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 Allergy Advisor Digest - January 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Food allergy preceded by contact urticaria due to the same food: Involvement of epicutaneous sensitization in food allergy.
Read In vivo diagnosis of allergic diseases - allergen provocation tests.
Read IgE recognition patterns in peanut allergy are age dependent: perspectives of the EuroPrevall study.
Read Epidemiology of childhood peanut allergy.
Read Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.
Read A case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish
Read Significance of 40-, 45-, and 48-kDa proteins in the moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms of buckwheat allergy.
Read Asian sand dust aggregate causes atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in Nc/Nga mice.
Read IgE-binding properties of a recombinant lipid transfer protein from Cannabis sativa.
Read Goji berry: a potential new player in latex-food syndrome.
Read Mixing compatibilities of Aspergillus and American cockroach allergens with other high-protease fungal and insect extracts.
Read Intractable shellfish anaphylaxis: sensitization by cross-reactive substances in a complementary 'immune stimulant' and acrylic nails.
Read Positive house dust mite skin test in a nonatopic patient with scabies.
Read Two cases of allergies due to anisakis simplex, positive to specific ige for Ani s 12 allergen.
Read Evaluation of the allergenicity of beta-casein in Japanese children with cow milk allergy by using the basophil activation test.
Read Pet ownership is associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma and reduced risk of atopy in childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort.
Read Carbohydrates as allergens.
Read Urticaria. Sometimes IgE-mediated?
Read An immunodiagnostic assay for quantitation of specific IgE to the major pollen allergen component, Pas n 1, of the subtropical bahia grass.
Read Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.
Read Conjunctival provocation tests: a predictive factor for patients' seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms.
Read A pitfall to avoid when using an allergen microarray: the incidental detection of IgE to unexpected allergens.
Read A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome to mushrooms challenging currently used diagnostic criteria.
Read The development of IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity after the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis to the same food.
Read Fixed food eruption caused by peanut and cashew
Read Increasing rate of hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in Italian children.
Read How much is too much?: Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens.
Read Distinct parameters of the basophil activation test reflect the severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut.
Read Environmental lead exposure and increased risk for total and allergen-specific IgE in US adults.
Read Casein-related anaphylaxis after use of an Everlast kickboxing glove.
Read Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.
Read Anaphylactic shock to anti-tuberculosis drugs.
Read Allergy to house dust mites: from diagnosis to management
Read Evaluation of cross-sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and components

Abstracts shared in January 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Anaphylactic shock to raspberry.
Read Severe biphasic anaphylaxis to bigarreau cherry in a child
Read Cross-reactivity between the soybean protein p34 and bovine caseins.
Read Allergy to sunflower seed and sunflower butter as proposed vehicle for sensitization.
Read 'Tahini' sauce: new allergenic source to evaluate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to sesame?
Read Allergic reaction and sensitization to antibiotic in a blueberry pie.
Read Component-resolved diagnosis of baker's allergy based on specific IgE to recombinant wheat flour proteins.
Read A new allergenic source: sensitisation to Goji berries (Lycium barbarum).
Read Molecular characterization of allergens in raw and processed kiwifruit.
Read Wheat allergy in children evaluated with challenge and IgE antibodies to wheat components.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy preceded by contact urticaria due to the same food: Involvement of epicutaneous sensitization in food allergy.
This study concludes that epicutaneous sensitization of foods could induce food allergy under occupational cooking and skin-care treatment with foods in adults. The study clarified the role of epicutaneous sensitization in food allergy, and investigated the clinical characteristics of adult patients with food allergies preceded by contact urticaria due to the same foods. 15 patients (20-51 years of age; 5 men and 10 women), who had food allergies preceded by contact urticaria, were investigated. 14 patients experienced contact urticaria due to the causative foods during occupationally cooking, whereas 1 patient during face pack. In the occupational group, causative foods included rice, wheat, fruits, vegetables, fish, shrimp and cuttlefish; in the fresh cucumber paste case the cause was cucumber.

Food allergy preceded by contact urticaria due to the same food: Involvement of epicutaneous sensitization in food allergy.  
Inomata N, Nagashima M, Hakuta A, Aihara M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):73-78

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vivo diagnosis of allergic diseases - allergen provocation tests.
In most of the cases the standard diagnosis of an allergic disease is based on a detailed clinical history and demonstration of sensitisation (either by skin test or in vitro testing) to a relevant allergen concordant with the history. The allergen provocation test is rarely required. However, the history of allergy diagnosis started with the patch test (1894), which is essentially a provocation test. Systematically applied allergen challenges followed, with the introduction of conjunctival (1907), nasal (1914) and bronchial provocation (1925). Besides being a diagnostic tool the allergen provocation is a long-standing model for studying the mechanisms of allergic diseases or the efficacy of antiallergic drugs. Due to safety issues and lack of standardisation in conjunction with increased availability of high quality reagents for skin tests or in vitro diagnosis the allergen challenge was almost abandoned from daily practice and reserved for research purposes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

In vivo diagnosis of allergic diseases - allergen provocation tests.  
Agache I, Bilo M, Braunstahl GJ, Delgado L, Demoly P, Eigenmann P, Gevaert P, Gomes E, Hellings P, Horak F, Muraro A, Werfel T, Marek J.
Allergy 2015 Jan 30;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE recognition patterns in peanut allergy are age dependent: perspectives of the EuroPrevall study.
This study tested the hypothesis that specific molecular sensitization patterns correlate with the clinical data/manifestation in a European peanut allergic population characterized under a common protocol. 68 peanut allergic subjects and 82 tolerant controls from 11 European countries were included. Allergy to peanut and lowest symptom-eliciting-dose were established by double-blind placebo-controlled food-challenge in all but anaphylactic subjects. Information of early or late (before or after 14 years of age) onset of peanut allergy was obtained from standardized questionnaires. IgE to peanut allergens rAra h 1-3, 6, 8-9, profilin and CCD were determined using ImmunoCAP. 78% of peanut allergics were sensitised to peanut extract and 90% to at least one peanut component. rAra h 2 was the sole major allergen for the peanut allergic population. Geographic differences were observed for rAra h 8 and rAra h 9, which were major allergens for central/western and southern Europeans, respectively. Sensitisation to rAra h 1 and 2 were exclusively observed in early onset peanut allergy. Peanut tolerant subjects were frequently sensitised to rAra h 8 or 9 but not to storage proteins. Sensitisation to Ara h 2 >/=1.0 kUA /L conferred a 97% probability for a systemic reaction (p=0.0002). Logistic regression revealed a significant influence of peanut extract sensitization and region on the occurrence of systemic reactions (p=0.0185 and p=0.0436 respectively). Sensitization to Ara h 1, 2 and 3 is usually acquired in childhood. IgE to Ara h 2 >/=1.0 kUA /L is significantly associated with the development of systemic reactions to peanut.

IgE recognition patterns in peanut allergy are age dependent: perspectives of the EuroPrevall study.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Lidholm J, Fernandez-Rivas M, Seneviratne S, Hanschmann KM, Vogel L, Bures P, Fritsche P, Summers C, Knulst AC, Le TM, Reig I, Papadopoulos NG, Sinaniotis A, Belohlavkova .
Allergy 2015 Jan 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epidemiology of childhood peanut allergy.
The authors state that although peanut allergy is among the most common food allergies, no study has comprehensively described the epidemiology of the condition among the general pediatric population. Their objective was to better characterize peanut allergy prevalence, diagnosis trends, and reaction history among affected children identified from a representative sample of United States households with children. A randomized, cross sectional survey was administered to parents from June 2009 to February 2010. Data from 38,480 parents were collected and analyzed in regard to demographics, allergic symptoms associated with food ingestion, and methods of food allergy diagnosis. Of the 3218 children identified with food allergy, 754 (24.8%) were reported to have a peanut allergy. Peanut allergy was reported most often among 6- to 10-year-old children (25.5%), white children (47.7%), and children from households with an annual income of $50,000-$99,999 (41.7%). Although peanut allergy was diagnosed by a physician in 76% of cases, significantly more peanut allergy reactions were severe as compared with reactions to other foods (53.7% versus 41.0%). Parents were significantly less likely to report tolerance to peanut as compared with the odds of tolerance reported for other foods (odds ratio 0.7). Childhood peanut allergy, which represents nearly a quarter of all food allergy, presents more severe reactions and is least likely to be outgrown. Although it is diagnosed by a physician in nearly three-fourths of all cases, socioeconomic disparities in regard to diagnosis persist.

Epidemiology of childhood peanut allergy.  
Dyer AA, Rivkina V, Perumal D, Smeltzer BM, Smith BM, Gupta RS.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jan;36(1):58-64

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.
Because of widespread use, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most common cause of all adverse drug reactions, with hypersensitivity reported in approximately 1% of the population. NSAID hypersensitivity can be categorized into five types by the underlying disease, symptoms of reaction, and timing of reaction. These include rhinitis and asthma induced by NSAIDs (also known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (NECD), urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, single NSAID-induced reactions, and delayed NSAID reactions. NECD occurs in one-third of patients with chronic urticaria who develop an exacerbation of their urticaria, sometimes with angioedema, typically beginning 30-90 minutes after ingestion of NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. In urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, patients without underlying disease develop urticaria or angioedema 30-90 minutes after ingestion of COX-1-inhibiting NSAIDs including aspirin. Single NSAID-induced reactions are immediate and specific to a single NSAID and are thought to occur because of an IgE-mediated reaction against a specific epitope of the NSAID. Delayed NSAID reactions occur days to weeks after initiating an NSAID. These are T-cell mediated and not amenable to desensitization or rechallenge. Classifying the type of NSAID hypersensitivity is important because many patients with a prior history of urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs will often tolerate aspirin test dose. This would allow the use of an aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease despite a presumed history of NSAID hypersensitivity

Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.  
Saff RR, Banerji A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jan;36(1):34-39

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish
Young radish, a member of the mustard family (Cruciferae), is a common ingredient of Kimchi. A case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish is described in a 46-year-old female. She presented with dizziness, generalized eruption and gastrointestinal upset. Her symptoms developed after re-exposure to young radish while chopping it. Hypotensive blood pressures were noted. Three days prior, the patient had experienced generalized urticaria with pruritus immediately after chopping the fresh young radish, which resolved spontaneously. In the ER, her symptoms improved by the administration of epinephrine (0.3 mL), antihistamine (chlorpheniramine) and isotonic saline hydration. A skin prick test with young radish extract showed positive reactivity.

A case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish (Raphanus sativus l).  
Lee YH, Lee JH, Kang HR, Ha JH, Lee BH, Kim SH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):95-97

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Significance of 40-, 45-, and 48-kDa proteins in the moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms of buckwheat allergy.
This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between the allergen components and moderate-to-severe allergic reactions in patients with buckwheat allergy. Fifteen patients with a history of buckwheat ingestion and a buckwheat specific IgE level>/=0.35 kU/L were enrolled. They were divided into 2 groups according to clinical severity scores, with 0-1 being asymptomatic-to-mild and 2-4 being moderate-to-severe symptoms. The proportions of positive band to the 16 kDa (62.5% vs 0%, P=0.026) and 40-50 kDa (87.5% vs 28.6%, P=0.041) buckwheat allergens in the grade 2-4 group were higher than those in grade 0-1 group. The level of buckwheat specific IgE of grade 2-4 group was higher than that of grade 0-1 group (41.3 kU/L vs 5.5 kU/L, P=0.037). The median optical densities (ODs) of IgE antibody binding to 40-50 kDa protein were higher in the grade 2-4 group, compared with those in the grade 0-1 group (130% OD vs 60.8% OD, P=0.037). Therefore the 40-50 kDa protein is implicated as an important allergen to predict moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms in Korean children with buckwheat allergy.

Significance of 40-, 45-, and 48-kDa proteins in the moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms of buckwheat allergy.  
Cho J, Lee JO, Choi J, Park MR, Shon DH, Kim J, Ahn K, Han Y.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):37-43

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Asian sand dust aggregate causes atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in Nc/Nga mice.
Asian sand dust (ASD) originates from the arid and semiarid areas of China, and epidemiologic studies have shown that ASD exposure is associated with various allergic and respiratory symptoms. However, few studies have been performed to assess the relationship between skin inflammation and ASD exposure. This study investigated the effect of ASD on mice. ASD alone did not cause AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. However, AD-like symptoms induced by Dermatophagoides farinae extract (Df), a major allergen, were enhanced by adding ASD. This data suggest that it is likely that ASD may contribute to the exacerbation of not only respiratory symptoms, but also skin diseases, in susceptible individuals.

Asian sand dust aggregate causes atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in Nc/Nga mice.  
Takeshita S, Tokunaga T, Tanabe Y, Arinami T, Ichinose T, Noguchi E.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):3

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE-binding properties of a recombinant lipid transfer protein from Cannabis sativa.
IgE-binding properties of a recombinant lipid transfer protein from Cannabis sativa is described in this study. rCan s 3 was expressed in E. coli. The IgE-binding properties of rCan s 3 were tested in 16 serum samples (6 from Spain and 10 from Germany) of persons with allergic symptoms to Cannabis. IgE-inhibition experiments were performed in 2 Spanish and 2 German serum samples. Twelve of 16 serum samples (75%) with symptoms to Cannabis displayed Cannabis sIgE antibodies (0.42 -31.80 kU/L). The remaining 4 serum samples without Cannabis sIgE (25%) belonged to the German group. Five serum samples displayed sIgE to rCan s 3 (31.3%; range, 0.40 - 14.10 kUA/L) and also had positive sIgE values for the LTP of peach Pru p 3 (range, 0.60 - 26.4 kUA/L). Two serum samples belonged to the Spanish group and 3 to the German group. Maltose-binding protein rCan s 3 inhibited sIgE binding to Cannabis CAP by 24% to 50% and the sIgE to rPru p 3 by 16% to 49%. In summary, 5 of 16 symptomatic individuals (31%) had sIgE to rCan s 3.

IgE-binding properties of a recombinant lipid transfer protein from Cannabis sativa.  
Rihs HP, Armentia A, Sander I, Bruning T, Raulf M, Varga R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jun 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Goji berry: a potential new player in latex-food syndrome.
Goji berry may be a potential new player in latex-food syndrome. A 40-year-old woman who presented with immediate pharyngeal pruritus after Goji berry ingestion. She had also experienced allergy (pruritus and hives) to fruits, latex, king prawn, and nuts. Skin prick tests were performed with a thorough battery of foods. Prick by prick skin tests with Goji berries extract were positive. Protein bands ranging from 12 to 150 kDa were obtained from the berry, the most prominent of which were at 17, 25, 35, 38, 44, 60 to 75, and 150 kDa approximately. Speci?c IgE-binding bands were obtained with molecular weight of 35 and 60 kDa from Goji extract. The protein of 60 kDa was identi?ed as a beta-glucosidase and the 35 kDa protein was identi?ed as an enolase. These 2 proteins has been identi?ed previously as allergens in latex allergy.

Goji berry: a potential new player in latex-food syndrome.  
Gamez C, Marchan E, Miguel L, Sanz V, Del P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Mar;110(3):206-207

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mixing compatibilities of Aspergillus and American cockroach allergens with other high-protease fungal and insect extracts.
Recent studies have shown that Alternaria and German cockroach allergens can be degraded by endogenous proteases from other insect and fungal extracts when combined for immunotherapy, but data supporting the compatibilities of other high-protease products in comparable mixtures have not been reported. This study evaluated the stabilities and compatibilities of Aspergillus fumigatus and American cockroach allergens after mixing with protease-rich extracts from other insects or fungi at concentrations similar to those recommended for subcutaneous immunotherapy and concludes that moderate to high recoveries of Aspergillus extract activities were retained in control samples and extract mixtures under all conditions examined. American cockroach extract controls were partly degraded at 10% to 25% glycerin, and cockroach allergen compatibilities were decreased significantly in mixtures with several fungal extracts at 25% glycerin. Mixing with other insects did not compromise the stability of American cockroach allergens at 25% to 50% glycerin.

Mixing compatibilities of Aspergillus and American cockroach allergens with other high-protease fungal and insect extracts.  
Grier TJ, Hall DM, Duncan EA, Coyne TC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan 8;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Intractable shellfish anaphylaxis: sensitization by cross-reactive substances in a complementary 'immune stimulant' and acrylic nails.
A 46-year-old female with known allergy to shrimp who experienced life-disrupting recurrent hoarseness, chest tightness, and generalized urticaria interspersed with 20 episodes of anaphylaxis over 30 months. Most episodes had no identi?ed trigger. She had a normal random serum tryptase, positive skin prick test to shrimp, and negative serum speci?c immunoglobulin E (IgE) for latex, wheat, and omega-5-gliadin. Further testing con?rmed serum IgE reactivity to crustacea (shrimp, 3.63 kUA/L; crab, 5.55 kUA/L; and lobster, 3.43 kUA/L. At consultation, acrylic sculpted ?ngernails were noted, and detailed history revealed daily ingestion of “immune stimulant” powder. The “immune stimulant contained, among other, glucosamine hydrochloride (from shrimp). Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetyl-D-glucos- amine, provides structural rigidity to crustacean coats and has wide use in products including nail lacquer and glues as a copolymer with methacrylates. IgE cross-reactivity to chitin-associated substances to which this patient was clinically reactive to was demonstrated.

Intractable shellfish anaphylaxis: sensitization by cross-reactive substances in a complementary 'immune stimulant' and acrylic nails.  
Rolland JM, Varese N, Zubrinich CM, O'Hehir RE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Mar;110(3):211-212

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Positive house dust mite skin test in a nonatopic patient with scabies.
A 21-year-old nonatopic man with an intensely pruritic eruption on his trunk and bilateral upper and lower extremities for the past 7 months, deteriorated on oral steroids with the skin eruption becaming more widespread with more intense pruritus. A positive skin test reaction to house dust mite resulted in referral to a dermatology clinic to rule out scabies. Skin biopsy were diagnostic of scabies. It is important that allergists be aware of the antigenic cross-reactivity between house dust and scabies mites and its implications.

Positive house dust mite skin test in a nonatopic patient with scabies.  
Bajoghli AA, Bajoghli M, Adler S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Dec;113(6):667

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two cases of allergies due to anisakis simplex, positive to specific ige for Ani s 12 allergen.
Two cases of immediate allergy to Anisakis after ingestion of seafood. In case 1, after ingestion of flatfish, sea bream and mackerel, wheals and dyspnea occurred. ImmunoCAP was class 5 for Anisakis. ELISA for specific IgE showed that the patient serum strongly reacted to Ani s 12. In case 2, after ingestion of flatfish and yellowtail, pruritus and dyspnea occurred. ImmunoCAP was class 6 for Anisakis. ELISA for specific IgE showed that the patient serum reacted to Ani s 1, 4, 6 and 12. In both cases, skin prick tests were negative for suspected seafoods. These data suggests the possibility Ani s 12 is a major allergen of Anisakis allergy besides Ani s 1, 2 and 7. Ani s 12 is an allergen that was first reported in 2011. The reactivity of Ani s 12 specific IgE with ELISA may become useful for the diagnosis of Anisakis allergy.

Two cases of allergies due to anisakis simplex, positive to specific ige for Ani s 12 allergen. [Japanese]  
Kinoshita Y, Fujimoto K, Lee M, Shinohara R, Kobayashi Y, Kawana S, Saeki H.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1348-1352

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of the allergenicity of beta-casein in Japanese children with cow milk allergy by using the basophil activation test.
Among the casein components, alphas-casein (alphas-CAS) is considered the major allergen in Japan, and there are very few reports on the allergenicity of beta-casein (beta-CAS). In this study, the allergenicity of beta-CAS was compared with that of alphas-CAS in Japanese children with cow milk allergy (CMA). BAT results for CM were positive in 93.1% of the CMA patients. The results of the beta-CAS-BAT and alphas-CAS-BAT were found to be positive in 86.2% and 69.0% of the CMA patients, respectively, however, the difference was not significant. These results suggest that the allergenicities of beta-CAS and alphas-CAS are similar in Japanese patients with CMA.

Evaluation of the allergenicity of beta-casein in Japanese children with cow milk allergy by using the basophil activation test. [Japanese]  
Ito Y, Shimomura M, Tokunaga F, Meguro T, Seto S, Hashiguchi A, Kimura M.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1330-1337

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pet ownership is associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma and reduced risk of atopy in childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort.
Pet ownership during pregnancy and childhood in this birth cohort was consistently associated with a reduced risk of aeroallergen sensitization and atopic asthma at the age of 7, but tended to be associated (particularly for rabbits and rodents) with an increased risk of non-atopic asthma. The opposing effects on atopy vs. non-atopic asthma might be considered by parents when they are deciding whether to acquire a pet

Pet ownership is associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma and reduced risk of atopy in childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort.  
Collin SM, Granell R, Westgarth C, Murray J, Paul E, Sterne JA, John HA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jan;45(1):200-210

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Carbohydrates as allergens.
Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition

Carbohydrates as allergens.  
Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jan;15(1):492

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Urticaria. Sometimes IgE-mediated?
There are specific diagnostic recommendations for approaching chronic spontaneous urticaria, physical urticaria and special forms of urticaria. They include the detection of subclinical viral and bacterial infections, particularly with Helicobacter pylori. Frequently an autoimmune urticaria is diagnosed by using the autologous serum test. Less specific findings, such as leukocytosis and elevated CRP can sometimes be helpful in suggesting subclinical infections as the cause of acute urticaria; usually no further procedures are recommended. However, in cases with a long history of intermittent attacks, particularly with severe and generalized symptoms, it is recommended to look for IgE-mediated reactions (e.g. alpha-Gal, Omega-5-Gliadin).

Urticaria. Sometimes IgE-mediated?. [German]  
Wieczorek D, Langhorst J, Kapp A, Wedi B.
Hautarzt 2013 Sep;64(9):644-649

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An immunodiagnostic assay for quantitation of specific IgE to the major pollen allergen component, Pas n 1, of the subtropical bahia grass.
This study reports on the development of an assay for specific IgE to the major molecular allergenic component, Pas n 1, of Bahia grass pollen (BaGP), which would have immunodiagnostic utility for patients with pollen allergy in these regions.

An immunodiagnostic assay for quantitation of specific IgE to the major pollen allergen component, Pas n 1, of the subtropical bahia grass.  
Timbrell VL, Riebelt L, Simmonds C, Solley G, Smith WB, lean-Tooke A, van NS, Smith PK, Upham JW, Langguth D, Davies JM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):219-228

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.
The aim of this study was to show the sensitivity and specificity of an allergy work-up that included a 5-day drug provocation test (DPT) in children with histories of nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin through focusing on a pediatric population with histories of immediate and nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin. According to these results, a long-term DPT protocol increases the sensitivity of the allergy work-up, and it should be recommended for patients with a history of amoxicillin nonimmediate reaction

Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.  
Mori F, Cianferoni A, Barni S, Pucci N, Rossi ME, Novembre E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Conjunctival provocation tests: a predictive factor for patients' seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms.
The purpose of these studies was to prove a correlation between preseasonal conjunctival allergen challenge and coseasonal primary clinical endpoints using the total combined score, ie, a combination of symptoms and medication score, as the primary outcome parameter. The study concludes that when comparing patients based on their reaction to allergen challenge after immunotherapy, each study leads to similarly significant results. Therefore, conjunctival allergen challenge can be used effectively as a parameter to predict allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms during the season in patients treated with preseasonal sublingual immunotherapy tablets. Whether this can be transferred to untreated patients needs to be determined

Conjunctival provocation tests: a predictive factor for patients' seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms.  
Kruse K, Gerwin E, Eichel A, Shah-Hosseini K, Mosges R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 22;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A pitfall to avoid when using an allergen microarray: the incidental detection of IgE to unexpected allergens.
The advantages of such component-resolved diagnosis can be summarized as follows: (1) the ability to identify the truly responsible allergens in polysensitized patients, whether they be genuine (causing specific sensitization to their corresponding allergen source) or primary (the original sensitizing molecule); (2) distinguishing these allergens from simply cross-reactive components; (3) improving the appropriateness of the prescribed specific immunotherapy; and (4) identifying a risk profile for food allergens. Component-resolved diagnosis is performed using either a singleplex platform or a multiplex (multiple assays per sample) platform. Using an immuno solid-phase allergen chip microarray that falls into the latter category-it currently tests sensitivity to 112 allergens-may lead to a pitfall: detecting IgE to unexpected allergens, such as Hymenoptera venom. In fact, testing insect venom sensitivity in individuals with no history of reactions to stings is contrary to current guidelines and presents the physician with the dilemma of how to manage this information; moreover, this may become a legal issue. Based on what is currently known about venom allergy, it remains likely that a positive sensitization test result will have no clinical significance, but the possibility of reacting to a future sting cannot be completely ruled out. Because this problem has not been previously encountered using the more common allergy tests, no indications are currently available on how to effectively manage these cases.

A pitfall to avoid when using an allergen microarray: the incidental detection of IgE to unexpected allergens.  
Incorvaia C, Mauro M, Ridolo E, Makri E, Montagni M, Ciprandi G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Nov 18;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome to mushrooms challenging currently used diagnostic criteria.
A non-atopic healthy 9-year-old girl presented for evaluation of 2 episodes of profuse vomiting more than 2 hours after ingestion of a meal containing unknown species of mushrooms that occurred when she was 7 years old. Typical IgE-mediated symptoms, such as urticaria, sneezing, or wheezing, were absent. The patient presented to our allergy clinic 2 years after the initial reaction for evaluation. Although FPIES to mushrooms was suspected based on the clinical symptoms, we performed a prick-to-prick test to “common white” mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) to exclude an associated IgE-mediated sensitization. The skin test was negative. To confirm the diagnosis of FPIES, an OFC was performed. Three hours after ingestion of an age-appropriate portion (22.5 g) of cooked “common white” mushrooms (A. bisporus), our patient experienced 2 episodes of vomiting with mild lethargy.

A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome to mushrooms challenging currently used diagnostic criteria.  
Serafini S, Bergmann MM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Eigenmann PA, Caubet JC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):135-137

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The development of IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity after the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis to the same food.
A report of a case of a patient who developed IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity to cow’s milk after the identification of cow’s milk as the causative agent for the patient’s eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). At 14 months of age, a boy presented to our practice due to feeding difficulties, vomiting, and reflux symptoms. At nearly 5 years of age, after 2.5 years of continued avoidance

of dairy, the patient had an accidental ingestion of one-third of a cup of whole milk, which resulted in symptoms of oropharyngeal edema. Repeated esophagogastroduodenoscopy and esophageal biopsy again revealed the absence of esophageal eosinophils. Subsequent skin prick testing was positive to milk.

The development of IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity after the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis to the same food.  
Hill DA, Shuker M, Cianferoni A, Wong T, Ruchelli E, Spergel JM, Brown-Whitehorn TF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):123-124

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fixed food eruption caused by peanut and cashew
A 22-year-old patient with a fixed food eruption caused by peanut and cashew: for the past 2 years, immediately after eating peanuts and cashews, the patient developed a red, raised pruritic wheal and flare on his right inner thigh and left volar forearm at the site of an angiolipoma biopsy scar. Skin prick testing was nonreactive to almond, brazil nut, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, black walnut, and peanut. Patch testing to peanut butter and crushed peanuts was negative. Total IgE measured 16.7 kU/L. In vitro testing yielded negative results. Open oral challenge to peanut butter resulted in an approximately 10-mm nonpigmented wheal with surrounding erythema over his left forearm scar approximately 10 minutes after ingestion. Immunoblot analysis of the patient’s serum against raw peanut, cashew, and almond samples revealed IgE binding at 15, 17, and 20 kDa for peanut, with weaker binding for peanut, at 8, 9, 25, 30, 37, and 42 kDa. The patient also had weak IgE binding at 42 kDa for almond. No IgE binding was detected for cashew. Six months after initial presentation and biopsy, the patient still eats peanuts and cashews, and his skin reactions continue on his right thigh and left forearm, now over his new scar.

Fixed food eruption caused by peanut and cashew: A case report and review of the literature.  
Parker AL, Pinson ML, Wohltmann WE, Gomez R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):119-122

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Increasing rate of hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in Italian children.
This study reports that food-induced anaphylaxis (FIA)-related hospital admissions in Italian children increased year on year from 2001 to 2011. This finding suggests that the trend is also increasing in the European pediatric population as well as in the United States and Australia. A total of 3121 FIA-related hospital admissions of 2552 subjects (mean age, 15.5 years) were identified with the ICD-9-CM codes during the 6-year study period. Hospital admissions for FIA occurred mainly in the North of Italy (2253, 72.2%). During the same period, there were 2252 FIA-related admissions (72.1%) of 1785 patients 14 years or younger (mean age, 5.18 years).

Increasing rate of hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in Italian children: An analysis of the Italian Ministry of Health database.  
Nocerino R, Leone L, Cosenza L, Berni CR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
How much is too much?: Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens.
Precautionary labeling is used to warn consumers of the presence of unintended allergens, but the lack of agreed allergen thresholds can result in confusion and risk taking by patients with food allergy. The lack of data on threshold doses below which subjects are unlikely to react is preventing the development of evidence-based allergen management strategies that are understood by clinician and patient alike. This study sought to define threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in the European population. Patients with food allergy were drawn from the EuroPrevall birth cohort, community surveys, and outpatient clinic studies and invited to undergo a food challenge. Low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were undertaken with commercially available food ingredients (peanut, hazelnut, celery, fish, and shrimp) blinded into common matrices. Dose distributions were modeled by using interval-censoring survival analysis with 3 parametric approaches. Of the 5 foods used for challenge, 4 produced similar dose distributions, with estimated doses eliciting reactions in 10% of the allergic population (ED10), ranging from 1.6 to 10.1 mg of protein for hazelnut, peanut, and celery with overlapping 95% CIs. ED10 values for fish were somewhat higher (27.3 mg of protein), although the CIs were wide and overlapping between fish and plant foods. Shrimp provided radically different dose distributions, with an ED10 value of 2.5 g of protein. This evidence base will contribute to the development of reference doses and action levels for allergens in foods below which only the most sensitive subjects might react.

How much is too much?: Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Beyer K, Defernez M, Sperrin M, Mackie AR, Salt LJ, Hourihane JO, Asero R, Belohlavkova S, Kowalski M, de BF, Papadopoulos NG, Clausen M, Knulst AC, Robe.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Dec 18;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Distinct parameters of the basophil activation test reflect the severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut.
Basophil reactivity is associated with severity and basophil sensitivity is associated with the threshold of allergic reactions to peanut. CD63 peanut/anti-IgE and CD-sens values can be used to estimate the severity and threshold of allergic reactions during OFCs

Distinct parameters of the basophil activation test reflect the severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut.  
Santos AF, Du TG, Douiri A, Radulovic S, Stephens A, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):179-186

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Environmental lead exposure and increased risk for total and allergen-specific IgE in US adults.
The authors of this study conclude that "we provide the first evidence that higher blood lead levels increased the risk of having IgE to specific allergens, namely dust mites and arthropods, among adults."

Environmental lead exposure and increased risk for total and allergen-specific IgE in US adults.  
Min KB, Min JY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):275-277

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Casein-related anaphylaxis after use of an Everlast kickboxing glove.
A 20-year-old woman with a lifelong severe allergy to cow’s milk products involving episodes of anaphylaxis who experienced a near-fatal anaphylactic reaction within 15 minutes after donning and exercising with a pair of new Everlast kickboxing gloves. The material data safety sheet from the manufacturer indicated rubber components in the glove but no milk products. Latex-specific IgE measurements were weakly positive. However, a second blood specimen collected 3 weeks later produced negative results. A high level of anti-cow’s milk IgE was consistent with the patient’s previous IgE anti-milk serology. Thus suspicion as to the offending allergen in the glove switched from natural rubber latex to cow’s milk. The padding extracts were analyzed. Bands observed at 24 to 28 kDa indicated the presence of casein in the glove extract.

Casein-related anaphylaxis after use of an Everlast kickboxing glove.  
Hamilton RG, Scheer DI, Gruchalla R, Adkinson NF, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):269-271

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.
"Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals."

Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.  
Nilsson OB, van Hage M, Grönlund H.
Methods 2014 Mar 1;66(1):86-95.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylactic shock to anti-tuberculosis drugs.
Anaphylactic shock during the course of treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs is rare and becomes a major problem delaying recovery from tuberculosis. Streptomycin and rifampicin are the drugs most often involved. Anaphylactic shock is a preoccupying situation when the drug in question is a first-line drug, in which case oral desensitization can be a therapeutic alternative allowing re-introduction of the responsible drug.

Choc anaphylactique aux antituberculeux : quel bilan et quelle prise en charge ? / Anaphylactic shock to anti-tuberculosis drugs: what results and what support?  
H. Daghfous, H. Zaibi, F. Tritar
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):580-585

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to house dust mites: from diagnosis to management
"The role of house dust mites in the generation of various allergic symptoms, in particular, those of rhinitis and asthma, is now well known. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which house dust mites can induce sensitization and allergies are still the theme of numerous studies. While the literature is extremely abundant, with 34,371 articles indexed on the theme of house dust mite allergy in Pub Med since 1871, with more than 1000 articles published annually in recent years, a critical, comprehensive analysis of the publications dealing with the diagnosis and management of allergy to house dust mites would appear to us to be useful, in light of the historical, epidemiologic, taxonomic, allergenic (molecular allergenic diagnostic tools) and therapeutic data available. The rational management of respiratory allergy to house dust mites, of which the two principal causes in France are Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae which co-exist in our homes, depends on consensus-based recommendations and evidence-based medical data."

Allergie aux acariens domestiques : du diagnostic à la prise en charge / Allergy to house dust mites: from diagnosis to management  
G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):544-553

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of cross-sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and components
We carried out a respective study on 1314 sIgE tests for venoms and their components done in 10 laboratories in France. The results showed that the test for P. dominulus (i77) is more sensitive than the test for Polistes spp. Only 10% of the patients sensitized to two wasps were found to recognize identical allergens. Some patients who had higher sIgE to Ves v5 compared to Vespula spp. frequently had even higher sIgE to Pol d5, and vice versa. Nearly 25% of the sIgE tests in Northern France were positive for Polistes spp., but cross-reactivity to Vespula is likely in these cases. Sensitization to Ves v1 or Api m1 was highly correlated to whole honey bee venom sensitization in both cases. Double sensitizations to wasp and bee venom were poorly correlated. In the rare cases where sensitization to carbohydrates exceeded that to a venom, an even higher sensitivity to a different venom was observed.

Évaluation des sensibilisations croisées aux venins d’hyménoptères et composants / Evaluation of cross-sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and components  
C. Lambert, J. Vitte, A. Sarrat, C. Dzviga, le Groupe de travail des insectes piqueurs, Réseau des biologistes de l’allergie des centres hospitaliers « AllergoBioNet »
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):575-579

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Anaphylactic shock to raspberry.  
Ciprandi G, Tosca MA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 May;46(3):123-124

Reply to: Update on Systemic Nickel Allergy Syndrome and Diet.  
Pizzutelli S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;47(1):27-32

Update on systemic nickel allergy syndrome and diet.  
Goldenberg A, Jacob SE.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;47(1):25-26

Severe biphasic anaphylaxis to bigarreau cherry in a child.  
Tosca MA, Olcese R, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;47(1):22-24

Grass pollen triggered anaphylaxis in an adolescent boy.  
Haluk AH, Akif GM, Tahan F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;47(1):20-21
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.  
Imbesi S, Allegra A, Calapai G, Musolino C, Gangemi S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jan;43(1):88-91
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The prevalence of Hymenoptera venom allergy in adults: The results of a very crowded city in Euroasia.  
Gelincik A, Issever H, Unal D, Isik E, Demirturk M, Gul H, Iliaz R, Kara E, Ertek B, Ozseker F, Colakoglu B, Buyukozturk S.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):35-40
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Sensitization of specific IgE-positive Japanese who have experienced Hymenoptera stings to recombinant versions of the Ves v 1 and Ves v 5 allergens in hornet venom.  
Hirata H, Yoshida N, Watanabe M, Sugiyama K, Arima M, Ishii Y.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):115-117

Hypersensitivity reactions and drug fever by bendamustine: A case report of three patients.  
Barbarroja-Escudero J, Sanchez-Gonzalez MJ, ntolin-Amerigo D, Rodriguez-Rodriguez M, varez-Mon M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):109-111

Fixed drug urticaria: A report of two patients.  
Barbarroja-Escudero J, Sanchez-Gonzalez MJ, Rodriguez-Rodriguez M, ntolin-Amerigo D, Velez D, Medina-Exposito I, Sanchez-Gomez-Aparici E, Piteiro AB, varez-Mon M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):101-103

Fecal eosinophil-derived neurotoxin in cow's milk-sensitive enteropathy: A case report.  
Wada T, Matsuda Y, Muraoka M, Toma T, Yachie A.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):99-100

IgE Abs to Der p 1 and Der p 2 as diagnostic markers of house dust mite allergy as defined by a bronchoprovocation test.  
Minami T, Fukutomi Y, Lidholm J, Yasueda H, Saito A, Sekiya K, Tsuburai T, Maeda Y, Mori A, Taniguchi M, Hasegawa M, Akiyama K.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):90-95
Click to view abstract

Food allergy preceded by contact urticaria due to the same food: Involvement of epicutaneous sensitization in food allergy.  
Inomata N, Nagashima M, Hakuta A, Aihara M.
Allergol Int 2015 Jan;64(1):73-78
Click to view abstract

In vivo diagnosis of allergic diseases - allergen provocation tests.  
Agache I, Bilo M, Braunstahl GJ, Delgado L, Demoly P, Eigenmann P, Gevaert P, Gomes E, Hellings P, Horak F, Muraro A, Werfel T, Marek J.
Allergy 2015 Jan 30;
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The EuroPrevall outpatient clinic study on food allergy: background and methodology.  
Fernandez-Rivas M, Barreales L, Mackie AR, Fritsche P, Vazquez-Cortes S, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Clausen M, Gislason D, Sinaniotis A, Kompoti E, Le TM, Knulst AC, Purohit A, .
Allergy 2015 Jan 30;
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Gas, dust and fume exposure is associated with mite sensitisation and with asthma in mite-sensitised adults.  
Bjerg A, Ronmark E, Hagstad S, Eriksson J, Andersson M, Wennergren G, Toren K, Ekerljung L.
Allergy 2015 Jan 30;
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Comparable profiles of serum histamine and IgG4 levels in allergic beekeepers.  
Chliva C, Aggelides X, Makris M, Katoulis A, Rigopoulos D, Tiligada E.
Allergy 2015 Jan 5;
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Predictors of health-related quality-of-life of European food-allergic patients.  
Saleh-Langenberg J, Goossens N, Flokstra BB, Kollen BJ, van der MG, Le T, Knulst A, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski M, Rokicka E, Starosta P, de la Hoz CB, Vazquez-Cortes S, Cerecedo I, .
Allergy 2015 Jan 28;
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IgE recognition patterns in peanut allergy are age dependent: perspectives of the EuroPrevall study.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Lidholm J, Fernandez-Rivas M, Seneviratne S, Hanschmann KM, Vogel L, Bures P, Fritsche P, Summers C, Knulst AC, Le TM, Reig I, Papadopoulos NG, Sinaniotis A, Belohlavkova .
Allergy 2015 Jan 24;
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Loss-of-function variants of the filaggrin gene are associated with clinical reactivity to foods.  
van Ginkel CD, Flokstra-de Blok BM, Kollen BJ, Kukler J, Koppelman GH, Dubois AE.
Allergy 2015 Jan 5;
Click to view abstract

Peanut anaphylaxis: the usefulness of molecular-based allergy diagnostics.  
Ciprandi G, Pistorio A, Silvestri M, Rossi GA, Tosca MA.
Allergy 2015 Jan;70(1):129-130

Epidemiology of childhood peanut allergy.  
Dyer AA, Rivkina V, Perumal D, Smeltzer BM, Smith BM, Gupta RS.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jan;36(1):58-64
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Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.  
Saff RR, Banerji A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jan;36(1):34-39
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A review of the evidence linking eosinophilic esophagitis and food allergy.  
Lin SK, Sabharwal G, Ghaffari G.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jan;36(1):26-33
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A case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish (Raphanus sativus l).  
Lee YH, Lee JH, Kang HR, Ha JH, Lee BH, Kim SH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):95-97
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Delayed anaphylaxis to red meat associated with specific IgE antibodies to galactose.  
Wen L, Zhou J, Yin J, Sun JL, Sun Y, Wu K, Katial R.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):92-94
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Cross-reactivity between the soybean protein p34 and bovine caseins.  
Candreva AM, Smaldini PL, Curciarello R, Cauerhff A, Fossati CA, Docena GH, Petruccelli S.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):60-68
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Work-Related Asthma in Korea - Findings from the Korea Work-Related Asthma Surveillance (KOWAS) program, 2004-2009.  
Kwon SC, Song J, Kim YK, Calvert GM.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):51-59
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Significance of 40-, 45-, and 48-kDa proteins in the moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms of buckwheat allergy.  
Cho J, Lee JO, Choi J, Park MR, Shon DH, Kim J, Ahn K, Han Y.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jan;7(1):37-43
Click to view abstract

Asian sand dust aggregate causes atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in Nc/Nga mice.  
Takeshita S, Tokunaga T, Tanabe Y, Arinami T, Ichinose T, Noguchi E.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):3
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Allergy to sunflower seed and sunflower butter as proposed vehicle for sensitization.  
Lavine E, Ben-Shoshan M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):2
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State of the Art: Medical treatment of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).  
Ta V, Simon R.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2015 Jan;29(1):41-43
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Factors driving the aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease phenotype.  
Steinke JW, Borish L.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2015 Jan;29(1):35-40
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IgE-binding properties of a recombinant lipid transfer protein from Cannabis sativa.  
Rihs HP, Armentia A, Sander I, Bruning T, Raulf M, Varga R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jun 19;

In vivo tests with 'Tahini' sauce: new allergenic source to evaluate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to sesame.  
la-Torre E, Pignatti P, Yacoub MR, Sabbadini MG, Colombo G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Mar;110(3):209-210

Goji berry: a potential new player in latex-food syndrome.  
Gamez C, Marchan E, Miguel L, Sanz V, Del P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Mar;110(3):206-207

Mixing compatibilities of Aspergillus and American cockroach allergens with other high-protease fungal and insect extracts.  
Grier TJ, Hall DM, Duncan EA, Coyne TC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan 8;
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Effectiveness of a computer module to augment the training of school staff in the management of students with food allergies.  
White L, Aubin J, Bradford C, Alix C, Hughes L, Phipatanakul W.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan 7;

Risk of allergic reaction and sensitization to antibiotics in foods.  
Graham F, Paradis L, Begin P, Paradis J, Babin Y, Des RA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Sep;113(3):329-330

Intractable shellfish anaphylaxis: sensitization by cross-reactive substances in a complementary 'immune stimulant' and acrylic nails.  
Rolland JM, Varese N, Zubrinich CM, O'Hehir RE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Mar;110(3):211-212

Positive house dust mite skin test in a nonatopic patient with scabies.  
Bajoghli AA, Bajoghli M, Adler S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Dec;113(6):667

Allergy after ingestion of bee-gathered pollen: influence of botanical origins.  
Shahali Y.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan 15;

Association between allergic sensitization and exhaled nitric oxide in children in the School Inner-City Asthma Study.  
Rao DR, Sordillo JE, Kopel LS, Gaffin JM, Sheehan WJ, Hoffman E, Ozonoff A, Gold DR, Phipatanakul W.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan 14;

Allergen of the month-stemphylium.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan;114(1):A11

Information and support from dietary consultation for mothers of children with food allergies.  
MacKenzie H, Grundy J, Glasbey G, Dean T, Venter C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jan;114(1):23-29
Click to view abstract

Two cases of allergies due to anisakis simplex, positive to specific ige for Ani s 12 allergen. [Japanese]  
Kinoshita Y, Fujimoto K, Lee M, Shinohara R, Kobayashi Y, Kawana S, Saeki H.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1348-1352
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of the allergenicity of beta-casein in Japanese children with cow milk allergy by using the basophil activation test. [Japanese]  
Ito Y, Shimomura M, Tokunaga F, Meguro T, Seto S, Hashiguchi A, Kimura M.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1330-1337
Click to view abstract

Approach of environmental medicine to chemical sensitivity and its skin manifestation. [Japanese]  
Fukuzumi T.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1304-1310

Influence of environment on adult allergic diseases -exacerbation factors of asthma-. [Japanese]  
Nakamura Y.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1298-1303

Progress in the study concerning adverse effects of particulate matters on allergy. [Japanese]  
Tanaka M, Inoue K, Takano H.
Arerugi 2014 Dec;63(10):1289-1297

Infant gut microbiota and food sensitization: associations in the first year of life.  
Azad MB, Konya T, Guttman DS, Field CJ, Sears MR, HayGlass KT, Mandhane PJ, Turvey SE, Subbarao P, Becker AB, Scott JA, Kozyrskyj AL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jan 20;
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Does air pollution really cause allergy?  
Peden DB.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jan;45(1):3-5

Pet ownership is associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma and reduced risk of atopy in childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort.  
Collin SM, Granell R, Westgarth C, Murray J, Paul E, Sterne JA, John HA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jan;45(1):200-210
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Carbohydrates as allergens.  
Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jan;15(1):492
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Farm animal models of organic dust exposure and toxicity: insights and implications for respiratory health.  
McClendon CJ, Gerald CL, Waterman JT.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 29;
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Occupational diseases in individuals exposed to metal working fluids.  
Rosenman K.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 6;
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IgeE-mediated allergic reactions after the first administration of glatiramer acetate in patients with multiple sclerosis.  
Corominas M, Postigo I, Cardona V, Lleonart R, Romero-Pinel L, Martinez J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):244-246
Click to view abstract

An immunodiagnostic assay for quantitation of specific IgE to the major pollen allergen component, Pas n 1, of the subtropical bahia grass.  
Timbrell VL, Riebelt L, Simmonds C, Solley G, Smith WB, lean-Tooke A, van NS, Smith PK, Upham JW, Langguth D, Davies JM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(4):219-228
Click to view abstract

Epinephrine use in positive oral food challenges performed as screening test for food allergy therapy trials.  
Noone S, Ross J, Sampson HA, Wang J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 13;
Click to view abstract

Improving the Effectiveness of Penicillin Allergy De-labeling.  
Bourke J, Pavlos R, James I, Phillips E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 13;
Click to view abstract

Adjusting for nonresponse bias corrects overestimates of food allergy prevalence.  
Soller L, Ben-Shoshan M, Harrington DW, Knoll M, Fragapane J, Joseph L, St PY, La VS, Wilson K, Elliott SJ, Clarke AE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 14;

Is It Food Allergy or Frey Syndrome?  
Buyuktiryaki B, Sekerel BE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 15;

Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.  
Mori F, Cianferoni A, Barni S, Pucci N, Rossi ME, Novembre E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 16;
Click to view abstract

Conjunctival provocation tests: a predictive factor for patients' seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms.  
Kruse K, Gerwin E, Eichel A, Shah-Hosseini K, Mosges R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan 22;
Click to view abstract

A pitfall to avoid when using an allergen microarray: the incidental detection of IgE to unexpected allergens.  
Incorvaia C, Mauro M, Ridolo E, Makri E, Montagni M, Ciprandi G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Nov 18;
Click to view abstract

An infant with atopic dermatitis and itching after ingestion of milk.  
Lieberman P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):146-147

Influenza vaccine and egg allergy: nearing the end of an evidence-based journey.  
Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):140-141

Safe vaccination of patients with egg allergy by using live attenuated influenza vaccine.  
Des RA, Samaan K, Graham F, Lacombe-Barrios J, Paradis J, Paradis L, De SG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):138-139

A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome to mushrooms challenging currently used diagnostic criteria.  
Serafini S, Bergmann MM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Eigenmann PA, Caubet JC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):135-137

Food allergies affect growth in children.  
Hobbs CB, Skinner AC, Burks AW, Vickery BP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):133-134

The predictive relationship between peanut- and Ara h 2-specific serum IgE concentrations and peanut allergy.  
Ebisawa M, Moverare R, Sato S, Borres MP, Ito K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):131-132

Long-term increase in epinephrine availability associated with school nurse training in food allergy.  
Chokshi NY, Patel D, Davis CM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):128-130

Adherence to extensively heated egg and cow's milk after successful oral food challenge.  
Lee E, Mehr S, Turner PJ, Joshi P, Campbell DE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):125-127

The development of IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity after the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis to the same food.  
Hill DA, Shuker M, Cianferoni A, Wong T, Ruchelli E, Spergel JM, Brown-Whitehorn TF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):123-124

Fixed food eruption caused by peanut and cashew: A case report and review of the literature.  
Parker AL, Pinson ML, Wohltmann WE, Gomez R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):119-122

Profile of a milk-allergic patient who tolerated partially hydrolyzed whey formula.  
Lee TD, Gimenez G, Grishina G, Mishoe M, Sampson HA, Bunyavanich S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):116-118

Prevalence and characteristics of adult-onset food allergy.  
Kamdar TA, Peterson S, Lau CH, Saltoun CA, Gupta RS, Bryce PJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):114-115

Patent blue anaphylaxis: case report.  
Viegas LP, Lopes A, Campos-Melo A, Ferreira MB, Barbosa MP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):112-113

Life-threatening intraoperative anaphylaxis to gelatin in Floseal during pediatric spinal surgery.  
Agarwal NS, Spalding C, Nassef M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):110-111

Intraoperative and procedure-related anaphylaxis.  
Greenberger PA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):106-107

Antibiotics are an important identifiable cause of perioperative anaphylaxis in the United States.  
Gonzalez-Estrada A, Pien LC, Zell K, Wang XF, Lang DM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):101-105
Click to view abstract

Comprehensive allergy evaluation is useful in the subsequent care of patients with drug hypersensitivity reactions during anesthesia.  
Guyer AC, Saff RR, Conroy M, Blumenthal KG, Camargo CA, Long AA, Banerji A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):94-100
Click to view abstract

Household costs associated with objectively diagnosed allergy to staple foods in children and adolescents.  
Protudjer JL, Jansson SA, Heibert AM, Bengtsson U, Kallstrom-Bengtsson I, Marklund B, Middelveld R, Rentzos G, Sundqvist AC, Akerstrom J, Ostblom E, Dahlen SE, Ahlstedt S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):68-75
Click to view abstract

Nannies' knowledge, attitude, and management of food allergies of children: an online survey.  
Greiwe JC, Pazheri F, Schroer B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):63-67
Click to view abstract

Oral food challenge and food allergy quality of life in caregivers of children with food allergy.  
Franxman TJ, Howe L, Teich E, Greenhawt MJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):50-56
Click to view abstract

Prevalence and predictors of food allergy in Canada: a focus on vulnerable populations.  
Soller L, Ben-Shoshan M, Harrington DW, Knoll M, Fragapane J, Joseph L, St PY, La VS, Wilson K, Elliott SJ, Clarke AE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):42-49
Click to view abstract

The changing field of food allergy.  
Burks AW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):39-41

Food allergy and eosinophilic esophagitis: what do we do?  
Chehade M, Aceves SS, Furuta GT, Fleischer DM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):25-32
Click to view abstract

Baked milk- and egg-containing diet in the management of milk and egg allergy.  
Leonard SA, Caubet JC, Kim JS, Groetch M, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):13-23
Click to view abstract

Clinical management of food allergy.  
Bird JA, Lack G, Perry TT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jan;3(1):1-11
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Increasing rate of hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in Italian children: An analysis of the Italian Ministry of Health database.  
Nocerino R, Leone L, Cosenza L, Berni CR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 25;

Clonal mast cell disorders in patients with severe Hymenoptera venom allergy and normal serum tryptase levels.  
Zanotti R, Lombardo C, Passalacqua G, Caimmi C, Bonifacio M, De MG, Perbellini O, Rossini M, Schena D, Busa M, Marcotulli MC, Bilo MB, Franchini M, Marchi G, Simioni L, Bonadonna P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 17;
Click to view abstract

Occupational asthma is a cause of adult-onset asthma with poor prognosis.  
Burge PS, Moore VC, Robertson AS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 15;

Diagnostic and experimental food challenges in patients with nonimmediate reactions to food.  
Tripathi A, Commins SP, Heymann PW, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 12;

How much is too much?: Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Beyer K, Defernez M, Sperrin M, Mackie AR, Salt LJ, Hourihane JO, Asero R, Belohlavkova S, Kowalski M, de BF, Papadopoulos NG, Clausen M, Knulst AC, Robe.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Dec 18;
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnosis of baker's allergy based on specific IgE to recombinant wheat flour proteins.  
Sander I, Rihs HP, Doekes G, Quirce S, Krop E, Rozynek P, van K, Merget R, Meurer U, Bruning T, Raulf M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan 7;
Click to view abstract

Distinct parameters of the basophil activation test reflect the severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut.  
Santos AF, Du TG, Douiri A, Radulovic S, Stephens A, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):179-186
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Consumption of unprocessed cow's milk protects infants from common respiratory infections.  
Loss G, Depner M, Ulfman LH, van Neerven RJ, Hose AJ, Genuneit J, Karvonen AM, Hyvarinen A, Kaulek V, Roduit C, Weber J, Lauener R, Pfefferle PI, Pekkanen J, Vaarala O, Dalphin JC, Riedler J, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):56-62
Click to view abstract

Environmental lead exposure and increased risk for total and allergen-specific IgE in US adults.  
Min KB, Min JY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):275-277

Casein-related anaphylaxis after use of an Everlast kickboxing glove.  
Hamilton RG, Scheer DI, Gruchalla R, Adkinson NF, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jan;135(1):269-271

Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.  
Nilsson OB, van Hage M, Grönlund H.
Methods 2014 Mar 1;66(1):86-95.
Abstract

Recently introduced foods as new allergenic sources: sensitisation to Goji berries (Lycium barbarum).  
Carnés J, de Larramendi CH, Ferrer A, Huertas AJ, López-Matas MA, Pagán JA, Navarro LA, García-Abujeta JL, Vicario S, Peña M.
Miscellaneous 592 2013 Apr 15;137(1-4):130-5.
Abstract

Impact of elimination diets on growth and nutritional status in children with multiple food allergies.  
Berry MJ, Adams J, Voutilainen H, Feustel PJ, Celestin J, Jarvinen KM.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 31;
Click to view abstract

Molecular characterization of allergens in raw and processed kiwifruit.  
Uberti F, Penas E, Manzoni Y, di LC, Ballabio C, Fiocchi A, Terracciano L, Restani P.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 30;
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Health Related Quality of Life in children with perceived and diagnosed food hypersensitivity.  
Venter C, Sommer I, Moonesinghe H, Grundy J, Glasbey G, Dean T.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 23;
Click to view abstract

Wheat allergy in children evaluated with challenge and IgE antibodies to wheat components.  
Nilsson N, Sjolander S, Baar A, Berthold M, Pahr S, Vrtala S, Valenta R, Morita E, Hedlin G, Borres MP, Nilsson C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 19;
Click to view abstract

Factors associated with good adherence to self-care behaviours amongst adolescents with food allergy.  
Jones CJ, Llewellyn CD, Frew AJ, Du Toit G, Mukhopadhyay S, Smith H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 14;
Click to view abstract

Choc anaphylactique aux antituberculeux : quel bilan et quelle prise en charge ? / Anaphylactic shock to anti-tuberculosis drugs: what results and what support?  
H. Daghfous, H. Zaibi, F. Tritar
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):580-585
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Editorial: Outils diagnostiques de l’allergie aux venins d’hyménoptères / Diagnostics of allergy to Hymenoptera venom  
F. Lavaud, G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):535-536
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Association of HLA-G 14 bp insertion/deletion and TGF-ß1 polymorphisms with atopic asthma monosensitized against Der p 1: An Algerian study with a review of the literature  
R. Djidjik, M. Gharnaout, N. Messaoudani, W. Boukouaci, A. Benyounes, M. Ghaffor, M.C. Abbadi, D. Charron, R. Tamouza
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):537-543
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie aux acariens domestiques : du diagnostic à la prise en charge / Allergy to house dust mites: from diagnosis to management  
G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):544-553
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La trousse d’urgence : pour qui ? / The emergency kit: for whom?  
C. Mouton-Faivre
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):554-556
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Pollinose au chêne, au platane, au plantain, à l’armoise. Mythe ou réalité ? / Pollinosis oak, the sycamore, plantain, mugwort. Myth or reality?  
G. Pauli, N. Hutt, O. Stchetchicova
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):557-565
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Évaluation des sensibilisations croisées aux venins d’hyménoptères et composants / Evaluation of cross-sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and components  
C. Lambert, J. Vitte, A. Sarrat, C. Dzviga, le Groupe de travail des insectes piqueurs, Réseau des biologistes de l’allergie des centres hospitaliers « AllergoBioNet »
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(8):575-579
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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