Perea A, Matito A, Sanchez-Munoz L, Morgado JM, Escribano L, varez-Twose I.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Feb 13;

Incidence of suspected perioperative anaphylaxis-a multicenter snapshot study.  
Savic LC, Kaura V, Yusaf M, Hammond-Jones AM, Jackson R, Howell S, Savic S, Hopkins PM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Feb 13;

Time of onset and predictors of biphasic anaphylactic reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Lee S, Bellolio MF, Hess EP, Erwin P, Murad MH, Campbell RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Feb 11;
Click to view abstract

Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in atopic children with egg allergy.  
Turner PJ, Southern J, Andrews NJ, Miller E, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb 1;
Click to view abstract

IgG inhibits peanut-induced basophil and mast cell activation in peanut-tolerant children sensitized to peanut major allergens.  
Santos AF, James LK, Bahnson HT, Shamji MH, Couto-Francisco NC, Islam S, Houghton S, Clark AT, Stephens A, Turcanu V, Durham SR, Gould HJ, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb 7;
Click to view abstract

Correlation of sensitizing capacity and T-cell recognition within the Bet v 1 family.  
Kitzmuller C, Zulehner N, Roulias A, Briza P, Ferreira F, Fae I, Fischer GF, Bohle B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb 7;
Click to view abstract

Studies of house dust mites can now fully embrace the '-omics' era.  
Stewart GA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):549-550

Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.  
Sicherer SH, Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):357-367
Click to view abstract

The future of biologics: Applications for food allergy.  
Bauer RN, Manohar M, Singh AM, Jay DC, Nadeau KC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):312-323
Click to view abstract

Clinical relevance of the Hevea brasiliensis lipid transfer protein Hev b 12.  
Faber MA, Sabato V, Bridts CH, Nayak A, Beezhold DH, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 30;

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates and childhood respiratory tract infections and allergy.  
Gascon M, Casas M, Morales E, Valvi D, Ballesteros-Gomez A, Luque N, Rubio S, Monfort N, Ventura R, Martinez D, Sunyer J, Vrijheid M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):370-378
Click to view abstract

Changes in peanut allergy prevalence in different ethnic groups in 2 time periods.  
Fox AT, Kaymakcalan H, Perkin M, Du TG, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):580-582

Experimental hookworm infection and gluten microchallenge promote tolerance in celiac disease.  
Croese J, Giacomin P, Navarro S, Clouston A, McCann L, Dougall A, Ferreira I, Susianto A, O'Rourke P, Howlett M, McCarthy J, Engwerda C, Jones D, Loukas A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;135(2):508-516
Click to view abstract

Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy.  
Du Toit G, Roberts G, Sayre PH, Bahnson HT, Radulovic S, Santos AF, Brough HA, Phippard D, Basting M, Feeney M, Turcanu V, Sever ML, Gomez Lorenzo M, Plaut M, Lack G; LEAP Study Team.
N Engl J Med 2015 Feb 26;372(9):803-13.
Abstract

Long-lasting non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal cow's milk allergy in infants with Down syndrome.  
Wakiguchi H, Hasegawa S, Kaneyasu H, Kajimoto M, Fujimoto Y, Hirano R, Katsura S, Matsumoto K, Ichiyama T, Ohga S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Feb 18;
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Immunomodulating properties of protein hydrolysates for application in cow's milk allergy.  
Kiewiet MB, Gros M, van NJ, Faas MM, de VP.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Feb 18;
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy induced by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether leachables from aluminium tubes for pharmaceutical use.  
Breuer K, Lipperheide C, Lipke U, Zapf T, Dickel H, Treudler R, Molin S, Mahler V, Pfohler C, Loffler H, Schwantes H, Schnuch A.
Allergy 2015 Feb;70(2):220-226
Click to view abstract

Challenge-proven aspirin hypersensitivity in children with chronic spontaneous urticaria.  
Cavkaytar O, Arik YE, Buyuktiryaki B, Sekerel BE, Sackesen C, Soyer OU.
Allergy 2015 Feb;70(2):153-160
Click to view abstract

Natural clinical tolerance to peanut in African patients is caused by poor allergenic activity of peanut IgE.  
Wollmann E, Hamsten C, Sibanda E, Ochome M, Focke-Tejkl M, Asarnoj A, Onell A, Lilja G, Gallerano D, Lupinek C, Thalhamer T, Weiss R, Thalhamer J, Wickman M, Valenta R, van Hage M.
Allergy 2015 Feb 13;
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Detection of relevant amounts of cow's milk protein in non-pre-packed bakery products sold as cow's milk free.  
Trendelenburg V, Enzian N, Bellach J, Schnadt S, Niggemann B, Beyer K.
Allergy 2015 Feb 4;
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Skin tests in patients with hypersensitivity reaction to iodinated contrast media: A meta-analysis.  
Yoon SH, Lee SY, Kang HR, Kim JY, Hahn SK, Park CM, Chang YS, Goo JM, Cho SH.
Allergy 2015 Feb 3;
Click to view abstract

Comprehensive metabolomics identifies the alarmin uric acid as a critical signal for the induction of peanut allergy.  
Kong J, Chalcraft K, Mandur TS, Jimenez-Saiz R, Walker TD, Goncharova S, Gordon ME, Naji L, Flader K, Larche M, Chu DK, Waserman S, McCarry B, Jordana M.
Allergy 2015 Feb 3;
Click to view abstract

Removal of peanut allergen Ara h 1 from common hospital surfaces, toys and books using standard cleaning methods.  
Watson WT, Woodrow A, Stadnyk AW.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):4
Click to view abstract

The mamey sapote fruit (Pouteria sapota) as a novel cause of IgE-mediated allergic reaction.  
Crans YA, Lin CK, Sheikh J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb 19;

Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.  
Clarke D, Burke D, Gormally M, Byrne M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb 10;
Click to view abstract

Treatment of allergic reactions and quality of life among caregivers of food-allergic children.  
Ward CE, Greenhawt MJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb 5;
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Allergen of the month-sandbar willow.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;114(2):A21

Mold allergy revisited.  
Portnoy JM, Jara D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Feb;114(2):83-89

Anaphylaxis due to caffeine.  
Sugiyama K, Cho T, Tatewaki M, Onishi S, Yokoyama T, Yoshida N, Fujimatsu T, Hirata H, Fukuda T, Fukushima Y.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Jan;5(1):55-56
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Carbohydrates as food allergens.  
Soh JY, Huang CH, Lee BW.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Jan;5(1):17-24
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Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance.  
van Nunen S.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Jan;5(1):3-16
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Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food: a systematic literature review.  
Versluis A, Knulst AC, Kruizinga AG, Michelsen A, Houben GF, Baumert JL, van Os-Medendorp H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb;45(2):347-367
Click to view abstract

IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma.  
Ahumada V, Garcia E, Dennis R, Rojas MX, Rondon MA, Perez A, Penaranda A, Barragan AM, Jimenez S, Kennedy MW, Caraballo L.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb 19;
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Defintion of a pool of epitopes that recapitulates the T cell reactivity against major house dust mite allergens.  
Hinz D, Oseroff C, Pham J, Sidney J, Peters B, Sette A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb 5;
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Management of allergy to penicillins and other beta-lactams.  
Mirakian R, Leech SC, Krishna MT, Richter AG, Huber PA, Farooque S, Khan N, Pirmohamed M, Clark AT, Nasser SM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb;45(2):300-327
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Influence of the route of exposure and the matrix on the sensitisation potency of a major cows' milk allergen.  
Wavrin S, Bernard H, Wal JM, del-Patient K.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;5(1):3
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Challenges for allergy diagnosis in regions with complex pollen exposures.  
Barber D, az-Perales A, Villalba M, Chivato T.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Feb;15(2):496
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Innate responses to pollen allergens.  
Hosoki K, Boldogh I, Sur S.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Feb;15(1):79-88
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Fish-allergic patients may be able to eat fish.  
Mourad AA, Bahna SL.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Feb 10;1-12

Domestic exposure to volatile organic compounds in relation to asthma and allergy in children and adults.  
Tagiyeva N, Sheikh A.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Dec;10(12):1611-1639

Epileptic seizures as a manifestation of cow's milk allergy: a studied relationship and description of our pediatric experience.  
Falsaperla R, Pavone P, Miceli SS, Mahmood F, Scalia F, Corsello G, Lubrano R, Vitaliti G.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Dec;10(12):1597-1609

Tests for evaluating non-immediate allergic drug reactions.  
Perkins JR, Ariza A, Blanca M, Fernandez TD.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Nov;10(11):1475-1486

Hypersensitivities to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  
Mourad AA, Bahna SL.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Sep;10(9):1263-1268

Recommendations for the management of food allergies in a preschool/childcare setting and prevention of anaphylaxis.  
Ford LS, Turner PJ, Campbell DE.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Jul;10(7):867-874

Fungus-associated asthma: overcoming challenges in diagnosis and treatment.  
Ogawa H, Fujimura M, Ohkura N, Satoh K, Makimura K.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 May;10(5):647-656

In vitro diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy and further development of component resolved diagnostics.  
Ebo DG, Van VM, de G, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Sabato V.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Mar;10(3):375-384

Diagnosis of cow's milk allergy in children: determining the gold standard?  
Dupont C.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Feb;10(2):257-267

Dietary therapies for eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Arias A, Lucendo AJ.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;10(1):133-142

Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmune disorders in children: an update.  
Diamanti A, Capriati T, Bizzarri C, Panetta F, Ferretti F, Ancinelli M, Romano F, Locatelli M.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Dec;9(12):1289-1301

Prediction of hypersensitivity to antibiotics: what factors need to be considered?  
Ariza A, Fernandez TD, Mayorga C, Blanca M, Torres MJ.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Dec;9(12):1279-1288

The case for measuring antibodies to specific citrullinated antigens.  
Montgomery AB, Venables PJ, Fisher BA.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Dec;9(12):1185-1192

Prevention of anaphylaxis in healthcare settings.  
Worth A, Sheikh A.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Sep;9(9):855-869

Recent advances in the diagnosis and therapy of peanut allergy.  
Sheikh SZ, Burks AW.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Jun;9(6):551-560

Emerging concepts of dietary therapy for pediatric and adult eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Davis BP, Rothenberg ME.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;9(4):285-287

Allergy to ortho-phthalaldehyde in the healthcare setting: advice for clinicians.  
Pala G, Moscato G.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2013 Mar;9(3):227-234


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