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 Allergy Advisor Digest - May 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read A case of hypersensitivity to progesterone presenting as an eczematous eruption.
Read Unusual allergy to soy appeared in adult age.
Read Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?
Read Mosquito salivary allergen Aed a 3: cloning, comprehensive molecular analysis, and clinical evaluation.
Read Occupational exposure to bioaerosols in Norwegian crab processing plants.
Read Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India
Read Kiwifruit cysteine protease actinidin compromises the intestinal barrier by disrupting tight junctions.
Read Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.
Read Increase in pollen sensitization in Swedish adults and protective effect of keeping animals in childhood.
Read Increases in anaphylaxis fatalities in Australia 1997 to 2013.
Read Peanut allergy: New developments and clinical implications.
Read Lipid Transfer Protein Syndrome in a Non-Mediterranean Area.
Read Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega5-Gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Study on the immunoreactivity of Triticum monococcum (Einkorn) wheat in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis for the production of hypoallergenic foods.
Read Severe toxic skin reaction caused by a common anemone and identification of the culprit organism.
Read Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.
Read Mirabel: an integrated project for risk and cost/benefit analysis of peanut allergy.
Read Prevalence of sensitization to allergens in school children with asthma residents from Guadalajara metropolitan area.
Read Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.

Abstracts shared in May 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Global perceptions of food allergy thresholds in 16 countries.
Read Paprika rhinoconjunctivitis case reveals new occupational Capsicum allergens.
Read A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein.
Read Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols (PEGs): a review.
Read Pearls and pitfalls in diagnosing IgE-Mediated food allergy.
Read Non-celiac disease non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity.
Read The Gluten-Free Diet: Recognizing Fact, Fiction, and Fad.
Read Immunogenic potential of wheat beer (Weissbier).
Read Effect of avoidance on peanut allergy after early peanut consumption.
Read Allergenicity characteristics of germinated soybean proteins

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of hypersensitivity to progesterone presenting as an eczematous eruption.
Hypersensitivity to progesterone is a rare condition, and it represents a hypersensitivity reaction to endogenous progesterone. A case of a woman who presented to our attention for evaluation of a rash for a few years on her posterior elbows, forearms, and right lateral lower extremity. The authors report this case because it describes a rare clinical entity, with an atypical clinical presentation pemphigoid-like, that is rarely described in literature

A case of hypersensitivity to progesterone presenting as an eczematous eruption.  
Tammaro A, Tuchinda P, Pigliacelli F, Halvorson C, Kao G, Persechino S, Gaspari AA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):97-98

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Unusual allergy to soy appeared in adult age.
A 69 year-old man presented with symptoms of anaphylaxis. About 20 years before, he experienced an episode of generalized urticaria / angioedema and collapse about 10’ after eating a commercial cracker with soybean. About 1 month before the visit, he experienced severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea and generalized urticaria about 15 minutes after eating a risotto with many vegetables. Skin tests with a large panel of commercial food extracts demonstrated an intense reaction to soy only. Specific IgE to whole soybean extract was 1.07 kU/L. No IgE reactivity to rBet v 1 (homologous to Gly m 4), rGly m 5, and rGly m 6 was found in ISAC microarray. Immunoblot analysis was negative, probably due to the limited concentration of specific IgE in serum. The authors conclude that the allergen component involved was not detectable using commercial diagnostic methods, and not identified, possibly due to the insufficient level of specific IgE.

Unusual allergy to soy appeared in adult age.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S, Villalta D.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):94-96

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?
Anaphylaxis has been defined as a 'severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction'. However, data indicate that the vast majority of food-triggered anaphylactic reactions are not life-threatening. Nonetheless, severe life-threatening reactions do occur, and are unpredictable. We discuss the concepts surrounding perceptions of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions to food by different stakeholders, with particular reference to the inclusion of clinical severity as a factor in allergy and allergen risk management. We review the evidence regarding factors which might be used to identify those at most risk of severe allergic reactions to food, and the consequences of misinformation in this regard. For example, a significant proportion of food-allergic children also have asthma, yet almost none will experience a fatal food-allergic reaction; asthma is not, in itself, a strong predictor for fatal anaphylaxis. The relationship between dose of allergen exposure and symptom severity is unclear. While dose appears to be a risk factor in at least a subgroup of patients, studies report that individuals with prior anaphylaxis do not have a lower eliciting dose than those reporting previous mild reactions. It is therefore important to consider severity and sensitivity as separate factors, as a highly sensitive individual will not necessarily experience severe symptoms during an allergic reaction. We identify the knowledge gaps which need to be addressed to improve our ability to better identify those most at risk of severe food-induced allergic reactions.

Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?  
Turner PJ, Baumert JL, Beyer K, Boyle R, Chan CH, Clark A, Crevel RW, DunnGalvin A, Fernandez RM, Gowland HM, Grabenhenrich L, Hardy S, Houben GF, Hourihane JO, Muraro A, Poulsen LK, Pyrz .
Allergy 2016 May 3;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mosquito salivary allergen Aed a 3: cloning, comprehensive molecular analysis, and clinical evaluation.
Aed a 3 that corresponds to the Aegyptin protein is a major mosquito salivary allergen was expressed as a recombinant protein. Its recombinant form has biological activity and is suitable for use in skin tests and specific IgE assays in mosquito-allergic individuals

Mosquito salivary allergen Aed a 3: cloning, comprehensive molecular analysis, and clinical evaluation.  
Peng Z, Xu WW, Sham Y, Lam H, Sun D, Cheng L, Rasic NF, Guan Q, James AA, Simons FE.
Allergy 2016 May;71(5):621-628

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational exposure to bioaerosols in Norwegian crab processing plants.
Aerosolization of components when processing king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) and edible crab (Cancer pagurus) may cause occupational health problems when inhaled by workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out in three king crab plants and one edible crab plant. Total protein and tropomyosin levels were highest in the edible crab plant, endotoxin levels were highest in king crab plants. King crab exposure levels were highest during raw processing. Tropomyosin levels were highest during raw king crab processing with geometric mean (GM) 9.6 versus 2.5ng m-3 during cooked processing. Conversely, edible crab tropomyosin levels were highest during cooked processing with GM 45.4 versus 8.7ng m-3 during raw processing. Endotoxin levels were higher in king crab plants than in the edible crab plant with GM = 6285.5 endotoxin units (EU) m-3 versus 72 EU m-3. In the edible crab plant, NAGase levels were highest during raw processing with GM = 853 pmol4-methylumbelliferone (MU) m-3 versus 422 pmol4-MU m-3 during cooked processing. Trypsin activity was found in both king crab and edible crab plants and levels were higher in raw than cooked processing. Differences in exposure levels between plants and worker groups (raw and cooked processing) were identified.

Occupational exposure to bioaerosols in Norwegian crab processing plants.  
Thomassen MR, Kamath SD, Lopata AL, Madsen AM, Eduard W, Bang BE, Aasmoe L.
Ann Occup Hyg 2016 May 28. pii: mew030. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India
Sericulture plays an eminent role in development of rural economy in India. Silk filature is a unit where silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins. During the process workers are exposed to the high molecular weight proteins like Sericin and Fibroin which are potent allergens leading to sensitization over a period of time and subsequently occupational related health disorders. This study identified and compare the magnitude of silk allergen sensitization in workers of silk filatures. One hundred twenty subjects working in the silk filatures formed the study group. Mean age was 34.14 +/- 2.84 years in the study group. Sensitization to silk allergen was 35.83% in the study group and 20.83% in the control group A and 11.11% in control group B.

Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study.  
Gowda G, Shivalingaiah AH, Vijayeendra AM, Sarkar N, Nagaraj C, Masthi NR.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Apr;6(2):90-93

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Kiwifruit cysteine protease actinidin compromises the intestinal barrier by disrupting tight junctions.
Act d 1 caused protease-dependent disruption of tight junctions in confluent Caco-2 cells and increased intestinal permeability in mice. In line with the observed effects of food cysteine proteases in occupational allergy, these results suggest that disruption of tight junctions by food cysteine proteases may contribute to the process of sensitization in food allergy.

Kiwifruit cysteine protease actinidin compromises the intestinal barrier by disrupting tight junctions.  
Grozdanovic MM, Cavic M, Nesic A, Andjelkovic U, Akbari P, Smit JJ, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M.
Biochim Biophys Acta 2016 Mar;1860(3):516-526

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.
Due to the high prevalence of allergic diseases globally there are increasing demands in clinical practice for managing these IgE-mediated conditions. Traditionally, diagnosis relied on clinical history and sensitization that was demonstrated through an allergy test based on allergen extracts. During the last decade component-resolved diagnostics has been introduced into the field of clinical allergology, providing information that cannot be obtained from extract-based tests. Component-resolved data facilitate more precise diagnosis of allergic diseases and identify sensitizations attributable to cross-reactivity. Furthermore it assists risk assessment in clinical practice as sensitization to some allergenic molecules is related to persistence of clinical symptoms and systemic rather than local reactions. The information may also aid the clinician in prescription of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in patients with complex symptoms and sensitization patterns, and in giving advice on targeted exposure reduction or on the need to perform food challenges.

Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.  
Patelis A, Borres MP, Kober A, Berthold M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Increase in pollen sensitization in Swedish adults and protective effect of keeping animals in childhood.
Pollen sensitization has increased in Swedish adults since the early 1990's, while the prevalence of sensitization to other allergens has remained unchanged. This is one plausible explanation for the increase in rhinitis 1990-2008 in Swedish adults, during which time the prevalence of asthma, which is more associated with perennial allergens, was stable. Contact with animals in childhood seems to reduce the risk of sensitization well into adulthood. One major factor contributing to the rise in pollen allergy is a significant increase in levels of birch and grass pollen over the past three decades.

Increase in pollen sensitization in Swedish adults and protective effect of keeping animals in childhood.  
Bjerg A, Ekerljung L, Eriksson J, Naslund J, Sjolander S, Ronmark E, Dahl A, Holmberg K, Wennergren G, Toren K, Borres MP, Lotvall J, Lundback B.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Increases in anaphylaxis fatalities in Australia 1997 to 2013.
The aim of the study was to determine whether Australian anaphylaxis fatalities are increasing in parallel and to examine the characteristics of fatalities recorded in the National Coronial Information System (NCIS). Time trends in Australian anaphylaxis fatalities were examined using data derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 1997-2013 and the NCIS 2000-2013, the latter providing additional information to verify cause and identify risk factors. The ABS recorded 324 anaphylaxis fatalities by cause: unspecified (n=205); medication (n=52); insect stings/tick bites (n=41); food (n=23); blood products (n=3). From 1997-2013, all-cause fatal anaphylaxis rates increased by 6.2%/year (95% CI: 3.8 to 8.6%, p<0.0001) or from 0.054 to 0.099/105 population). Fatal food anaphylaxis increased by 9.7%/year (95% CI: 0.25 to 20%, p=0.04) and unspecified anaphylaxis deaths by 7.8% (95%CI: 4.6 to 11.0, p<0.0001). There was an insignificant change in medication-related fatalities, (5.6% increase/year; 95% CI: 0.3% decrease to 11.8% increase, p=0.06) and sting/bite fatalities remained unchanged. Hospital anaphylaxis admission rates for all-cause, food, unspecified and medication anaphylaxis increased at rates of 8%, 10%, 4.4% and 6.8%/year, respectively. 147 verified NCIS deaths were examined in detail: Medication and sting/bite-related fatalities occurred predominantly in older individuals with multiple co-morbidities. Upright posture after anaphylaxis was associated with risk of sudden death (all causes). Seafood (not nuts) was the most common trigger for food-related anaphylaxis deaths. Australian anaphylaxis fatality rates (most causes) have increased over the last 16 years, contrasting with UK and USA-based studies that describe overall lower and static overall anaphylaxis fatality rates (0.047-0.069/105 population).

Increases in anaphylaxis fatalities in Australia 1997 to 2013.  
Mullins RJ, Wainstein BK, Barnes EH, Liew WK, Campbell DE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 3;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut allergy: New developments and clinical implications.
Food allergies have increased in prevalence over the past 20 years, now becoming an important public health concern. Although there are no therapies currently available for routine clinical care, recent reports have indicated that immunotherapies targeting the mucosal immune system may be effective. Oral immunotherapy is conducted by administering small, increasing amounts of food allergen; it has shown promise for desensitizing individuals with peanut, egg, or milk allergies. Sublingual immunotherapy also desensitizes allergic patients to foods-two major studies have examined the effects of sublingual immunotherapy in subjects with peanut allergies. We review the complex nature of IgE-mediated food allergies and the therapies being evaluated in clinical trials. We focus on the diagnosis and management of food allergies and investigational therapies

Peanut allergy: New developments and clinical implications.  
Commins SP, Kim EH, Orgel K, Kulis M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 May;16(5):35

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lipid Transfer Protein Syndrome in a Non-Mediterranean Area.
Plant food allergies associated with lipid transfer protein (LTP) have been widely described in the Mediterranean Basin. The aim of this Spanish study was to describe the clinical profile and pollen sensitization of plant food- allergic patients sensitized to LTP in a non-Mediterranean area. Patients with clear IgE-mediated symptoms associated with plant foods and a positive skin prick test (SPT) to Pru p 3 were included in a prospective study in the north of Spain. Among the 72 patients included, the most frequent food allergy reported was to peaches (69%) followed by nuts (walnuts 55%, peanuts 54% and hazelnuts 43%). Most patients suffered from symptoms with multiple plant foods (a median of 6 foods per patient). Regarding the patients' pollen sensitization, 36% were sensitized to mugwort pollen (72% showing sIgE to Art v 3), 33% to grass pollen and 24% to plane tree pollen (94% with sIgE to Pla a 3). Inhibition studies showed that specific IgEs against mugwort and plane tree pollen are inhibited by Pru p 3 in a strong manner, whereas Pru p 3 was less inhibited by pollen extracts.

Lipid Transfer Protein Syndrome in a Non-Mediterranean Area.  
Azofra J, Berroa F, Gastaminza G, Saiz N, Gamboa PM, Vela C, Garcia BE, Lizarza S, Echenagusia MA, Joral A, Aranzabal MA, Quinones MD, Jauregui I, Madera JF, Navarro JA, Lizaso MT, Bernad .
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(3):181-188

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega5-Gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which omega5-gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interference. Sera from 7 of 11 WDEIA patients showed greatly reduced levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to omega5-gliadins in both transgenic lines. However, these sera also showed low levels of reactivity to other gluten proteins. Sera from three patients showed the greatest reactivity to proteins other than omega5-gliadins, either high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), alpha-gliadins, or non-gluten proteins. The complexity of immunological responses among these patients suggests that flour from the transgenic lines would not be suitable for individuals already diagnosed with WDEIA. However, the introduction of wheat lacking omega5-gliadins could reduce the number of people sensitized to these proteins and thereby decrease the overall incidence of this serious food allergy

Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega5-Gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Altenbach SB, Tanaka CK, Pineau F, Lupi R, Drouet M, Beaudouin E, Morisset M, ery-Papini S.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Oct 28;63(42):9323-9332

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Study on the immunoreactivity of Triticum monococcum (Einkorn) wheat in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis for the production of hypoallergenic foods.
Our aim was to study the immunoreactivity of proteins in Triticum monococcum (einkorn, T.m.), a diploid ancestral wheat lacking B chromosomes, for possible use in the production of hypoallergenic foods. A total of 14 patients with a clear history of WDEIA and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to omega-5 gliadin were enrolled. Skin prick test (SPT) with a commercial wheat extract and an in-house T.a. gluten diagnostic solution tested positive for 43 and 100% of the cases, respectively. No reactivity in patients tested with solutions prepared from four T.m. accessions was observed. The immunoblotting of T.m. gluten proteins performed with the sera of patients showed different IgE-binding profiles with respect to T.a., confirming the absence of omega-5 gliadin. A general lower immunoreactivity of T.m. gluten proteins with scarce cross-reactivity to omega-5 gliadin epitopes was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the absence of reactivity by SPT and the limited cross-reactivity with omega-5 gliadin, T.m. might represent a potential candidate in the production of hypoallergenic bakery products for patients sensitized to omega-5 gliadin. Further analyses need to be carried out regarding its safety

Study on the immunoreactivity of Triticum monococcum (Einkorn) wheat in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis for the production of hypoallergenic foods.  
Lombardo C, Bolla M, Chignola R, Senna G, Rossin G, Caruso B, Tomelleri C, Cecconi D, Brandolini A, Zoccatelli G.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Sep 23;63(37):8299-8306

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe toxic skin reaction caused by a common anemone and identification of the culprit organism.
In this case report, we present our method to identify snakelocks anemone (Anemonia viridis or formerly Anemonia sulcata) as the culprit of a severe toxic skin reaction. A. viridis is one of the most common anemones of the Mediterranean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean. It lives at a depth of up to 10 m. It is a member of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, hydroids, and corals. They have toxic organelles called cnidocysts that have the capacity to inject venom with microscopic harpoon-like structures. The cnidocysts of A. viridis may cause toxic and allergic reactions, and although its venom is one of the most studied cnidarian venoms, detailed case reports are rare

Severe toxic skin reaction caused by a common anemone and identification of the culprit organism.  
Tezcan OD, Gozer O.
J Travel Med 2015 Jul;22(4):269-271

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.
Most insect-allergy related cases have been reported for species from Solenopsis, Myrmecia and Pachycondyla genera, and their stings can often result in human fatalities. In addition, stinging ants can have serious health effects on livestock, agricultural damage adversely affecting the biodiversity of the region. This review discusses the impact of important ant species on human health in the Asia-Pacific region along with the molecular immunological aspects of the identified venoms and current status of diagnostics and therapeutics.

Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.  
Srisong H, Daduang S, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2016 Jan;6924-32

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mirabel: an integrated project for risk and cost/benefit analysis of peanut allergy.
Food allergy is a major public health issue. However, no regulatory measures exist when allergens are present at trace levels and the different risk components are poorly described. Thus, knowledge on exposure components such as the allergens present in foods and the consumption behaviour of allergic consumers and models to estimate the related risk need to be enriched. Mirabel proposes for the first time studying each risk component using an integrated approach in order to improve the quality of life of the allergic population. Field surveys were conducted in order to fill in the current gaps in unintentional allergen traces in food, allergic consumers' food behaviour, threshold doses of allergic reaction, allergy symptoms and severity. The aim is also to propose methodological and operational tools to quantify allergic risk, to test management scenarios and to produce a cost/benefit analysis. Medical data on the peanut allergies of 785 patients were collected in the MIRABEL survey and 443 patients answered the food consumption questionnaire. The population surveyed was mostly paediatric - 86% were children under 16 years of age, with a high percentage of males (60%). This project will generate tangible results on peanut allergen exposure and risk which could be used in future risk assessment work and particularly to provide science-based guidance to set up concentration limits for peanut traces on packages

Mirabel: an integrated project for risk and cost/benefit analysis of peanut allergy.  
Crepet A, Papadopoulos A, Elegbede CF, it-Dahmane S, Loynet C, Millet G, Van DB, Bruyere O, Marette S, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Mar;71(2):178-183

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of sensitization to allergens in school children with asthma residents from Guadalajara metropolitan area.
This study determined the prevalence of the sensitization to allergens in children with asthma in Guadalajara metropolitan area. This study included 186 children, the median age was 7 years olds, the male group was 104/186 (55.9%) The median of the positive results was 5 and monosensitized were 47/186 (2.2%). The most common category of allergens was the indoor (90.3%), then trees (71.0%), and finally the fungi (9.7%). Individually, the house dust mites were more common in between the interior allergens, followed by the epithelial; in the tree pollen were oaks (31.7%) and ashes (28.0%), in weeds was mugwort (21.5%), in grasses was Zea mays (18.3%) and in the fungi was Cladosporium spp. (6.5%).

Prevalence of sensitization to allergens in school children with asthma residents from Guadalajara metropolitan area. [Spanish]  
Alcalá-Padilla G, Bedolla-Barajas M, Kestler-Gramajo A, Valdez-López F.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Apr;63(2):135-142

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.
Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking

Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.  
Mbiya W, Chipinda I, Simoyi RH, Siegel PD.
Toxicology 2016 Jan 2;33934-39

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Basophil activation test: handle with care.  
Maietta G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):110-111

Is basophil activation test (BAT) really useful for allergy diagnosis?  
Chirumbolo S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):107-109

Severe anaphylaxis to Propofol: first case of evidence of sensitization to soy oil.  
Richard C, Beaudouin E, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Kohler C, Nguyen-Grosjean VM, Jacquenet S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):103-106
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Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis complicating Swyer-James-Macleod's syndrome: case report and review of literature.  
Sehgal IS, Dhooria S, Behera D, Agarwal R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):99-102
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A case of hypersensitivity to progesterone presenting as an eczematous eruption.  
Tammaro A, Tuchinda P, Pigliacelli F, Halvorson C, Kao G, Persechino S, Gaspari AA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):97-98
Click to view abstract

Unusual allergy to soy appeared in adult age.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S, Villalta D.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 May;48(3):94-96
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of Gramineae bee-collected pollen is proportional to its mass but is highly variable and depends on the members of the Gramineae family.  
Nonotte-Varly C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 May;44(3):232-240

Anaphylaxis case report to trimethylphloroglucinol (Spasfon).  
Nahas O, Nkashama-Tshiaba L, Demoly P, Chiriac AM.
Allergol Int 2016 May 14;

IgE-binding epitopes of various fish parvalbumins exist in a stereoscopic conformation maintained by Ca binding.  
Kobayashi A, Ichimura A, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K.
Allergol Int 2016 May 12;

Global perceptions of food allergy thresholds in 16 countries.  
Marchisotto MJ, Harada L, Blumenstock J, Bilaver L, Waserman S, Sicherer S, Boloh Y, Regent L, Said M, Schnadt S, Allen K, Muraro A, Taylor S, Gupta RS.
Allergy 2016 May 13;
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Drug allergy passport and other documentation for patients with drug hypersensitivity - An ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group Position Paper.  
Brockow K, Aberer W, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Bavbek S, Bircher A, Bilo B, Blanca M, Bonadonna P, Burbach G, Calogiuri G, Caruso C, Celik G, Cernadas J, Chiriac A, Demoly P, Oude Elberink J.
Allergy 2016 May 4;
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Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?  
Turner PJ, Baumert JL, Beyer K, Boyle R, Chan CH, Clark A, Crevel RW, DunnGalvin A, Fernandez RM, Gowland HM, Grabenhenrich L, Hardy S, Houben GF, Hourihane JO, Muraro A, Poulsen LK, Pyrz .
Allergy 2016 May 3;
Click to view abstract

Mosquito salivary allergen Aed a 3: cloning, comprehensive molecular analysis, and clinical evaluation.  
Peng Z, Xu WW, Sham Y, Lam H, Sun D, Cheng L, Rasic NF, Guan Q, James AA, Simons FE.
Allergy 2016 May;71(5):621-628

Utility of laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy.  
Vachova M, Panzner P, Malkusova I, Hanzlikova J, Vlas T.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 May;37(3):248-255
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A Case of Pranlukast-Induced Anaphylactic Shock.  
Kim S, Lee JM.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 May;8(3):276-278
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Allergen-Dependent Differences in ILC2s Frequencies in Patients With Allergic Rhinitis.  
Fan D, Wang X, Wang M, Wang Y, Zhang L, Li Y, Fan E, Cao F, Van CK, Zhang L.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 May;8(3):216-222
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IgG Sensitization to Extracellular Vesicles in Indoor Dust Is Closely Associated With the Prevalence of Non-Eosinophilic Asthma, COPD, and Lung Cancer.  
Kim YS, Choi JP, Kim MH, Park HK, Yang S, Kim YS, Kim TB, Cho YS, Oh YM, Jee YK, Lee SD, Kim YK.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 May;8(3):198-205
Click to view abstract

Paprika rhinoconjunctivitis case reveals new occupational Capsicum allergens.  
Airaksinen L, Riekki R, Vuokko A, Puustinen A.
Am J Ind Med 2015 Jul;58(7):791-794
Click to view abstract

The influence of sensitization on mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticide-induced airway hyperreactivity.  
Proskocil BJ, Bruun DA, Garg JA, Villagomez CC, Jacoby DB, Lein PJ, Fryer AD.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2015 Nov;53(5):738-747
Click to view abstract

Occupational exposure to bioaerosols in Norwegian crab processing plants.  
Thomassen MR, Kamath SD, Lopata AL, Madsen AM, Eduard W, Bang BE, Aasmoe L.
Ann Occup Hyg 2016 May 28. pii: mew030. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Penicillin skin testing in hospitalized patients with beta-lactam allergies: Effect on antibiotic selection and cost.  
King EA, Challa S, Curtin P, Bielory L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May 19;
Click to view abstract

Parental timing of allergenic food introduction in urban and suburban populations.  
Hartman H, Dodd C, Rao M, DeBlasio D, Labowsky C, D'Souza S, Lenkauskas S, Roeser E, Heffernan A, Assa'ad A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May 13;
Click to view abstract

Occupational rhinitis and asthma due to ranitidine.  
Santana AH, Bermejo SB, Ruiz-Hornillos J, Monge MV, Nieto MF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May 7;

Aseptic loosening of a total knee prosthesis caused by delayed hypersensitivity to bone cement.  
Vega F, Bazire R, Belver MT, Mugica MV, Urquia A, Blanco C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May 5;

A case of vibratory anaphylaxis.  
Alpern ML, Campbell RL, Rank MA, Park MA, Hagan JB.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May 3;

Basophil activation test, skin prick test, and anaphylaxis after drug hypersensitivity.  
Chirumbolo S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May;116(5):478

Leaving home: Helping teens with allergic conditions become independent.  
Stukus DR, Nassef M, Rubin M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May;116(5):388-391

Does the amount of egg protein and type of preparation influence tolerability of baked egg products and potential development of regular egg tolerance in egg-allergic children?  
Leonard SA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May;116(5):381-382

First case of type IV hypersensitivity to periocular topotecan.  
Graham F, Superstein R, Carret AS, Paradis L, Hamel P, Des RA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 May;116(5):469-470

Dogs and asthma.  

Arch Dis Child 2016 Jan;101(1):8

Flu vaccine and egg allergy.  

Arch Dis Child 2015 Dec;100(12):1162

A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein.  
Murad A, Katelaris CH, Baumgart K.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Apr;6(2):129-132

Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study.  
Gowda G, Shivalingaiah AH, Vijayeendra AM, Sarkar N, Nagaraj C, Masthi NR.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Apr;6(2):90-93
Click to view abstract

T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.  
Yun J, Cai F, Lee FJ, Pichler WJ.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Apr;6(2):77-89
Click to view abstract

Kiwifruit cysteine protease actinidin compromises the intestinal barrier by disrupting tight junctions.  
Grozdanovic MM, Cavic M, Nesic A, Andjelkovic U, Akbari P, Smit JJ, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M.
Biochim Biophys Acta 2016 Mar;1860(3):516-526
Click to view abstract

Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.  
Patelis A, Borres MP, Kober A, Berthold M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 19;
Click to view abstract

Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols (PEGs): a review.  
Wenande E, Garvey LH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 19;
Click to view abstract

Increase in pollen sensitization in Swedish adults and protective effect of keeping animals in childhood.  
Bjerg A, Ekerljung L, Eriksson J, Naslund J, Sjolander S, Ronmark E, Dahl A, Holmberg K, Wennergren G, Toren K, Borres MP, Lotvall J, Lundback B.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 9;
Click to view abstract

Increases in anaphylaxis fatalities in Australia 1997 to 2013.  
Mullins RJ, Wainstein BK, Barnes EH, Liew WK, Campbell DE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 3;
Click to view abstract

Follicular helper T cells are responsible for IgE responses to Der p 1 following house dust mite sensitization in mice.  
Noble A, Zhao J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May 3;
Click to view abstract

Molecular allergology between precision medicine and the Choosing Wisely initiative.  
Matricardi PM, Kleine-Tebbe J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 May;46(5):664-667

Cow's milk allergy in Dutch children: an epigenetic pilot survey.  
Petrus NC, Henneman P, Venema A, Mul A, van SF, Haagmans M, Mook O, Hennekam RC, Sprikkelman AB, Mannens M.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;616
Click to view abstract

Food allergy: our evolving understanding of its pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment.  
Iweala OI, Burks AW.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 May;16(5):37
Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy: New developments and clinical implications.  
Commins SP, Kim EH, Orgel K, Kulis M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 May;16(5):35
Click to view abstract

Pearls and pitfalls in diagnosing IgE-Mediated food allergy.  
Stukus DR, Mikhail I.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 May;16(5):34
Click to view abstract

Non-celiac disease non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity. [German]  
Zopf Y, Dieterich W.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2015 Nov;140(22):1683-1687
Click to view abstract

A retrospective analysis of allergic reaction severities and minimal eliciting doses for peanut, milk, egg, and soy oral food challenges.  
Zhu J, Pouillot R, Kwegyir-Afful EK, Luccioli S, Gendel SM.
Food Chem Toxicol 2015 Jun;8092-100
Click to view abstract

Allergenic response to squid (Todarodes pacificus) tropomyosin Tod p1 structure modifications induced by high hydrostatic pressure.  
Jin Y, Deng Y, Qian B, Zhang Y, Liu Z, Zhao Y.
Food Chem Toxicol 2015 Feb;7686-93
Click to view abstract

Enzymatic hydrolysis: a method in alleviating legume allergenicity.  
Kasera R, Singh AB, Lavasa S, Prasad KN, Arora N.
Food Chem Toxicol 2015 Feb;7654-60
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact eczema to a long-used cosmetic: Methylisothiazolinon, a type IV-allergen. [German]  
Gabelein-Wissing N, Lehmann P, Hofmann SC.
Hautarzt 2015 Jun;66(6):462-464
Click to view abstract

Lipid Transfer Protein Syndrome in a Non-Mediterranean Area.  
Azofra J, Berroa F, Gastaminza G, Saiz N, Gamboa PM, Vela C, Garcia BE, Lizarza S, Echenagusia MA, Joral A, Aranzabal MA, Quinones MD, Jauregui I, Madera JF, Navarro JA, Lizaso MT, Bernad .
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;169(3):181-188
Click to view abstract

Serum diamine oxidase activity in patients with histamine intolerance.  
Manzotti G, Breda D, Di GM, Burastero SE.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 2016 Mar;29(1):105-111
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to parthenolide.  
Nanda A, Wasan A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May 5;

Skin tests and in vitro tests for insect allergy.  
Ledford DK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May;4(3):562-563

Is It time for a randomized trial on early introduction of milk?  
Greenhawt M, Fleischer DM, Spergel JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May;4(3):489-490

The Association of the Delayed Introduction of Cow's Milk with IgE-Mediated Cow's Milk Allergies.  
Onizawa Y, Noguchi E, Okada M, Sumazaki R, Hayashi D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May;4(3):481-488
Click to view abstract

Fungal Sensitivity: New Insights and Clinical Approaches.  
Bush RK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May;4(3):433-434

Home assessment and remediation.  
Barnes CS, Horner WE, Kennedy K, Grimes C, Miller JD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 May;4(3):423-431
Click to view abstract

The Gluten-Free Diet: Recognizing Fact, Fiction, and Fad.  
Reilly NR
J Pediatr 2016 May 10.
Abstract

Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega5-Gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Altenbach SB, Tanaka CK, Pineau F, Lupi R, Drouet M, Beaudouin E, Morisset M, ery-Papini S.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Oct 28;63(42):9323-9332
Click to view abstract

Study on the immunoreactivity of Triticum monococcum (Einkorn) wheat in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis for the production of hypoallergenic foods.  
Lombardo C, Bolla M, Chignola R, Senna G, Rossin G, Caruso B, Tomelleri C, Cecconi D, Brandolini A, Zoccatelli G.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Sep 23;63(37):8299-8306
Click to view abstract

Structural basis of IgE binding to alpha- and gamma-Gliadins: contribution of disulfide bonds and repetitive and nonrepetitive domains.  
Mameri H, Brossard C, Gaudin JC, Gohon Y, Paty E, Beaudouin E, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Drouet M, Sole V, Wien F, Lupi R, Larre C, Snegaroff J, ery-Papini S.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Jul 29;63(29):6546-6554
Click to view abstract

Purification, characterization, and analysis of the allergenic properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkii.  
Zhang YX, Chen HL, Maleki SJ, Cao MJ, Zhang LJ, Su WJ, Liu GM.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Jul 15;63(27):6271-6282
Click to view abstract

Proteomics, peptidomics, and immunogenic potential of wheat beer (Weissbier).  
Picariello G, Mamone G, Cutignano A, Fontana A, Zurlo L, Addeo F, Ferranti P.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Apr 8;63(13):3579-3586
Click to view abstract

Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.  
Fontenot AP, Falta MT, Kappler JW, Dai S, McKee AS.
J Immunol 2016 Jan 1;196(1):22-27
Click to view abstract

Factors impacting parental burden in food-allergic children.  
Allen CW, Bidarkar MS, vanNunen SA, Campbell DE.
J Paediatr Child Health 2015 Jul;51(7):696-698
Click to view abstract

Severe toxic skin reaction caused by a common anemone and identification of the culprit organism.  
Tezcan OD, Gozer O.
J Travel Med 2015 Jul;22(4):269-271
Click to view abstract

A medical-toxicological view of tattooing.  
Laux P, Tralau T, Tentschert J, Blume A, Al DS, Baumler W, Bernstein E, Bocca B, Alimonti A, Colebrook H, de CC, Dahne L, Hauri U, Howard PC, Janssen P, Katz L, Klitzman B, Kluger N, Krutak .
Lancet 2016 Jan 23;387(10016):395-402
Click to view abstract

Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.  
Srisong H, Daduang S, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2016 Jan;6924-32
Click to view abstract

Randomized Trial of Introduction of Allergenic Foods in Breast-Fed Infants.  
Perkin MR, Logan K, Tseng A, Raji B, Ayis S, Peacock J, Brough H, Marrs T, Radulovic S, Craven J, Flohr C, Lack G.
N Engl J Med 2016 May 5;374(18):1733-1743
Click to view abstract

Effect of avoidance on peanut allergy after early peanut consumption.  
Du Toit G, Sayre PH, Roberts G, Sever ML, Lawson K, Bahnson HT, Brough HA, Santos AF, Harris KM, Radulovic S, Basting M, Turcanu V, Plaut M, Lack G.
N Engl J Med 2016 Apr 14;374(15):1435-1443
Click to view abstract

Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease--New Prime Suspects.  
Laidlaw TM, Boyce JA.
N Engl J Med 2016 Feb 4;374(5):484-488

Failure of introduction of cashew nut after a negative oral food challenge test in children.  
van der Valk JP, Gerth van Wijk R, Dubois AE, de Groot H, de Jong NW.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 May 4;
Click to view abstract

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is associated with pet ownership in Cystic Fibrosis.  
Thronicke A, Heger N, Antweiler E, Krannich A, Roehmel J, Brandt C, Staab D, Tintelnot K, Schwarz C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 May 4;
Click to view abstract

Phenotypical characterization of children with hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs.  
Cousin M, Chiriac A, Molinari N, Demoly P, Caimmi D.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 May 12;
Click to view abstract

IgE Immunoadsorption Knocks Down the Risk of Food-Related Anaphylaxis.  
Dahdah L, Ceccarelli S, Amendola S, Campagnano P, Cancrini C, Mazzina O, Fiocchi A.
Pediatrics 2015 Dec;136(6):e1617-e1620
Click to view abstract

Food Allergy in Infants With Atopic Dermatitis: Limitations of Food-Specific IgE Measurements.  
Spergel JM, Boguniewicz M, Schneider L, Hanifin JM, Paller AS, Eichenfield LF.
Pediatrics 2015 Dec;136(6):e1530-e1538
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity characteristics of germinated soybean proteins in a BALB/c mouse model.  
Yang H, Gao J, Yang A, Lu J, Chen H.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Jul;72(2):249-255
Click to view abstract

Extension of the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach to incorporate chemicals classified as reactive.  
Safford RJ, Api AM, Roberts DW, Lalko JF.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Aug;72(3):694-701
Click to view abstract

Mirabel: an integrated project for risk and cost/benefit analysis of peanut allergy.  
Crepet A, Papadopoulos A, Elegbede CF, it-Dahmane S, Loynet C, Millet G, Van DB, Bruyere O, Marette S, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Mar;71(2):178-183
Click to view abstract

Assessment of the skin sensitising potency of the lower alkyl methacrylate esters.  
Kimber I, Pemberton MA.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2014 Oct;70(1):24-36
Click to view abstract

Measurement of endogenous allergens in genetically modified soybeans--short communication.  
Ladics GS, Budziszewski GJ, Herman RA, Herouet-Guicheney C, Joshi S, Lipscomb EA, McClain S, Ward JM.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2014 Oct;70(1):75-79
Click to view abstract

Latex sensitization prevalence through prick test in patients with genitourinary malformations and more than 3 surgeries. [Spanish]  
ias-Robles AP, Moran-Mendoza AR.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Apr;63(2):154-162
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of sensitization to allergens in school children with asthma residents from Guadalajara metropolitan area. [Spanish]  
Alcalá-Padilla G, Bedolla-Barajas M, Kestler-Gramajo A, Valdez-López F.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Apr;63(2):135-142
Click to view abstract

Clinical profile of sensitization to fungi in Medellin, Colombia. [Spanish]  
Bissinger I, Bareno J.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Apr;63(2):123-134
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of sensitization to fungi in patients with respiratory allergy. [Spanish]  
Gonzalez-Diaz SN, rias-Cruz A, Ibarra-Chavez JA, Elizondo-Villarreal B, Rivero-Arias DM, Salinas-Diaz MR.
Rev Alerg Mex 2016 Apr;63(2):143-153
Click to view abstract

Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.  
Mbiya W, Chipinda I, Simoyi RH, Siegel PD.
Toxicology 2016 Jan 2;33934-39
Click to view abstract

Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.  
Cochrane SA, Arts JH, Ehnes C, Hindle S, Hollnagel HM, Poole A, Suto H, Kimber I.
Toxicology 2015 Jul 3;333179-194
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of the antigenicity of hydrolyzed cow's milk protein formulas using the mouse basophil activation test.  
Iwamoto H, Matsubara T, Nakazato Y, Namba K, Takeda Y.
Toxicol Lett 2016 Feb 3;24253-59
Click to view abstract


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