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 Allergy Advisor Digest - January 2017
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Hymenoptera Venom Allergy. A closer collaboration is needed between allergists and emergency physicians.
Read Immediate adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in children: a single center experience.
Read Pla a 2 and Pla a 3 reactivities identify London Plane tree-allergic patients with respiratory symptoms or food allergy.
Read Conjunctival allergen provocation test : guidelines for daily practice.
Read The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored guidelines on preventing peanut allergy: A new paradigm in food allergy prevention.
Read High rate of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic southern Ontario population.
Read Local allergic rhinitis to pollens is underdiagnosed in young patients.
Read Fish allergy in patients with parvalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E depends on parvalbumin content rather than molecular differences in the protein among fish species.
Read Use of baked milk challenges and milk ladders in clinical practice: a worldwide survey of healthcare professionals.
Read Immunology of Bee Venom.
Read Increasing Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis, 2005-2014.
Read Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test.

Abstracts shared in January 2017 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Anaphylaxis to hidden potato allergens in a peach and egg allergic boy.
Read Ara h 6 sensitization in peanut allergy: friend, foe or innocent bystander?
Read Parietaria pollination duration: myth or fact?
Read Clinical diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis in infancy.
Read Contact eczema of hands caused by contact with potato protein.
Read Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.
Read Three cases of anaphylaxis following injection of a depot corticosteroid with evidence of IgE sensitization to macrogols rather than the active steroid.
Read Threshold dose distribution in walnut allergy.
Read A single intervention for cockroach control reduces cockroach exposure and asthma morbidity in children.
Read Heterogeneity in allergy to mollusks: a clinical-immunological study in a population from the North of Spain.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hymenoptera Venom Allergy. A closer collaboration is needed between allergists and emergency physicians.
Hymenoptera stings are sometimes fatal in venom-allergic patients. Fatalities mostly occur in previously stung subjects, especially those with a history of systemic reactions, and could be avoided if patients were properly informed of the existence of a prevention strategy for insect stings, referred to an allergy follow-up and prescribed auto-injectable epinephrine and/or venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT). We sought to assess knowledge and awareness of Hymenoptera Venom Allergy (HVA) in a small sample of Emergency Physicians in our geographic area. Twenty-seven physicians completed the questionnaire. Twenty/27 (74%) were unaware of the classification of Hymenoptera sting reactions, 11/27 (41%) were unaware of the existence of prevention strategies such as VIT, 18/27 (67%) did not refer HVA patients to a specialist follow up. One/27 (4%) prescribed auto-injectable epinephrine and 100% wish better information on the topic.

Hymenoptera Venom Allergy. A closer collaboration is needed between allergists and emergency physicians.  
Ciccarelli A, Calabro C, Imperatore C, Scala G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):15-17

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in children: a single center experience.
Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is commonly used in primary and secondary immunodeficiency diseases as well as autoimmune conditions as immunomodulatator treatment. Immediate adverse events which are generally mild and occur during infusion are seen in 6 hours. Reported immediate adverse events are in a wide range from 1%-40% in pediatric patients. 115 patients who received IVIG (except newborns) were included into this crosssectional study. IVIG was given to patients for primary immunodeficiencies (n=8), ITP (n=65), Kawasaki disease (n=11), secondary immunosupression (n=28), and passive immunization (n=3). 5%, 10% IVIG preparations and pentaglobin were used. Headache, fever, chills, nausea, rash, arthralgia, myalgia and back pain were accepted as mild immediate events. There were 62 (54%) boys and 53 (46%) girls aged 1 month-18 years. Mean age of the group was 7.4+/-4.6 years. Immediate adverse events due to IVIG infusions were seen in 29 (25.2%) of all patients. Gender and types of the disease were not different in significance regarding the presence of adverse events. The rate of adverse events did not change with receiving pre-medication. The most common reaction was fever/chills. Immediate reactions were seen in first 6 hours in 7 patients and during infusion in the remaining. They were treated with slowing of the infusion rate and infusion was stopped in 3 patients because of moderate events. Because of the increasingly use of IVIG therapy, it is important to know the side effects. High doses, high infusion rates, accompanying infection may worsen the adverse effects especially in primary immunodeficiency diseases

Immediate adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in children: a single center experience.  
Kaba S, Keskindemirci G, Aydogmus C, Siraneci R, Erol CF.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):11-14

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pla a 2 and Pla a 3 reactivities identify London Plane tree-allergic patients with respiratory symptoms or food allergy.
Nine hundred and thirty-nine rPla a 1, nPla a 2, and rPla a 3 ImmunoCAP ISAC reactors were studied. nPla a 2pos MUXF3pos but Pla a 1/2neg subjects were excluded from the study because they were cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant reactors. Among the 764 remaining participants, 71.9% were Pla a 3pos , 54.1% Pla a 2pos , and 10.9% Pla a 1pos . Among Pla a 3 reactors, 89.6% were Pru p 3pos and 86.8% Jug 3pos , but the strongest IgE recognition relationship was observed between Pla a 3 and Jug r 3. Distinctive clinical subsets could be documented among plane tree-allergic patients. Pla a 3 reactors had both local and systemic food-induced reactions, but lower past respiratory symptoms occurrence. Pla a 2 reactivity was associated with respiratory symptoms but inversely related to systemic reactions to food. Cosensitization to Pla a 2 and Pla a 3 was associated with a lower past incidence of severe food-induced reactions

Pla a 2 and Pla a 3 reactivities identify plane tree-allergic patients with respiratory symptoms or food allergy.  
Scala E, Cecchi L, Abeni D, Guerra EC, Pirrotta L, Locanto M, Giani M, Asero R.
Allergy 2017 Jan 2;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Conjunctival allergen provocation test : guidelines for daily practice.
Conjunctival allergen provocation test (CAPT) reproduces the events occurring by instilling an allergen on the ocular surface. This paper is the compilation of a task force focussed on practical aspects of this technique based on the analysis of 131 papers. Main mechanisms involved are reviewed. Indications are diagnosing the allergen(s)-triggering symptoms in IgE-mediated ocular allergy in seasonal, acute or perennial forms of allergic conjunctivitis, especially when the relevance of the allergen is not obvious or in polysensitized patients. Contraindications are limited to ongoing systemic severe pathology, asthma and eye diseases. CAPT should be delayed if receiving systemic steroids or antihistamines. Local treatment should be interrupted according to the half-life of each drug. Prerequisites are as follows: obtaining informed consent; evidencing of an allergen by skin prick tests and/or serum-specific IgE dosages; being able to deal with an unlikely event such as acute asthma exacerbation, urticaria or anaphylaxis, or an exacerbation of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergen extracts should be diluted locally prior to administration. Positive criteria are based on itching or quoted according to a composite score. An alternative scoring is based on itching. CAPT remains underused in daily practice, although it is a safe and simple procedure which can provide valuable clinical information

Conjunctival allergen provocation test : guidelines for daily practice.  
Fauquert JL, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Rondon C, Calder V, Silva D, Kvenshagen BK, Callebaut I, Allegri P, Santos N, Doan S, Perez FD, Chiambaretta F, Delgado L, Leonardi A.
Allergy 2017 Jan;72(1):43-54

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored guidelines on preventing peanut allergy: A new paradigm in food allergy prevention.
Peanut allergy is a significant public health problem without proven treatment or cure at present. In 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that solid-food introduction be delayed in infants at high risk, including peanut introduction, until age 3 years. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics revised these recommendations based on limited evidence of benefit and, instead, recommended solid-food introduction not be delayed past 4-6 months of life. In 2015, the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy study showed that early peanut introduction (between 4 and 11 months of life) was associated with a significant absolute and relative risk reduction in the development of peanut allergy compared with delayed introduction. Based on these findings, the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored an expert panel to create an addendum to the 2010 Food Allergy Guidelines that specifically focuses on peanut allergy prevention. The addendum recommends that children with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both have peanut introduced as early as 4-6 months of life, after assessment by a trained allergy specialist. For children with mild-to-moderate eczema, peanut can be introduced at 6 months, without the need for specialist evaluation. For children with no eczema, peanut can be introduced in accordance with family and cultural preferences, without the need for specialist evaluation. Adherence to these clinical practice recommendations can help potentially reduce the number of cases of peanut allergy per year. However, this can only be accomplished with the cooperation of parents and health care providers who adhere to these recommendations.

The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored guidelines on preventing peanut allergy: A new paradigm in food allergy prevention.  
Greenhawt M.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2017 Jan 24;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
High rate of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic southern Ontario population.
Shrimp and house dust mite (HDM) allergies are common in Canadians. Often, both of these allergies occur in the same patient. This may be due to homology of tropomyosin or other potentially shared proteins. The aim of our study was to assess the frequency of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic Canadian population. We identified 95 shrimp allergic patients who were tested for house dust mite. 86 (90.5%) of these patients had a positive skin test to HDM. Patients with a shrimp skin test >/=5 mm were 5.31 times (95% CI, 1.55-18.14; p = 0.008) more likely to exhibit a dust mite skin test >/=5 mm than patients with a shrimp skin test <5 mm. The odds of a patient with a shrimp skin test between 10 and 18 mm having a larger HDM skin test were 3.93 times (95% CI 1.03-14.98, p = 0.045) the odds for a patient with a shrimp skin test size between 3 and 4 mm. We did not find a correlation between shrimp skin test size and shrimp reaction symptom grade (p = 0.301). In our Canadian patients, we found a large majority of shrimp allergic patients to be sensitized to HDM. We found that patients with a large skin test to shrimp were more likely to have a large skin test to HDM compared to those patients with a small skin test to shrimp. We did not find a correlation between shrimp skin test size and shrimp reaction symptom severity.

High rate of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic southern Ontario population.  
Rosenfield L, Tsoulis MW, Milio K, Schnittke M, Kim H.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;135

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Local allergic rhinitis to pollens is underdiagnosed in young patients.
The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) in young patients with a previous diagnosis of nonallergic rhinitis or suspicion of allergy. A total of 121 patients, ages 12-18 years old, with confirmed nonallergic rhinitis and typical seasonal nasal symptoms were examined. LAR to grass pollen (P. partense), Artemisia, and birch was confirmed in 17 (16.6%), 6 (5.9%), and 9 (8.9%) of patients, respectively. Polyvalent allergy was established in 21 subjects (20.8%): grass and Artemisia, 11 patients (10.9%); and grass and birch, 10 patients (9.9%). The remaining 48 patients (47.5%) were diagnosed with nonallergic rhinitis. The results of the nasal provocation tests and the concentrations of nasal IgE were similar among the analyzed groups. Therefor LAR is a serious problem in young patients; however, its significance is still unappreciated.

Local allergic rhinitis to pollens is underdiagnosed in young patients.  
Krajewska-Wojtys A, Jarzab J, Gawlik R, Bozek A.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Nov 1;30(6):198-201

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fish allergy in patients with parvalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E depends on parvalbumin content rather than molecular differences in the protein among fish species.
Allergenic characteristics of purified parvalbumins from different fish species have not been thoroughly investigated. We revealed that purified parvalbumins from nine different fish species have identical IgE-reactivities and high cross-reactivities. We also showed that fish allergenicity is associated with the parvalbumin content of the fish species, rather than species-specific differences in the molecular characteristics of the individual parvalbumin proteins

Fish allergy in patients with parvalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E depends on parvalbumin content rather than molecular differences in the protein among fish species.  
Kobayashi A, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2016 Oct;80(10):2018-2021

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Use of baked milk challenges and milk ladders in clinical practice: a worldwide survey of healthcare professionals.
In previous years, the cornerstone of the management of Cow's Milk Allergy (CMA) was solely based on the strict avoidance of all cow's milk (CM) and foods containing CM from the patient's diet. More recently, the importance of baked milk (BM) introduction into the diet of children with CMA has become well-recognised as a part of CMA management. Current research suggests that 75% of children become tolerant to baked/heated forms of CM such as muffin and waffles before they become tolerant to pure/uncooked forms of CM.

Use of baked milk challenges and milk ladders in clinical practice: a worldwide survey of healthcare professionals.  
Athanasopoulou P, Deligianni E, Dean T, Dewey A, Venter C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2017 Jan 21;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunology of Bee Venom.
Bee venom is a blend of biochemicals ranging from small peptides and enzymes to biogenic amines. It is capable of triggering severe immunologic reactions owing to its allergenic fraction. Venom components are presented to the T cells by antigen-presenting cells within the skin. These Th2 type T cells then release IL-4 and IL-13 which subsequently direct B cells to class switch to production of IgE. Generating venom-specific IgE and crosslinking FcepsilonR1(s) on the surface of mast cells complete the sensitizing stage in allergic individuals who are most likely to experience severe and even fatal allergic reactions after being stung. Specific IgE for bee venom is a double-edged sword as it is a powerful mediator in triggering allergic events but is also applied successfully in diagnosis of the venom allergic patient. The healing capacity of bee venom has been rediscovered under laboratory-controlled conditions using animal models and cell cultures. The potential role of enzymatic fraction of bee venom including phospholipase A2 in the initiation and development of immune responses also has been studied in numerous research settings. Undoubtedly, having insights into immunologic interactions between bee venom components and innate/specific immune cells both locally and systematically will contribute to the development of immunologic strategies in specific and epitope-based immunotherapy especially in individuals with Hymenoptera venom allergy

Immunology of Bee Venom.  
Elieh Ali KD, Shafaghat F, Zwiener RD.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2017 Jan 20;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Increasing Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis, 2005-2014.
Studies suggest that the incidence of anaphylaxis is increasing; however, recent trends in emergency department (ED) visits for anaphylaxis in the United States have not been studied. This study examined trends in the incidence and rates of anaphylaxis-related ED visits from 2005 through 2014. During the 10-year time period, 56,212 ED visits for anaphylaxis were identified. The median (interquartile range) age was 36 (17-52 years) years, and 58% were female. Most cases (57%) were due to unspecified triggers, 27% were associated with food, 12% were medication related, and 4% were due to insect venom. The overall rate of anaphylaxis per 100,000 enrollees increased by 101%, from 14.2 in 2005 to 28.6 in 2014 (P < .001). Rates of ED visits for anaphylaxis increased in all age groups, but the greatest increase was in children aged 5 to 17 years (196% increase; P < .001). The rate of food-related anaphylaxis increased by 124% (P < .001), and the rate of medication-related anaphylaxis increased by 212% (P < .001).

Increasing Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis, 2005-2014.  
Motosue MS, Bellolio MF, Van Houten HK, Shah ND, Campbell RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan;5(1):171-175

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test.
The underdiagnosed feather duvet lung, an extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by duck and goose feathers, can be more frequently diagnosed, if duck and goose feather antibodies are included in the panel of the routinely applied IgG antibody screening test. This does not necessarily require extending the screening test to include duck and goose feather antigens. By analysing 100 sera with duck and goose antibodies we found that the commonly used pigeon and budgerigar antibodies can also screen for feather duvet antibodies. All examined sera lacking pigeon and budgerigar antibodies also lacked clear-cut duck and goose feather antibodies. The examined sera with strong pigeon or budgerigar antibodies always also contained feather duvet antibodies. However, sera with medium or low concentrated pigeon or budgerigar antibodies are not always associated with feather duvet antibodies. In the light of these observations, we find that 71% of the duck and goose antibody analyses would be dispensable without essential loss of quality, if the results of screening for pigeon and budgerigar antibodies were incorporated into the procedure of a step-by- step diagnostics

Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test. [German]  
Sennekamp J, Lehmann E.
Pneumologie 2015 Nov;69(11):638-644

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Anaphylaxis to hidden potato allergens in a peach and egg allergic boy.  
Martin-Munoz MF, az-Perales A, Cannabal J, Quirce S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):45-48
Click to view abstract

A very unusual case of food allergy, between FPIES and IgE-mediated food allergy.  
Miceli SS, Monaco S, Cerchiara G, Bersani G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):42-44
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Ara h 6 sensitization in peanut allergy: friend, foe or innocent bystander?  
Tontini C, Marinangeli L, Maiello N, Abbadessa S, Villalta D, Antonicelli L.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):18-21
Click to view abstract

Hymenoptera Venom Allergy. A closer collaboration is needed between allergists and emergency physicians.  
Ciccarelli A, Calabro C, Imperatore C, Scala G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):15-17
Click to view abstract

Immediate adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in children: a single center experience.  
Kaba S, Keskindemirci G, Aydogmus C, Siraneci R, Erol CF.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):11-14
Click to view abstract

Parietaria pollination duration: myth or fact?  
Ariano R, Cecchi L, Voltolini S, Quercia O, Scopano E, Ciprandi G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;49(1):6-10
Click to view abstract

Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: Changes in sensitisation in the past 11 years and comparison with other centres in Mexico.  
Navarrete-Rodriguez EM, Fernandez-Soto JR, Del Rio-Navarro BE, Saucedo-Ramirez OJ, Sienra-Monge JJ.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Jan;45(1):11-17
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Food allergy in Catalonia: Clinical manifestations and its association with airborne allergens.  
Sanchez-Lopez J, Gazquez V, Rubira N, Valdesoiro L, Guilarte M, Garcia-Moral A, Depreux N, Soto-Retes L, De MM, Luengo O, Lleonart R, Basagana M.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Jan;45(1):48-54
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Drug eruption caused by esomeprazole: A case report and mini-review.  
Taura M, Asai J, Wakabayashi Y, Masuda K, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2017 Jan 13;

Corrigendum to 'Prevention of food allergy - Early dietary interventions' [Allergol Int 65 (2016) 370-377].  
Du TG, Foong RX, Lack G.
Allergol Int 2017 Jan;66(1):159

Severe drug eruptions due to lamotrigine in Japan based on data from the relief system of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency.  
Saeki H, Yamada K, Morikawa N, Asahina A, Ochiai T, Iijima M.
Allergol Int 2017 Jan;66(1):156-158

Pla a 2 and Pla a 3 reactivities identify plane tree-allergic patients with respiratory symptoms or food allergy.  
Scala E, Cecchi L, Abeni D, Guerra EC, Pirrotta L, Locanto M, Giani M, Asero R.
Allergy 2017 Jan 2;
Click to view abstract

Conjunctival allergen provocation test : guidelines for daily practice.  
Fauquert JL, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Rondon C, Calder V, Silva D, Kvenshagen BK, Callebaut I, Allegri P, Santos N, Doan S, Perez FD, Chiambaretta F, Delgado L, Leonardi A.
Allergy 2017 Jan;72(1):43-54
Click to view abstract

The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored guidelines on preventing peanut allergy: A new paradigm in food allergy prevention.  
Greenhawt M.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2017 Jan 24;
Click to view abstract

Characteristics of children with food protein-induced enterocolitis and allergic proctocolitis.  
Yilmaz EA, Soyer O, Cavkaytar O, Karaatmaca B, Buyuktiryaki B, Sahiner UM, Sekerel BE, Sackesen C.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2017 Jan 1;38(1):54-62
Click to view abstract

Factors that determine parents' perception of their child's risk of life-threatening food-induced anaphylaxis.  
Ogg J, Wong J, Wan MW, Davis N, Arkwright PD.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2017 Jan 1;38(1):44-53
Click to view abstract

Clinical diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis in infancy.  
Dibek ME, Vezir E, Toyran M, Capanoglu M, Guvenir H, Civelek E, Kocabas CN.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2017 Jan 1;38(1):38-43
Click to view abstract

High rate of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic southern Ontario population.  
Rosenfield L, Tsoulis MW, Milio K, Schnittke M, Kim H.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;135
Click to view abstract

Local allergic rhinitis to pollens is underdiagnosed in young patients.  
Krajewska-Wojtys A, Jarzab J, Gawlik R, Bozek A.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Nov 1;30(6):198-201
Click to view abstract

Contact eczema of hands caused by contact with potato protein.  
Obtulowicz A, Pirowska M, Wojas-Pelc A.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2016 Jun 2;23(2):377-378
Click to view abstract

Mealtime behavior among parents and their young children with food allergy.  
Herbert LJ, Mehta P, Sharma H.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan 13;
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Effect of nasal allergen challenge in allergic rhinitis on mitochondrial function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.  
Qi S, Barnig C, Charles AL, Poirot A, Meyer A, Clere-Jehl R, de BF, Geny B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan 7;

Occupational asthma caused by sensitization to a cleaning product containing triclosan.  
Walters GI, Robertson AS, Moore VC, Burge PS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan 5;

Redness response phenotypes of allergic conjunctivitis in an allergen challenge chamber.  
Jacobs RL, Ramirez DA, Rather CG, Andrews CP, Jupiter DC, Trujillo F, Shulman DG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan;118(1):86-93
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Epidemiology of anaphylaxis at a tertiary care center: A report of 730 cases.  
Gonzalez-Estrada A, Silvers SK, Klein A, Zell K, Wang XF, Lang DM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan;118(1):80-85
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Stinging insect hypersensitivity: A practice parameter update 2016.  
Golden DB, Demain J, Freeman T, Graft D, Tankersley M, Tracy J, Blessing-Moore J, Bernstein D, Dinakar C, Greenhawt M, Khan D, Lang D, Nicklas R, Oppenheimer J, Portnoy J, Randolph C, Schu.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan;118(1):28-54

Deciphering the black box of food allergy mechanisms.  
Sampath V, Tupa D, Graham MT, Chatila TA, Spergel JM, Nadeau KC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan;118(1):21-27
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Anaphylaxis caused by immediate hypersensitivity to topical chlorhexidine in children.  
Lasa EM, Gonzalez C, Garcia-Lirio E, Martinez S, Arroabarren E, Gamboa PM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan;118(1):118-119

Fish allergy in patients with parvalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E depends on parvalbumin content rather than molecular differences in the protein among fish species.  
Kobayashi A, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2016 Oct;80(10):2018-2021
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.  
Stephen JN, Sharp MF, Ruethers T, Taki A, Campbell DE, Lopata AL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2017 Jan 24;
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Use of baked milk challenges and milk ladders in clinical practice: a worldwide survey of healthcare professionals.  
Athanasopoulou P, Deligianni E, Dean T, Dewey A, Venter C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2017 Jan 21;
Click to view abstract

Three cases of anaphylaxis following injection of a depot corticosteroid with evidence of IgE sensitization to macrogols rather than the active steroid.  
Brandt N, Garvey LH, Bindslev-Jensen U, Kjaer HF, Bindslev-Jensen C, Mortz CG.
Clin Transl Allergy 2017;72
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Immunology of Bee Venom.  
Elieh Ali KD, Shafaghat F, Zwiener RD.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2017 Jan 20;
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Review of Diagnostic Challenges in Occupational Asthma.  
Pralong JA, Cartier A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Jan;17(1):1
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Pollen Overload: Seasonal Allergies in a Changing Climate.  
Schmidt CW.
Environ Health Perspect 2016 Apr;124(4):A70-A75

Tattooing agents and adverse reactions. [German]  
Wagner G, Meyer V, Sachse MM.
Hautarzt 2016 Mar;67(3):234-241
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Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs among Adults: Clinical Features and Risk Factors for Diagnosis Confirmation.  
Rebelo GE, Geraldes L, Gaspar A, Malheiro D, Cadinha S, Abreu C, Chambel M, Almeida E, Faria E.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;171(3-4):269-275
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Immediate Type Hypersensitivity to Heparins: Two Case Reports and a Review of the Literature.  
Cesana P, Scherer K, Bircher AJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;171(3-4):285-289
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Adult Food Allergy Prevalence: Reducing Questionnaire Bias.  
Silva LA, Silva AF, Ribeiro AC, Silva AO, Vieira FA, Segundo GR.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;171(3-4):261-264
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Enhanced Prophylactic and Therapeutic Effects of Polylysine-Modified Ara h 2 DNA Vaccine in a Mouse Model of Peanut Allergy.  
Zhu Z, Yu J, Niu Y, Sun S, Liu Y, Saxon A, Zhang K, Li W.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016;171(3-4):241-250
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Aspirin tolerance in patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-exacerbated respiratory disease following treatment with omalizumab.  
Phillips-Angles E, Barranco P, Lluch-Bernal M, Dominguez-Ortega J, Lopez-Carrasco V, Quirce S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 20;

Food-Allergic Adolescents at Risk for Anaphylaxis: A Randomized Controlled Study of Supervised Injection to Improve Comfort with Epinephrine Self-Injection.  
Shemesh E, D'Urso C, Knight C, Rubes M, Picerno KM, Posillico AM, Atal Z, Annunziato RA, Sicherer SH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 20;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to tranexamic acid-a rare reaction to a common drug.  
Li PH, Trigg C, Rutkowski R, Rutkowski K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 20;

Threshold dose distribution in walnut allergy.  
Blankestijn MA, Remington BC, Houben GF, Baumert JL, Knulst AC, Blom WM, Klemans RJ, Taylor SL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 18;
Click to view abstract

Adverse and Hypersensitivity Reactions to Prescription Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents in a Large Health Care System.  
Blumenthal KG, Lai KH, Huang M, Wallace ZS, Wickner PG, Zhou L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 18;
Click to view abstract

Increasing Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis, 2005-2014.  
Motosue MS, Bellolio MF, Van Houten HK, Shah ND, Campbell RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan;5(1):171-175
Click to view abstract

Allergen-dependent oxidant formation requires purinoceptor activation of ADAM 10 and prothrombin.  
Chen J, Zhang J, Tachie-Menson T, Shukla N, Garrod DR, Robinson C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 19;

A single intervention for cockroach control reduces cockroach exposure and asthma morbidity in children.  
Rabito FA, Carlson JC, He H, Werthmann D, Schal C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 10;
Click to view abstract

LEAPing forward with the new guidelines.  
Wood RA, Burks AW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;139(1):52-53

Comparing sensitivity of Hymenoptera allergen components on different diagnostic assay systems: Comparing apples and oranges?  
Jakob T, Spillner E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 3;

Critical and direct involvement of the CD23 stalk region in IgE binding.  
Selb R, Eckl-Dorna J, Twaroch TE, Lupinek C, Teufelberger A, Hofer G, Focke-Tejkl M, Gepp B, Linhart B, Breiteneder H, Ellinger A, Keller W, Roux KH, Valenta R, Niederberger V.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;139(1):281-289
Click to view abstract

A humanized mouse model of anaphylactic peanut allergy.  
Burton OT, Stranks AJ, Tamayo JM, Koleoglou KJ, Schwartz LB, Oettgen HC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan;139(1):314-322
Click to view abstract

Does the Medical Diagnosis of Occupational Asthma Coincide With the Legal Diagnosis?  
Celebi SZ, Aydin O, Demirel YS, Soyyigit S, Cerci P, Kendirlinan R, Bavbek S, Celik GE, Misirligil Z, Sin BA, Kelesoglu A, Mungan D.
J Asthma 2017 Jan 5;0
Click to view abstract

Heterogeneity in allergy to mollusks: a clinical-immunological study in a population from the North of Spain.  
Azofra J, Echechipia S, Irazabal B, Munoz D, Bernedo N, Garcia BE, Gastaminza G, Goikoetxea MJ, Joral A, Lasa E, Gamboa P, Diaz C, Beristain A, Quinones D, Bernaola G, Echenagusia MA, Liar.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 3;0

Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test. [German]  
Sennekamp J, Lehmann E.
Pneumologie 2015 Nov;69(11):638-644
Click to view abstract

Is allergic sensitization relevant in severe asthma? Which allergens may be culprit?  
Lombardi C, Savi E, Ridolo E, Passalacqua G, Canonica GW.
World Allergy Organ J 2017;10(1):2
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