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 Allergy Advisor Digest - November 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read A pilot study to assess relationship between total IgE and 95% predictive decision points of food specific IgE concentration.
Read Cofactors and comorbidities in patients with aspirin/NSAID hypersensitivity.
Read Parent-reported prevalence of food allergy in Mexican schoolchildren.
Read Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children.
Read Lip b 1 is a novel allergenic protein isolated from the booklouse
Read Cashew allergy risks, 2S albumins, and predictions based on IgE antibody levels.
Read Six years without Pholcodine; Norwegians are significantly less IgE-sensitized and clinically more tolerant to neuromuscular blocking agents.
Read A new framework for the interpretation of IgE sensitization tests.
Read Clinical significance of component allergens in Fagales pollen-sensitized peanut allergy in Korea.
Read Wheezing in tobacco farm workers in southern Brazil.
Read Analysis of 10 environmental allergen components of the American cockroach in Taiwan.
Read Urtica dioica pollen allergy: Clinical, biological, and allergomics analysis.
Read The ingestion of cow's milk formula in the first 3 months of life prevents the development of cow's milk allergy.
Read Standardization of double blind placebo controlled food challenge with soy within a multicentre trial.
Read Childcare and school management issues in food allergy.
Read How In vitro assays contribute to allergy diagnosis.
Read Occupational respiratory allergic diseases in Healthcare Workers.
Read Management of hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: A retrospective experience.
Read Racial differences in food allergy phenotype and health care utilization among US Children.
Read Increase in allergic sensitization in schoolchildren: two cohorts compared 10 years apart.
Read Conducting an oral food challenge to peanut in an infant.
Read IgG and IgG4 to 91 allergenic molecules in early childhood by route of exposure and current and future IgE sensitization: Results from the Multicentre Allergy Study birth cohort.
Read Allergy to cashew [French]
Read Structural and functional characterization of the major allergen Amb a 11 from Short Ragweed pollen.

Abstracts shared in November 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Matrix effect on baked milk tolerance in children with IgE cow milk allergy.
Read Anaphylaxis induced by ingested molds.
Read Rye-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Contribution of Leptosphaeria species ascospores to autumn asthma in areas of oilseed rape production.
Read Immediate systemic allergic reaction in an infant to fish allergen ingested through breast milk.
Read Lupin and other potentially cross-reactive allergens in peanut allergy.
Read High alcohol consumption causes high IgE levels but not high risk of allergic disease.
Read The link between soda intake and asthma: science points to the high-fructose corn syrup, not the preservatives: a commentary.
Read Cross-eating insect allergens
Read Characteristics of a group of 21 patients allergic to meat by sensitization to allergens alpha-Gal
Read Allergy to flax seed: general review of an observation

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A pilot study to assess relationship between total IgE and 95% predictive decision points of food specific IgE concentration.
False positive test results in children who are tested for food allergies may lead to inappropriate dietary restrictions. The aim of this study was to report the authors experience with a 3 year-old boy, who presented with 'multiple food allergies' and, however, passed the food challenges, and to review their experience regarding management of children with high specific food IgEs with high total IgE. Medical records of 16 children with food challenges were reviewed. Median age of subjects was 39 months, with a history of adverse clinical reaction to a food, a specific IgE greater than the decision point, and an elevated total serum IgE level of 500 IU, underwent challenges to the offending food. 13 out of 16 subjects were successfully re-exposed to the suspected foods and continued to tolerate these foods well. Our finding suggests a much lower clinical risk with previously defined specific IgE decision points in children with very high levels of total IgE (> 6000 IU/ml)

A pilot study to assess relationship between total IgE and 95% predictive decision points of food specific IgE concentration.  
Yousef E, Haque AS.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;48(6):233-236

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cofactors and comorbidities in patients with aspirin/NSAID hypersensitivity.
Hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin and other NSAIDs occur in individuals genetically predisposed and exhibit different clinical manifestations, especially respiratory, cutaneous, and generalised. Five different phenotypes define distinct clinical pictures: aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, aspirin/NSAID cutaneous disease, NSAID-induced urticaria, angio-oedema and anaphylaxis, single NSAID reactions, and delayed reactions. They are observed more frequently in middle-aged women, and in atopic individuals. While ASA/NSAID hypersensitivity shares comorbidities with asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, chronic urticaria and angio-oedema, ASA and other NSAIDs can also be cofactors for other clinically relevant conditions, especially food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, angio-oedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and oral mite anaphylaxis. Awareness on these relationships is required for the correct diagnosis, classification, and treatment of affected patients.

Cofactors and comorbidities in patients with aspirin/NSAID hypersensitivity.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Caballero-Fonseca F, Capriles-Hulett A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Parent-reported prevalence of food allergy in Mexican schoolchildren.
A validated Spanish version of a structured written questionnaire was administered to parents of schoolchildren aged 5-13 years old from Culiacan, Mexico. A total of 1049 parents responded to the survey (response rate, 84%). The estimated prevalence rates (95% CI) were: adverse food reactions 10.0% (8.3-11.9), 'perceived FA, ever' 5.5% (4.3-7.0), 'physician-diagnosed FA, ever' 4.9% (3.7-6.3), 'immediate-type FA, ever' 4.4% (3.3-5.8), 'immediate-type FA, current' 3.5% (2.6-4.8), and anaphylaxis 1.2% (0.72-2.1). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions were mainly triggered by the consumption of shrimp (1.3%), other shellfish (0.7%), strawberry (0.6%), chocolate (0.5%), and egg (0.4%).

Parent-reported prevalence of food allergy in Mexican schoolchildren: A population-based study.  
Ontiveros N, Valdez-Meza EE, Vergara-Jimenez MJ, Canizalez-Roman A, Borzutzky A, Cabrera-Chavez F.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov;44(6):563-570

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children.
Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently encountered in daily clinical practice. This study suggests the presence of different phenotypes which do not fit into the current classifications in children with NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine the confirmation rates, risk factors of NSAID hypersensitivity in children and to try to classify them with a standardized diagnostic protocol. All patients with a suspicion of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity were evaluated with European Network for drug Allergy (ENDA) recommendations. The children were classified as selective responders (SRs) or cross-intolerant (CI) depending on the drug provocation test (DPT) results. 106 children with a suspicion of NSAID hypersensitivity. NSAID hypersensitivity was confirmed with tests in 31 patients; 4 (12.9%) were diagnosed by skin tests and 27 (87.1%) by DPTs and two patients with a history of anaphylaxis by medical records. Eleven patients (33.3%) were classified as SRs, whereas twenty-two (66.6%) children as CIs. SRs and CIs were further classified as NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema (n = 8), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (n = 6) and NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (n = 1) and single NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema and/or anaphylaxis (n = 11). Eight (24.2%) patients could not be categorized according to ENDA/GA2LEN classification; one CI patient could not be classified based on pathomechanisms, seven CIs could not be categorized based on the underlying disease and clinical manifestations. A reaction within an hour of drug intake (aOR:3.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-7.67, p = 0.021), a history with multiple NSAIDs hypersensitivity (aOR:2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-7.60, p = 0.022), and family history of atopy (aOR:4.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.50-10.82, p = 0.006) were found as the independent risk factors related to confirmed NSAID

Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children.  
Arikoglu T, Aslan G, Yildirim DD, Batmaz SB, Kuyucu S.
Allergol Int 2016 Nov 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lip b 1 is a novel allergenic protein isolated from the booklouse
Booklice, belonging to the order Psocoptera, are small household insect pests that are distributed worldwide. Liposcelis bostrychophila (L. bostrychophila), a common home-inhabiting species of booklouse, infests old books, sheets of paper and stored food. Recent entomological and serological studies demonstrated that L. bostrychophila accounted for the majority of detectable insects in house dust and could be a potent inducer of respiratory allergy. Cloning of cDNAs for Lip b 1 was performed. Lip b 1 is a novel protein possibly causing booklouse allergy.

Lip b 1 is a novel allergenic protein isolated from the booklouse, Liposcelis bostrychophila.  
Ishibashi O, Sakuragi K, Fukutomi Y, Kawakami Y, Kamata Y, Sakurai M, Nakayama S, Uchiyama H, Kobayashi H, Kojima H, Inui T.
Allergy 2016 Nov 22;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cashew allergy risks, 2S albumins, and predictions based on IgE antibody levels.
"We read with great interest the report of Lange et al (1) that studied cashew allergic children and the potential predictive value of cashew 2S albumin storage protein (Ana o 3)-specific IgE measurements in determining the need for an oral cashew challenge to prove disease. They report that IgE antibody levels >2 kUA /l to Ana o 3 improved their prediction (95% probability) of a positive oral food challenge after cashew consumption in comparison to IgE against the whole cashew extract". "Predictions on allergic clinical outcomes using a single IgE antibody analysis involving components such as a 2S albumin would be nice to have, but it is not as straight forward as many studies such as cashew component investigation of Lange et al (1) suggest. A successful diagnostic allergy work-up still requires individually planned diagnostic steps and proper interpretation, while always taking into consideration the historical context of the patient on a case by case basis."

Cashew allergy risks, 2S albumins, and predictions based on IgE antibody levels.  
Kleine-Tebbe J, Hamilton RG.
Allergy 2016 Nov 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Six years without Pholcodine; Norwegians are significantly less IgE-sensitized and clinically more tolerant to neuromuscular blocking agents.
Six years without pholcodine (PHO); Norwegians are significantly less IgE-sensitized and clinically more tolerant to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs). From baseline period P0 (PHO on the market) through the first (P1) and second (P2) three year periods after withdrawal, significant falls in total reports (p<0.001) and reports with IgE-antibodies to PHO (p=0.008) and SUX (p=0.001) at time of reaction were found. Total NMBA sales in P2 were 83% of P0, SUX and rocuronium (ROC) together made up 86% of sales throughout the study. Five NMBA related anaphylactic deaths occurred during P0 and P1, however, none during P2. Prevalence of IgE-sensitization to SUX in 'allergics' fell to 0% at 4 and 5 years after withdrawal.

Six years without Pholcodine; Norwegians are significantly less IgE-sensitized and clinically more tolerant to neuromuscular blocking agents.  
de Pater GH, Florvaag E, Johansson SG, Irgens A, Petersen MN, Guttormsen AB.
Allergy 2016 Nov 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A new framework for the interpretation of IgE sensitization tests.
IgE sensitization tests, such as skin prick testing and serum-specific IgE, have been used to diagnose IgE-mediated clinical allergy for many years. Their prime drawback is that they detect sensitization which is only loosely related to clinical allergy. Many patients therefore require provocation tests to make a definitive diagnosis; these are often expensive and potentially associated with severe reactions. The likelihood of clinical allergy can be semi-quantified from an IgE sensitization test results. This relationship varies though according to the patients' age, ethnicity, nature of the putative allergic reaction and coexisting clinical diseases such as eczema. The likelihood of clinical allergy can be more precisely estimated from an IgE sensitization test result, by taking into account the patient's presenting features (pretest probability). The presence of each of these patient-specific factors may mean that a patient is more or less likely to have clinical allergy with a given test result (post-test probability). We present two approaches to include pretest probabilities in the interpretation of results. These approaches are currently limited by a lack of data to allow us to derive pretest probabilities for diverse setting, regions and allergens. Also, cofactors, such as exercise, may be necessary for exposure to an allergen to result in an allergic reaction in specific IgE-positive patients. The diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergy is now being aided by the introduction of allergen component testing which may identify clinically relevant sensitization. Other approaches are in development with basophil activation testing being closest to clinical application

A new framework for the interpretation of IgE sensitization tests.  
Roberts G, Ollert M, Aalberse R, Austin M, Custovic A, DunnGalvin A, Eigenmann PA, Fassio F, Grattan C, Hellings P, Hourihane J, Knol E, Muraro A, Papadopoulos N, Santos AF, Schnadt S, Tzeli K.
Allergy 2016 Nov;71(11):1540-1551

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical significance of component allergens in Fagales pollen-sensitized peanut allergy in Korea.
The purpose of this Korean study was to discriminate true peanut food allergy from cross-reactive hypersensitivity in birch-sensitized peanut allergy. Birch-sensitized (n=81) and peanut anaphylaxis patients (n=12) were enrolled. Specific IgE to Fagales tree pollens (birch, oak), peanut, and their component allergens (Bet v 1, Bet v 2, Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 8, and Ara h 9) were evaluated. After peanut consumption, one-third of OAS patients experienced oral symptoms not associated with peanut sensitization. Ara h 1 or Ara h 2 was positive in peanut anaphylaxis patients, whereas Ara h 8 was positive in OAS patients. There were 4 patients with both peanut anaphylaxis and OAS (group 3). Both Ara h 2 and Ara h 8 were positive in these patients. Foods associated with OAS in Korea showed unique patterns compared to Westernized countries. Ara h 2 and Ara h 8 may be important component allergens for discriminating peanut allergy.

Clinical significance of component allergens in Fagales pollen-sensitized peanut allergy in Korea.  
Park KH, Son YW, Lee SC, Jeong K, Sim dW, Park HJ, Lee S, Lee JH, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Nov;8(6):505-511

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheezing in tobacco farm workers in southern Brazil.
Tobacco workers are exposed to several respiratory occupational sensitizers. A representative cross-sectional study was carried out on 2469 tobacco family farming growers. Wheezing prevalence was 11.0% with no difference between genders. Among men, age, smoking, strenuous work, pesticide use, contact with vegetable dust and dried tobacco dust, lifting sticks with tobacco leaves to the curing barns, and green tobacco sickness (GTS) were risk factors for wheezing. Among women, family history of asthma, tying hands of tobacco, strenuous work, contact with chemical disinfectants, and GTS were positively associated with wheezing. Harvesting lower tobacco leaves was a protective factor for the outcome in both genders.

Wheezing in tobacco farm workers in southern Brazil.  
Fiori NS, Fassa AG, Faria NM, Meucci RD, Miranda VI, Christiani DC.
Am J Ind Med 2015 Nov;58(11):1217-1228

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of 10 environmental allergen components of the American cockroach in Taiwan.
American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is the second leading inhalant allergen causing allergic airway diseases in Taiwan. This study analyzed the environmental profile of American cockroach allergen components. Polyclonal antibodies were generated to recombinant American cockroach allergens, Per a 1 through Per a 10. Per a 1, 2, and 10 proteins were present predominantly in roach feces, whereas other allergen components were found predominantly in roach bodies. There was a time-dependent decrease in total levels of some allergen proteins. Although levels of Per a 4, 5, 6, and 9 significantly decreased to less 20% of the basal level, there was no significant change in levels of Per a 2, 7, and 10 after 1-year decomposition. The most abundant allergen components in 20 dust samples from patients' houses were Per a 9, Per a 10, and Per a 2. Per a 2 and Per a 10 can be used as markers of long-term environmental cockroach control and Per a 9 as current status of control in patients' houses.

Analysis of 10 environmental allergen components of the American cockroach in Taiwan.  
Lee MF, Chen YH, Chiang CH, Lin SJ, Song PP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):535-541

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Urtica dioica pollen allergy: Clinical, biological, and allergomics analysis.
The most emblematic members of Urticaceae at allergic risk level are wall pellitories (Parietaria), whereas nettle (Urtica) pollen is considered as poorly allergenic. No allergen from nettle pollen has yet been characterized. This study characterized the allergic reaction and identify the potential nettle pollen sensitizing allergens. The results of biological and immunochemical analyses revealed that the allergic rhinitis was due to Urtica dioica pollen in both patients. The allergomic analysis of nettle pollen extract allowed the characterization of 4 basic protein allergens: a thaumatin-like protein (osmotin) with a relative molecular mass of 27 to 29 kDa, a pectinesterase (relative molecular mass, 40 kDa), and 2 other basic proteins with relative molecular masses of 14 to 16 kDa and 43 kDa. There is no or only very weak allergen associations between pellitory and nettle pollen.

Urtica dioica pollen allergy: Clinical, biological, and allergomics analysis.  
Tiotiu A, Brazdova A, Longe C, Gallet P, Morisset M, Leduc V, Hilger C, Broussard C, Couderc R, Sutra JP, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):527-534

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The ingestion of cow's milk formula in the first 3 months of life prevents the development of cow's milk allergy.
This study concludes that ingestion of CMF during the first 3 months of life might prevent the development of CMA in high-risk infants

The ingestion of cow's milk formula in the first 3 months of life prevents the development of cow's milk allergy.  
Sakihara T, Sugiura S, Ito K.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Oct;6(4):207-212

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Standardization of double blind placebo controlled food challenge with soy within a multicentre trial.
This study aimed at developing a standardized approach for identifying patients with birch related soy allergy by means of DBPCFC to soy, including determination of threshold levels, in a multicentre setting. Microbiologically stable soy challenge meals were composed of protein isolate with consistent Gly m 4 levels. Patients sensitized to main birch allergen Bet v 1 and concomitant sensitization to its soy homologue Gly m 4 underwent DBPCFC. 138 adult subjects (63.8% female, mean age 38 years) underwent DBPCFC. 45.7% presented with objective signs and 65.2% with subjective symptoms at soy challenge. Placebo challenge meals elicited non-cardiovascular objective signs in 11.6%. In 82 (59.4%) subjects DBPCFC was judged as positive. 70.7% of DPBCFC+ showed objective signs and 85.4% subjective symptoms at soy challenge. Subjective symptoms to soy challenge meal in DBPCFC+ subjects started at significantly lower dose levels than objective signs (p < 0.001). Median cumulative eliciting doses for first objective signs in DBPCFC+ subjects were 4.7 g [0.7-24.7] and 0.7 g [0.2-4.7] total soy protein for first subjective symptoms (p = 0.01).

Standardization of double blind placebo controlled food challenge with soy within a multicentre trial.  
Treudler R, Franke A, Schmiedeknecht A, Ballmer-Weber BK, Worm M, Werfel T, Jappe U, Biedermann T, Schmitt J, Brehler R, Kleinheinz A, Kleine-Tebbe J, Bruning H, Rueff F, Ring J, Saloga J.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;639

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Childcare and school management issues in food allergy.
An increasing number of school-aged children have food allergies, and studies show that a significant number of school children with no known history of allergies will experience their first anaphylactic reaction at school. Stock-unassigned epinephrine auto-injectors are recommended in schools but not mandatory in most states, and therefore, epinephrine is not always available. Non-nursing staff members are sometimes administering epinephrine due to limitations in nurse staffing. Wide variations in staff training and lack of stock epinephrine leave many schools inadequately prepared to manage anaphylactic reactions. Emphasis should be placed not only on ensuring all schools have stock epinephrine but also on training a wider range of school staff members to minimize treatment delay with epinephrine and improve clinical outcomes

Childcare and school management issues in food allergy.  
Tsuang A, Wang J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(12):83

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
How In vitro assays contribute to allergy diagnosis.
Diagnosis of allergic disorders is based upon the clinical history of the disease, the immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody response, and the allergen exposure. During the last decade, many changes have occurred in the in vitro diagnostic tests used in daily practice. The most important one is the use of allergenic molecules, which helps to define severe profile of allergy and/or to better understand cross-reactivity. The correlation between IgE sensitization and bronchial or nasal response in provocation tests is not so clear, which implies that such tests are still helpful in allergy diagnosis. In order to strengthen the link between a real allergen exposure and allergic symptoms, environmental allergen load assessment can be performed. For clinicians, it appears obvious to know the pollen count to treat their patients; however, they rarely measure the allergen load in the indoor environment, while nowadays home-tests (semi-quantitative or quantitative) make the assessment very easy. In the future, assessment of the environmental exposure (preferably with an indoor technician) of an allergic patient should take into account not only the allergens but also the other indoor pollutants, which could enhance respiratory symptoms in allergic patients.

How In vitro assays contribute to allergy diagnosis.  
Casset A, Khayath N, de Blay F.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(11):82

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational respiratory allergic diseases in Healthcare Workers.
Healthcare workers (HCWs) are exposed to a range of high and low molecular weight agents that are allergic sensitizers or irritants including cleaners and disinfectants, natural rubber latex, and various medications. Studies have shown that exposed HCWs are at risk for work-related rhinitis and asthma (WRA). Work-related rhinitis may precede development of WRA and should be considered as an early marker of WRA. Avoidance of causative exposures through control strategies such as elimination, substitution, engineering controls, and process modification is the preferred primary prevention strategy for preventing development of work-related allergic diseases. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of respirators in preventing occupational asthma. If sensitizer-induced WRA is diagnosed, it is important to avoid further exposure to the causative agent, preferably by more rigorous application of exposure control strategies to the workplace. This review focuses on allergic occupational respiratory diseases in HCWs

Occupational respiratory allergic diseases in Healthcare Workers.  
Mazurek JM, Weissman DN.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(11):77

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Management of hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: A retrospective experience.
The authors previously reported perfect specificity and low sensitivity of skin tests in proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions in a prospective multicenter study. In this retrospective study, they aimed to further evaluate the diagnostic workup procedures and characteristics of the patients with suspected PPI hypersensitivity. This national multicenter study was conducted as a retrospective chart review of patients with a history of PPI-induced immediate hypersensitivity reaction. A total of 60 patients were included. Lansoprazole was the most commonly suspected drug with 41 patients (68.3%), followed by pantoprazole in 12 patients (20.0%), esomeprazole in 6 (10.0%), rabeprazole in 4 (6.7%), and omeprazole in 1 (1.7%). Anaphylaxis (40 patients, 66.7%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by urticaria (17 patients, 28.3%). Diagnostic skin tests with the culprit PPI were positive in 13/26 patients (50.0%). Diagnostic oral-provocation tests were negative in 6/8 patients; 5 of these 6 patients had skin test results with the culprit PPI, and all were negative. Ten patients had at least 1 cross-reactivity. Extensive cross-reactivity (between >2 PPIs) was detected in 4 patients.

Management of hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: A retrospective experience.  
Kepil OS, Oner EF, Unal D, Buyukozturk S, Gelincik A, Dursun AB, Karakaya G, Bavbek S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Nov 12;171(1):54-60

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Racial differences in food allergy phenotype and health care utilization among US Children.
Food allergy phenotypes and health care utilization differ among children of different racial and/or ethnic backgrounds in the United States that put AA and Hispanic children at higher risks of adverse outcome than white children. These differences include coexistent atopic conditions, less well recognized food allergens, and higher rates of anaphylaxis.

Racial differences in food allergy phenotype and health care utilization among US Children.  
Mahdavinia M, Fox SR, Smith BM, James C, Palmisano EL, Mohamed A, Zahid Z, Assa'ad AH, Tobin MC, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 22;

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Increase in allergic sensitization in schoolchildren: two cohorts compared 10 years apart.
Time trends of incidence of allergic sensitization are unknown and recent trends of prevalence and risk factors are lacking. This Swedish study estimated the incidence, prevalence, remission, risk factors, and time trends for allergic sensitization among schoolchildren followed from age 7 to 8 years to age 11 to 12 years. In 2006, all children in grades 1 and 2 aged 7 to 8 years in 2 municipalities in northern Sweden were invited to a questionnaire survey and to skin prick testing to 10 common airborne allergens. The cohort was reexamined in 2010, with additional blood sampling for specific IgE. The prevalence of positive skin prick test result to any allergen increased from 30% at age 7 to 8 years to 41% at age 11 to 12 years (P < .001). The cumulative 4-year incidence was 18%, while remission was low. Sensitization to pollen and furred animals was most common. The study concludes that the prevalence of allergic sensitization increased by age as a consequence of a high incidence and a low remission. The trends of increasing incidence and prevalence among schoolchildren imply future increases in the prevalence of allergic diseases.

Increase in allergic sensitization in schoolchildren: two cohorts compared 10 years apart.  
Bunne J, Moberg H, Hedman L, Andersson M, Bjerg A, Lundback B, Ronmark E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Conducting an oral food challenge to peanut in an infant.
Results from the Learning Early About Peanut trial and its follow-up study suggest that early peanut introduction in the diets of high-risk infants may prevent the development of peanut allergy. Allergy organizations around the world released a unified statement, the Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction and the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High Risk Infants, in response to results from the Learning Early About Peanut trial, which recommends early introduction of peanut into the diet of those children at greatest risk of development of peanut allergy. As a result, it is expected that practicing allergists will experience an increased demand to perform an oral food challenge (OFC) in infants. Allergists often perform OFCs; however, conducting an OFC in an infant creates unique circumstances that have not been considered in previously published OFC guideline documents. The purpose of this workgroup report is to provide guidance to practitioners regarding the proper approach for conducting a peanut challenge in an infant

Conducting an oral food challenge to peanut in an infant.  
Bird JA, Groetch M, Allen KJ, Bock SA, Leonard S, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Sicherer S, Clark A, Fleischer DM, Venter C, Vickery B, Young MC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;

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IgG and IgG4 to 91 allergenic molecules in early childhood by route of exposure and current and future IgE sensitization: Results from the Multicentre Allergy Study birth cohort.
Studies of a limited number of allergens suggested that nonsensitized children produce IgG responses mainly to foodborne allergens, whereas IgE-sensitized children also produce strong IgG responses to the respective airborne molecules. The authors sought to systematically test the hypothesis that both the route of exposure and IgE sensitization affect IgG responses to a broad array of allergenic molecules in early childhood. The study concludes that the children's repertoire of IgG antibodies at 2 years of age to a broad array of animal foodborne, vegetable foodborne, and airborne allergenic molecules is profoundly dependent on the route of allergen exposure and the child's IgE sensitization status and only marginally involves the IgG4 isotype.

IgG and IgG4 to 91 allergenic molecules in early childhood by route of exposure and current and future IgE sensitization: Results from the Multicentre Allergy Study birth cohort.  
Schwarz A, Panetta V, Cappella A, Hofmaier S, Hatzler L, Rohrbach A, Tsilochristou O, Bauer CP, Hoffmann U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, D'Amelio R, Wahn U, Keil T, Lau S, Matricardi PM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;138(5):1426-1433

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to cashew [French]
The purpose of this study is to summarise current knowledge about cashew nut allergy, including botanical data, epidemiological data, the clinical characteristics of allergic populations, cross-reactivity, diagnostic criteria, and current and emerging treatment methods.

Allergy to cashew [French]  
Q. Haumonté, E. Beaudouin, VM Nguyen, J. Picaud, H. Thomas, J. Corriger, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):567-572

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Structural and functional characterization of the major allergen Amb a 11 from Short Ragweed pollen.
To better characterize Amb a 11, a recombinant proform of the molecule with a preserved active site was produced in Escherichia coli, refolded, and processed in vitro into a mature enzyme. The allergenicity of Amb a 11 was confirmed in a murine sensitization model, resulting in airway inflammation, production of serum IgEs, and induction of Th2 immune responses. Of note, inflammatory responses were higher with the mature form, demonstrating that the cysteine protease activity critically contributes to the allergenicity of the molecule. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that Amb a 11 is a bona fide cysteine protease exhibiting a strong allergenicity.

Structural and functional characterization of the major allergen Amb a 11 from Short Ragweed pollen.  
Groeme R, Airouche S, Kopecny D, Jaekel J, Savko M, Berjont N, Bussieres L, Le MM, Jagic F, Zieglmayer P, Baron-Bodo V, Bordas-Le F, Mascarell L, Briozzo P, Moingeon P.
J Biol Chem 2016 Jun 17;291(25):13076-13087

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Febuxostat hypersensitivity: another cause of DRESS syndrome in chronic kidney disease?  
Paschou E, Gavriilaki E, Papaioannou G, Tsompanakou A, Kalaitzoglou A, Sabanis N.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;48(6):251-255
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A pilot study to assess relationship between total IgE and 95% predictive decision points of food specific IgE concentration.  
Yousef E, Haque AS.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;48(6):233-236
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Hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics: a three-year study.  
Mota I, Gaspar A, Chambel M, Piedade S, Morais-Almeida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;48(6):212-219
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Cofactors and comorbidities in patients with aspirin/NSAID hypersensitivity.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Caballero-Fonseca F, Capriles-Hulett A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov 16;
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Alternaria alternata acts on human Monocyte-derived Dendritic cells to mediate Th2/Th17 polarisation.  
Loghmani A, Raoofi R, Ownagh A, Delirezh N.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov 4;
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Matrix effect on baked milk tolerance in children with IgE cow milk allergy.  
Miceli SS, Greco M, Monaco S, Bianchi A, Cuomo B, Liotti L, Iacono ID.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov;44(6):517-523
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Parent-reported prevalence of food allergy in Mexican schoolchildren: A population-based study.  
Ontiveros N, Valdez-Meza EE, Vergara-Jimenez MJ, Canizalez-Roman A, Borzutzky A, Cabrera-Chavez F.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Nov;44(6):563-570
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Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children.  
Arikoglu T, Aslan G, Yildirim DD, Batmaz SB, Kuyucu S.
Allergol Int 2016 Nov 16;
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Green, Yellow and Red risk perception in everyday life - a communication tool.  
Stensgaard A, DunnGalvin A, Nielsen D, Munch M, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Allergy 2016 Nov 25;
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Coping strategies, alexithymia and anxiety in young patients with food allergy.  
Polloni L, DunnGalvin A, Ferruzza E, Bonaguro R, Lazzarotto F, Toniolo A, Celegato N, Muraro A.
Allergy 2016 Nov 25;
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Field-testing the new anaphylaxis' classification for the who International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 revision.  
Tanno LK, Molinari N, Bruel S, Bourrain JL, Calderon MA, Aubas P, Demoly P.
Allergy 2016 Nov 22;
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Lip b 1 is a novel allergenic protein isolated from the booklouse, Liposcelis bostrychophila.  
Ishibashi O, Sakuragi K, Fukutomi Y, Kawakami Y, Kamata Y, Sakurai M, Nakayama S, Uchiyama H, Kobayashi H, Kojima H, Inui T.
Allergy 2016 Nov 22;
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Detection of drug-responsive B-lymphocytes and anti-drug IgG in patients with beta-lactam hypersensitivity.  
Amali MO, Sullivan A, Jenkins RE, Farrell J, Meng X, Faulkner L, Whitaker P, Peckham D, Park BK, Naisbitt DJ.
Allergy 2016 Nov 15;
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Cashew allergy risks, 2S albumins, and predictions based on IgE antibody levels.  
Kleine-Tebbe J, Hamilton RG.
Allergy 2016 Nov 15;
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Six years without Pholcodine; Norwegians are significantly less IgE-sensitized and clinically more tolerant to neuromuscular blocking agents.  
de Pater GH, Florvaag E, Johansson SG, Irgens A, Petersen MN, Guttormsen AB.
Allergy 2016 Nov 9;
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Identification of Phenotypic Clusters of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.  
Lee HY, Ye YM, Kim SH, Ban GY, Kim SC, Kim J, Shin Y, Park HS.
Allergy 2016 Nov 2;
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Value-added reporting of specific IgE.  
Bossuyt X, Van HE, Ceuppens JL.
Allergy 2016 Nov;71(11):1644

Respiratory hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs in Europe: the global allergy and asthma network (GA2 LEN) survey.  
Makowska JS, Burney P, Jarvis D, Keil T, Tomassen P, Bislimovska J, Brozek G, Bachert C, Baelum J, Bindslev-Jensen C, Bousquet J, Bousquet PJ, Kai-Hakon C, Dahlen SE, Dahlen B, Fokkens WJ.
Allergy 2016 Nov;71(11):1603-1611
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A new framework for the interpretation of IgE sensitization tests.  
Roberts G, Ollert M, Aalberse R, Austin M, Custovic A, DunnGalvin A, Eigenmann PA, Fassio F, Grattan C, Hellings P, Hourihane J, Knol E, Muraro A, Papadopoulos N, Santos AF, Schnadt S, Tzeli K.
Allergy 2016 Nov;71(11):1540-1551
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A multicenter retrospective case study of anaphylaxis triggers by age in Korean children.  
Lee SY, Ahn K, Kim J, Jang GC, Min TK, Yang HJ, Pyun BY, Kwon JW, Sohn MH, Kim KW, Kim KE, Yu J, Hong SJ, Kwon JH, Kim SW, Song TW, Kim WK, Kim HY, Jeon YH, Lee YJ, Lee HR, Kim HY, Ahn Y, Yum HY, .
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Nov;8(6):535-540
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Clinical significance of component allergens in Fagales pollen-sensitized peanut allergy in Korea.  
Park KH, Son YW, Lee SC, Jeong K, Sim dW, Park HJ, Lee S, Lee JH, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Nov;8(6):505-511
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Wheezing in tobacco farm workers in southern Brazil.  
Fiori NS, Fassa AG, Faria NM, Meucci RD, Miranda VI, Christiani DC.
Am J Ind Med 2015 Nov;58(11):1217-1228
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Isocyanates and work-related asthma: Findings from California, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey, 1993-2008.  
Lefkowitz D, Pechter E, Fitzsimmons K, Lumia M, Stephens AC, Davis L, Flattery J, Weinberg J, Harrison RJ, Reilly MJ, Filios MS, White GE, Rosenman KD.
Am J Ind Med 2015 Nov;58(11):1138-1149
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Styrene-associated health outcomes at a windblade manufacturing plant.  
McCague AB, Cox-Ganser JM, Harney JM, Alwis KU, Blount BC, Cummings KJ, Edwards N, Kreiss K.
Am J Ind Med 2015 Nov;58(11):1150-1159
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Onset of psoriatic arthritis associated with multiple wasp stings.  
Saco TV, Glaum MC, Ledford DK, Lockey RF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 20;

Eosinophilic esophagitis as possible complication of aspirin treatment in patient with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Pelletier T, Tamayev R, Iammatteo M, Nautsch D, Hudes G, Lukin D, Jerschow E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 16;

Skin testing and drug challenge outcomes in antibiotic-allergic patients with immediate-type hypersensitivity.  
Mawhirt SL, Fonacier LS, Calixte R, vis-Lorton M, Aquino MR.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 15;
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Prevalence of food allergies in South Asia.  
Arakali SR, Green TD, Dinakar C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 15;
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Anaphylaxis induced by ingested molds.  
Moreno-Borque R, Collazo-Lorduy T, Bermudez-Martinez M, Gajate-Fernandez P, Sanchez-Lopez P, Moreno-Geada M, Plaza-Sanchez N.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 15;

Association of eosinophilic esophagitis and food pollen allergy syndrome.  
Mahdavinia M, Bishehsari F, Hayat W, Elhassan A, Tobin MC, Ditto AM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 14;

Comparison of allergens collected from furnace filters and vacuum floor dust.  
Allenbrand R, Barnes CS, Mohammed M, Gard L, Pacheco F, Kennedy K, DiDonna A, Portnoy J, Dinakar C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov 7;

Determinants of asthma morbidity in World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers.  
Xu KY, Goodman E, Goswami R, Crane M, Crowley L, Busse P, Katz CL, Markowitz S, de la Hoz RE, Jordan HT, Skloot G, Wisnivesky JP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):568-570

Rye-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Garcia-Menaya JM, Chiarella GM, Cordobes-Duran C, Mahecha AC, Bobadilla-Gonzalez P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):566-568

Allergic contact conjunctivitis and cross-reaction between phenylephrine and epinephrine due to phenylephrine eye drops.  
Gutierrez FD, Martinez RV, Lasa Luaces EM, Fernandez AF, ndres Garcia JA, Varo FM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):564-565

Analysis of 10 environmental allergen components of the American cockroach in Taiwan.  
Lee MF, Chen YH, Chiang CH, Lin SJ, Song PP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):535-541
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Urtica dioica pollen allergy: Clinical, biological, and allergomics analysis.  
Tiotiu A, Brazdova A, Longe C, Gallet P, Morisset M, Leduc V, Hilger C, Broussard C, Couderc R, Sutra JP, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):527-534
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Contribution of Leptosphaeria species ascospores to autumn asthma in areas of oilseed rape production.  
Jedryczka M, Sadys M, Gilski M, Grinn-Gofron A, Kaczmarek J, Strzelczak A, Kennedy R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):495-501
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Food allergies in the elderly: Collecting the evidence.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Jensen SA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):472-475

The custom clearance of pro- and prebiotics in allergy prevention.  
Fiocchi A, Fierro V, La MF, Dahdah LA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):465-467

What is new in food allergy diagnostics? A practice-based approach.  
Logsdon S, Assa'ad A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):462-464

Not every seafood 'allergy' is allergy!.  
Bahna SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):458-461

The platelet-activating factor pathway in food allergy and anaphylaxis.  
Vadas P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):455-457

Non-IgE-mediated food allergy syndromes.  
Ruffner MA, Spergel JM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):452-454

Updating knowledge about food allergy: critical needs for the practicing clinician.  
Assa'ad AH, Bahna S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):451

Isotretinoin treatment in a patient with known peanut allergy and positive IgE test results for soybean.  
varez-Arango S, Hou A, Lowes MA, Jerschow E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):558-559

Coping and posttraumatic stress symptoms in children with food allergies.  
Weiss D, Marsac ML.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):561-562

Diets for diagnosis and management of food allergy: The role of the dietitian in eosinophilic esophagitis in adults and children.  
Venter C, Fleischer DM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Nov;117(5):468-471

Immediate systemic allergic reaction in an infant to fish allergen ingested through breast milk.  
Arima T, Campos-Alberto E, Funakoshi H, Inoue Y, Tomiita M, Kohno Y, Shimojo N.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Oct;6(4):257-259
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The ingestion of cow's milk formula in the first 3 months of life prevents the development of cow's milk allergy.  
Sakihara T, Sugiura S, Ito K.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Oct;6(4):207-212
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A novel IgE-binding epitope of cat major allergen, Fel d 1.  
Tasaniyananda N, Tungtrongchitr A, Seesuay W, Sakolvaree Y, Indrawattana N, Chaicumpa W, Sookrung N.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2016 Feb 12;470(3):593-598
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Evaluation of a novel automated allergy microarray platform compared with three other allergy test methods.  
Williams P, Onell A, Baldracchini F, Hui V, Jolles S, El-Shanawany T.
Clin Exp Immunol 2016 Apr;184(1):1-10
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Diagnosing occupational asthma.  
Vandenplas O, Suojalehto H, Cullinan P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Nov 24;
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Standardization of double blind placebo controlled food challenge with soy within a multicentre trial.  
Treudler R, Franke A, Schmiedeknecht A, Ballmer-Weber BK, Worm M, Werfel T, Jappe U, Biedermann T, Schmitt J, Brehler R, Kleinheinz A, Kleine-Tebbe J, Bruning H, Rueff F, Ring J, Saloga J.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;639
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Lupin and other potentially cross-reactive allergens in peanut allergy.  
Mennini M, Dahdah L, Mazzina O, Fiocchi A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(12):84
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Childcare and school management issues in food allergy.  
Tsuang A, Wang J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(12):83
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How In vitro assays contribute to allergy diagnosis.  
Casset A, Khayath N, de Blay F.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(11):82
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Occupational respiratory allergic diseases in Healthcare Workers.  
Mazurek JM, Weissman DN.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(11):77
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Adverse drug reactions in the elderly: What dermatologists should know. [German]  
Kratzsch D, Simon JC, Treudler R.
Hautarzt 2016 Feb;67(2):125-131
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Chemosensory perception, symptoms and autonomic responses during chemical exposure in multiple chemical sensitivity.  
Andersson L, Claeson AS, Dantoft TM, Skovbjerg S, Lind N, Nordin S.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2016 Jan;89(1):79-88
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Healthy worker survivor analysis in an occupational cohort study of Dutch agricultural workers.  
Spierenburg EA, Smit LA, Heederik D, Robbe P, Hylkema MN, Wouters IM.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2015 Nov;88(8):1165-1173
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Management of hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: A retrospective experience.  
Kepil OS, Oner EF, Unal D, Buyukozturk S, Gelincik A, Dursun AB, Karakaya G, Bavbek S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Nov 12;171(1):54-60
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The Proinflammatory Potential of Nitrogen Dioxide and Its Influence on the House Dust Mite Allergen Der p 1.  
Koehler C, Paulus M, Ginzkey C, Hackenberg S, Scherzad A, Ickrath P, Hagen R, Kleinsasser N.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Nov 8;171(1):27-35
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Racial differences in food allergy phenotype and health care utilization among US Children.  
Mahdavinia M, Fox SR, Smith BM, James C, Palmisano EL, Mohamed A, Zahid Z, Assa'ad AH, Tobin MC, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 22;
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A proactive approach to penicillin allergy testing in hospitalized patients.  
Chen JR, Tarver SA, Alvarez KS, Tran T, Khan DA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 22;
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Allergy to benznidazole: cross-reactivity with other nitroimidazoles.  
Noguerado-Mellado B, Rojas-Perez-Ezquerra P, Calderon-Moreno M, Morales-Cabeza C, Tornero-Molina P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 22;

Identifying allergic drug reactions through placebo-controlled graded challenges.  
Iammatteo M, Ferastraoaru D, Koransky R, varez-Arango S, Thota N, Akenroye A, Jerschow E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 22;
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Cow's milk protein is often tolerated by children with oat-induced FPIES.  
Kapoor M, Bird JA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 11;

Guided introduction after negative double-blind placebo-controlled peanut challenges in children.  
van Erp FC, Knulst AC, Gorissen DM, Kok IL, van der Ent CK, Meijer Y.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 11;

Increase in allergic sensitization in schoolchildren: two cohorts compared 10 years apart.  
Bunne J, Moberg H, Hedman L, Andersson M, Bjerg A, Lundback B, Ronmark E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;
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Resolution of acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in children.  
Lee E, Campbell DE, Barnes EH, Mehr SS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;

Conducting an oral food challenge to peanut in an infant.  
Bird JA, Groetch M, Allen KJ, Bock SA, Leonard S, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Sicherer S, Clark A, Fleischer DM, Venter C, Vickery B, Young MC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;
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Determination of nonirritating concentrations of antibiotics for intradermal skin tests in Korean adults.  
Won HK, Yang MS, Song WJ, Kim SH, Park HW, Chang YS, Min KU, Cho SH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 9;

Diagnosing cefazolin hypersensitivity: Lessons from dual-labeling flow cytometry.  
Uyttebroek AP, Sabato V, Cop N, Decuyper II, Faber MA, Bridts CH, Mertens C, Hagendorens MM, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov;4(6):1243-1245

Diagnosing Cefazolin Hypersensitivity: Important Steps Forward, but We Haven't Reached the Goal Yet.  
Aberer W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov;4(6):1237-1238

Can NSAID-Induced Urticaria Be Treated?  
Simon RA, Woessner K, White AA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov;4(6):1213-1214

Food allergen labeling and purchasing habits in the United States and Canada.  
Marchisotto MJ, Harada L, Kamdar O, Smith BM, Waserman S, Sicherer S, Allen K, Muraro A, Taylor S, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Nov 3;
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IgG and IgG4 to 91 allergenic molecules in early childhood by route of exposure and current and future IgE sensitization: Results from the Multicentre Allergy Study birth cohort.  
Schwarz A, Panetta V, Cappella A, Hofmaier S, Hatzler L, Rohrbach A, Tsilochristou O, Bauer CP, Hoffmann U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, D'Amelio R, Wahn U, Keil T, Lau S, Matricardi PM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;138(5):1426-1433
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Allergy-and-infant-feeding guidelines in the context of resource-constrained settings.  
Levin M, Goga A, Doherty T, Coovadia H, Sanders D, Green RJ, Kling S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov 14;

Early-life Farm Exposures and Adult Asthma and Atopy in the Agricultural Lung Health Study.  
House JS, Wyss AB, Hoppin JA, Richards M, Long S, Umbach DM, Henneberger P, Beane Freeman LE, Sandler DP, Long OE, Barker CC, London SJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov 11;
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High alcohol consumption causes high IgE levels but not high risk of allergic disease.  
Lomholt FK, Nielsen SF, Nordestgaard BG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;138(5):1404-1413
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Altered metabolic profile in patients with IgE to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose following in vivo food challenge.  
Steinke JW, Pochan SL, James HR, Platts-Mills TA, Commins SP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;138(5):1465-1467

Allergic skin sensitization promotes eosinophilic esophagitis through the IL-33-basophil axis in mice.  
Venturelli N, Lexmond WS, Ohsaki A, Nurko S, Karasuyama H, Fiebiger E, Oyoshi MK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;138(5):1367-1380
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Asthma associated with the use of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana: a review of the evidence.  
Self TH, Shah S, March KL, Sands CW.
J Asthma 2016 Nov 18;0
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Decreased Level of IgE is Associated with Breast Cancer and Allergic Diseases.  
Zhang H, Guo G, Jianzhong C, Zheng Y.
Med Sci Monit 2016 Feb 22;22587-597
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The link between soda intake and asthma: science points to the high-fructose corn syrup, not the preservatives: a commentary.  
LR DeChristopher, J Uribarriand KL Tucker
Miscellaneous Nutrition & Diabetes 2016;6, e234; doi:10.1038
Abstract

The allergens of the month: from linen to cashew nut . . . [French]  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):495-496
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For a simplified reception in school catering. About the Champagne-Ardenne experience [French]  
D. Sabouraud-Leclerc, S. Brother, S. Fontaine, G. Pouessel, H. Delong, C. Pietrement
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):497-502
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Les allergènes croisants des insectes comestibles / Cross-eating insect allergens [French]  
A. Barre, E. Velazquez, A. Delplanque, S. Caze-Subra, F. Bienvenu, J. Bienvenu, H. Benoist, P. Rougé
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):522-532
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Characteristics of a group of 21 patients allergic to meat by sensitization to allergens alpha-Gal [French]  
Mr. Drouet, Mr. E. Sarre, Mr. A. Hoppe, Mr. JC Bonneau, Mr. JM Leclère, Mr. J. Sellin, Mr. C. Beauvillain, Mr. G. Rénier
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):533-538
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Gluten sensitivity not celiac disease. Where are we in 2016? [French]  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):556-561
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Allergy to flax seed: general review of an observation [French]  
C. Chatain, J.-P. Jacquier, P. Pralong, M.-T. Leccia
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):562-566
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Allergy to cashew [French]  
Q. Haumonté, E. Beaudouin, VM Nguyen, J. Picaud, H. Thomas, J. Corriger, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):567-572
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What's new in pediatric allergology in 2015? General epidemiology, diagnosis (early), treatment, anaphylaxis, food allergy, drug, excipients and contaminants, and insect venoms and saliva (A review of the international literature 2015) [French]  
C. Ponvert
Rev Fr Allergol 2016;56(7-8):579-602
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Structural and functional characterization of the major allergen Amb a 11 from Short Ragweed pollen.  
Groeme R, Airouche S, Kopecny D, Jaekel J, Savko M, Berjont N, Bussieres L, Le MM, Jagic F, Zieglmayer P, Baron-Bodo V, Bordas-Le F, Mascarell L, Briozzo P, Moingeon P.
J Biol Chem 2016 Jun 17;291(25):13076-13087
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