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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Allergen microarrays: a novel tool for high-resolution IgE profiling in adults with atopic dermatitis.
Read Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization.
Read Anaphylaxis to lipid transfer protein from sunflower seeds.
Read IgE-mediated facilitated antigen presentation underlies higher immune responses in peanut allergy.
Read Food allergen protein families and their structural characteristics and application in component-resolved diagnosis: new data from the EuroPrevall project.
Read Molecular aspects of milk allergens and their role in clinical events.
Read Season of birth and food allergy in children.
Read Correlation of oral allergy syndrome due to plant-derived foods with pollen sensitization in Japan.
Read Mushroom intolerance: a novel diet-gene interaction in Crohn's disease.
Read Aspergillus fumigatus regulates mite allergen-pulsed dendritic cells in the development of asthma.
Read Recombinant phospholipase A1 (Ves v 1) from yellow jacket venom for improved diagnosis of hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.
Read Seafood workers and respiratory disease: an update.
Read Wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis
Read Genetic polymorphisms of Adrb2 and Il10 may be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to pancreatic extracts.
Read Differences among Pollen-Allergic Patients with and without Plant Food Allergy.
Read ELISA for the determination of parvalbumins from various fish species in food grade fish gelatins and isinglass with PARV-19 anti-parvalbumin antibodies.
Read Antigenicity and viability of Anisakis larvae infesting hake heated at different time-temperatures.
Read Monosensitivity to pangasius and tilapia caused by allergens other than parvalbumin.
Read Skin prick test-based study of the prevalence and clinical impact of hypersensitivity to pollen polcalcin and profilin.
Read Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.
Read Cysteine proteinase inhibitor Act d 4 - contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.
Read Characterization of plant food allergens: an overview on physicochemical and immunological techniques.
Read Lupine, a source of new as well as hidden food allergens.
Read Impact of food processing on the structural and allergenic properties of food allergens.
Read Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.
Read Identification of Amaranthus palmeri (Careless weed) pollen allergens

Abstracts shared in April 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read A novel 20 kDa shrimp allergen showing cross-reactivity to house dust mites.
Read Tropomyosin or not tropomyosin, what is the relevant allergen in house dust mite and snail cross allergies?
Read Maize food allergy: lipid-transfer proteins, endochitinases, and alpha-zein precursor
Read A new lipid transfer protein homolog identified as an IgE-binding antigen from Japanese cedar pollen.
Read Sensitization to lupine flour: is it clinically relevant?
Read Shellfish allergy.
Read Cuc m 2, the major melon allergen, and their role in cross-reactivity with pollen profilins.
Read Immunoglobulin E sensitization to Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants: Epidemiological study of clinical relevance and role of alcohol consumption.
Read The major allergen of green bean is a non-specific lipid transfer protein.
Read Peanut varieties with reduced Ara h 1 content indicating no reduced allergenicity.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen microarrays: a novel tool for high-resolution IgE profiling in adults with atopic dermatitis.
This study evaluatee allergen microarrays in the diagnostic workup of adults with atopic dermatitis (AD) and compared this with a conventional method of specific IgE (sIgE) measurement. In sera of 40 atopic adults, sIgE levels detected by microarray-analysis were correlated with the results of an established fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). In a further 20 patients with AD, individual sIgE recognition patterns were established by microarray analysis and evaluated with regard to clinical features of AD. AD patients revealed a mean of 21 sensitizations per individual (range 1-46) and 65% displayed sIgE against cross-allergens, particularly pathogenesis related proteins such as the major allergen of birch pollen (Bet v 1), alder pollen (Aln g 1), apple (Mal d 1) or celery (Api g 1). The authors conclude that the study provides evidence that allergen microarrays represent a promising tool for component-resolved diagnosis in patients with AD, but that further large-scale studies in unselected patient populations are needed before the introduction of allergen microarrays into daily clinical practice.

Allergen microarrays: a novel tool for high-resolution IgE profiling in adults with atopic dermatitis.  
Ott H, Folster-Holst R, Merk HF, Baron JM.
Eur J Dermatol 2010 Jan;20(1):54-61

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization.
This study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with contact sensitization and nickel sensitization. A random sample of adults (n=3460) from the general population of Copenhagen was invited to participate in a general health examination including patch-testing. Alcohol consumption was not associated with nickel sensitization, whereas a significant trend (p<0.05) was identified between smoking status and nickel sensitization in an adjusted model; i.e. nickel sensitization was higher among both previous smokers, current light smokers and current heavy smokers compared with never smokers.

Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization.  
Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Menne T, Nielsen NH, Linneberg A.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010;90(1):27-33

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to lipid transfer protein from sunflower seeds.
Anaphylaxis to lipid transfer protein from sunflower seeds. A 22-year-old female, with histories of atopic dermatitis and Japanese cedar pollinosis, ate five pieces of sunflower seed chocolates made in Korea. Five minutes later, she experienced sudden nausea and dyspnea, followed by development of wheals all over her body. Wheezing was heard in the region of her larynx. Her bulbar conjunctiva was hyperemic. She was successfully treated with injections of epinephrine and corticosteroids. Serum specific IgE for sunflower seed was high (35.1 UA/ml). Her serum specific IgE for Japanese cedar pollen was 27.2 IU/ml. No serum specific IgE for mugwort, birch, ragweed, dandelion, latex, chocolate, cacao, peanuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, and gelatin was seen. Several IgE-binding protein bands on the immunoblot assay using the extract from sunflower seeds, (13, 14, and 37 kDa). Inhibition immunoblot assay using the extract from sunflower seeds, resulted in the IgE-binding signal of one band (13 kDa) disappearing completely. This protein closely matched lipid transfer protein (LTP) from sunflower seeds.

Anaphylaxis to lipid transfer protein from sunflower seeds.  
Yagami A.
Allergy 2010;65(10):1340-1341

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE-mediated facilitated antigen presentation underlies higher immune responses in peanut allergy.
This study explored the immunological mechanisms that underlie peanut allergy and tolerance, comparing peanut-specific responses of peanut-allergic (PA) and nonallergic (NA) individuals.

Peanut-specific PBMC proliferation was higher and peaks earlier in PA than in NA donors. Both PA and NA had memory responses to peanut, but the frequency of peanut-specific T cells was higher in PA than in NA. These results identify FAP as a mechanism that underlies higher responses to peanut in PA. In these individuals, high levels of peanut-specific IgE could furthermore maintain long-term allergic T-cell responses. The authors raise the question whether therapies targeting IgE such as anti-IgE antibodies may be used to suppress these T-cell responses

IgE-mediated facilitated antigen presentation underlies higher immune responses in peanut allergy.  
Turcanu V, Stephens AC, Chan SM, Rance F, Lack G.
Allergy 2010 Apr 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergen protein families and their structural characteristics and application in component-resolved diagnosis: new data from the EuroPrevall project.
"This review is dedicated to summarizing current knowledge about the most important food allergen protein families and to presenting data from the EuroPrevall allergen library, a proof-of-concept collection of highly purified, characterized and authenticated food allergens from animal and plant food sources to facilitate improved diagnosis of food allergies."

Food allergen protein families and their structural characteristics and application in component-resolved diagnosis: new data from the EuroPrevall project.  
Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Mills EN.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):25-35

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular aspects of milk allergens and their role in clinical events.
"Milk allergy is the most frequent food allergy in childhood. Even though cases of newly developed milk allergy in adulthood are known, this allergy is less frequent in adults since it is normally outgrown by children during the first years of life. One of the reasons why allergy to cow's milk shows its highest prevalence in children is its early introduction into the diets of babies when breast feeding is not possible. The major allergens are caseins and beta-lactoglobulin, but allergies to other minor proteins (immunoglobulins, bovine serum albumin) have also been reported. Milk allergenicity can be reduced by various treatments (mainly hydrolysis), meaning that formulas based on cow's milk can often be safely fed to children allergic to milk proteins. Cross-reactivity has been described between different mammalian milks and between milk and meat or animal dander. Cross-contamination can result from inadequate cleaning of industrial equipment and constitutes a hidden danger for allergic subjects who unknowingly ingest milk proteins."

Molecular aspects of milk allergens and their role in clinical events.  
Restani P, Ballabio C, Di LC, Tripodi S, Fiocchi A.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):47-56

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Season of birth and food allergy in children.
Food allergy is more common in Boston children born in the fall and winter seasons. The authors propose that these findings are mediated by seasonal differences in UV-B exposure, and that these results add support to the hypothesis that seasonal fluctuations in sunlight and perhaps vitamin D may be involved in the pathogenesis of food allergy

Season of birth and food allergy in children.  
Vassallo MF, Banerji A, Rudders SA, Clark S, Mullins RJ, Camargo CA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Apr;104(4):307-313

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Correlation of oral allergy syndrome due to plant-derived foods with pollen sensitization in Japan.
The clinical features of patients with oral allergy syndrome (OAS) due to plant-derived foods related to pollen allergy have been rarely reported in Japan. This study evaluated the characteristics of OAS Japan. Specific IgE antibodies against 5 pollens in 622 outpatients (277 males and 345 females; mean age, 37 years) with atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, and food allergy during a 2-year period was measured. Eighteen of the 436 patients (4.1%) sensitized to pollens were diagnosed as having OAS. Rates of specific IgE antibody-positive responses against Japanese cedar, ragweed, orchard grass, mugwort, and alder pollen were 69.8%, 35.3%, 29.1%, 24.1%, and 19.6%, respectively. The prevalence of OAS showed a significant positive correlation with sensitization to alder. The most frequent causative foods were found to be apple, peach, and melon. The prevalence of OAS due to apple showed a significant positive correlation with sensitization to alder pollen, due to peach showed a significant positive correlation with sensitization to alder and orchard grass pollen, and due to melon showed a significant positive correlation with sensitization to alder, orchard grass, and ragweed pollen. Therefore sensitization to pollens from species in the Betulaceae family is most strongly implicated in causing OAS in Japan

Correlation of oral allergy syndrome due to plant-derived foods with pollen sensitization in Japan.  
Maeda N, Inomata N, Morita A, Kirino M, Ikezawa Z.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):205-210

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mushroom intolerance: a novel diet-gene interaction in Crohn's disease.
More New Zealand Crohn's disease (CD) cases report intolerance to maize and mushrooms than those who report beneficial effects or no differences. The OCTN1 gene encodes a transporter for ergothionine, a fungal metabolite at high levels in mushrooms but not widely common in other dietary items. An inability to tolerate mushrooms showed statistically significant associations with the variant OCTN1 genotype. That is, among those individuals reporting adverse effects from mushrooms, there was a higher frequency of the variant T-allele when compared with the general population, or with CD patients overall.

Mushroom intolerance: a novel diet-gene interaction in Crohn's disease.  
Petermann I, Triggs CM, Huebner C, Han DY, Gearry RB, Barclay ML, Demmers PS, McCulloch A, Ferguson LR.
Br J Nutr 2009 Aug;102(4):506-508

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Aspergillus fumigatus regulates mite allergen-pulsed dendritic cells in the development of asthma.
Results of this study suggests that concurrent exposure to pathogens such as fungi and mite allergens has profound influences on the subsequent allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

Aspergillus fumigatus regulates mite allergen-pulsed dendritic cells in the development of asthma.  
Fukahori S, Matsuse H, Tsuchida T, Kawano T, Tomari S, Fukushima C, Kohno S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant phospholipase A1 (Ves v 1) from yellow jacket venom for improved diagnosis of hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.
Ves v 1 and Ves v 5 was expressed in insect cells yielded soluble proteins that were purified. Both major allergens Ves v 1 and Ves v 5 could be produced in insect cells in secreted soluble form. Assessment of IgE reactivity of sera of yellow jacket venom (YJV)-sensitized and double-sensitized patients demonstrated the relevance of Ves v 1 in hymenoptera venom allergy. In contrast to the use of singular molecules the combined use of both molecules enabled a reliable assignment of sensitisation to YJV for more than 90% of double-sensitised patients.

Conclusions: The recombinant availability of Ves v 1 from yellow jacket venom will contribute to a more detailed understanding of the molecular and allergological mechanisms of insect venoms and may provide a valuable tool for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in hymenoptera venom allergy

Recombinant phospholipase A1 (Ves v 1) from yellow jacket venom for improved diagnosis of hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.  
Seismann H, Blank S, Cifuentes L, Braren I, Bredehorst R, Grunwald T, Ollert M, Spillner E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2010 Apr 1;8(1):7

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Seafood workers and respiratory disease: an update.
"Purpose of Review: This review focuses on seafood workers engaged in harvesting, processing and food preparation. These groups are increasingly at risk of developing occupational allergy and respiratory disease as a result of seafood handling and processing activities. This review provides an update of a previous review conducted a decade ago.

Recent Findings: Exposure characterization studies have demonstrated that aerosolization of seafood (muscle, visceral organs, skin/mucin) during canning and fishmeal operations result in highly variable levels of airborne particulate (0.001-11.293 mg/m3) and allergens (0.001-75.748 ug/m3). Occupational asthma is more commonly associated with shellfish (4-36%) than with bony fish (2-8%). Other seafood-associated biological (Anisakis) and chemical agents (protease enzymes, toxins and preservatives) have also been implicated. Atopy, smoking and level of exposure to allergens are significant risk factors for sensitization and the development of occupational asthma. Molecular studies of the allergens suggest that aside from tropomyosin and parvalbumin, other as yet uncharacterized allergens are important.

Summary: Future research needs to focus on detailed characterization of allergens in order to standardize exposure assessment techniques, which are key to assessing the impact of interventions. The clinical relevance of agents such as serine proteases and endotoxins in causing asthma through nonallergic mechanisms needs further epidemiological investigation."

Seafood workers and respiratory disease: an update.  
Jeebhay MF, Cartier A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr;10(2):104-113

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis
"Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a rare IgE-dependent anaphylaxis to wheat, which occurs in sensitized people after ingestion of wheat followed by physical exercise. The major allergen associated with WDEIA is the wheat protein Omega (omega)-5-Gliadin (Tri a 19). We present three cases of WDEIA, demonstrating that this disease might be more frequent than anticipated and that neither prick test nor specific IgE to allergen extracts but rather detection of specific IgE against the recombinant protein Tri a 19 leads to diagnosis."

Wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis. [German]  
Brans R, Ott H, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2009 Dec;60(12):956-960

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Genetic polymorphisms of Adrb2 and Il10 may be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to pancreatic extracts.
Pancreatic extracts may induce IgE-mediated respiratory allergy in medical personnel. A case-control study was performed on 153 subjects routinely exposed to digestive powder and on 123 nonexposed controls workingl. Serum specific IgE to digestive powder was significantly higher in the 41 (26.8%) exposed personnel with work-related respiratory symptoms than in controls (24.4 vs. 5.4%). Thirty-nine (25.5%) of the 153 exposed personnel were found to have an allergy to digestive powder, as determined by a positive skin prick test and/or a high serum specific IgE level to digestive powder. The ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with the development of an allergy to digestive powder in exposed medical personnel.

Genetic polymorphisms of Adrb2 and Il10 may be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to digestive powders in exposed medical personnel.  
Ye YM, Lee HY, Kim SH, Kim SH, Kim SH, Park HS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 23;153(2):193-200

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Differences among Pollen-Allergic Patients with and without Plant Food Allergy.
Many pollen-allergic patients develop allergy to plant foods, attributed to cross-reactivity between food and pollen allergens. This study analyzed the differences among pollen-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Eight hundred and six patients were recruited from 8 different hospitals. Each clinical research group included 100 patients (50 plant food-allergic patients and 50 pollen-allergic patients). A panel of 28 purified allergens from pollens and/or plant foods was used to quantify specific IgE (ADVIA-Centaur(R) platform). Six hundred and sixty eight patients (83%) of the 806 evaluated had pollen allergy: 396 patients with pollen allergy alone and 272 patients with associated food and pollen allergies. A comparison of both groups showed a statistically significant increase in the food and pollen allergy subgroup in frequency of: (1) asthma (47 vs. 59%; p < 0.001); (2) positive skin test results to several pollens: Plantago,Platanus,Artemisia,Betula,Parietaria and Salsola (p < 0.001); (3) sensitization to purified allergens: Pru p 3, profilin, Pla a 1 - Pla a 2, Sal k 1, PR-10 proteins and Len c 1.

Differences among Pollen-Allergic Patients with and without Plant Food Allergy.  
Cuesta-Herranz J, Barber D, Blanco C, Cistero-Bahima A, Crespo JF, Fernandez-Rivas M, Fernandez-Sanchez J, Florido JF, Ibanez MD, Rodriguez R, Salcedo G, Garcia BE, Lombardero M, Quiralte .
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 23;153(2):182-192

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
ELISA for the determination of parvalbumins from various fish species in food grade fish gelatins and isinglass with PARV-19 anti-parvalbumin antibodies.
The aim of this study was the isolation of the various parvalbumins by the application of gel chromatography and dialysis and the development and validation of a competitive indirect ELISA for the determination of parvalbumins from various fish species. This ELISA method was applied to several fish gelatins and isinglass samples used in food production. The competitive ELISA was capable of detecting all tested parvalbumins within a range of 0.1-0.5 mg/L. No parvalbumin was detected in any of the investigated fish gelatins or in a fish skin used as raw material for fish gelatin production. Contrarily, isinglass was found to contain parvalbumin amounts of up to 414.7 +/- 30.6 mg/kg

Competitive indirect ELISA for the determination of parvalbumins from various fish species in food grade fish gelatins and isinglass with PARV-19 anti-parvalbumin antibodies.  
Weber P, Steinhart H, Paschke A.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Dec 9;57(23):11328-11334

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Antigenicity and viability of Anisakis larvae infesting hake heated at different time-temperatures.
Heat treatments (40 to 94 degrees Celsius, 30 s to 60 min) were applied to different batches of Anisakis simplex L3 larvae isolated from hake ovaries and viscera to study the effect of heat on the viability of the larvae and on A. simplex antigenic proteins. Heating at 60 degrees Celsius for 10 min was considered unsafe, as differences in viability between batches were found, with some larvae presenting spontaneous movements in one batch. At higher temperatures (> or = 70 degrees Celsius for > or = 1 min), no movement of the larvae was observed. Antigenic protein Ani s 4 and A. simplex crude antigens were detected in the larvae heated at 94 + or - 1 degrees Celsius for 3 min. This indicates that allergic symptoms could be provoked in previously sensitized consumers, even if the larvae were killed by heat treatment.

Antigenicity and viability of Anisakis larvae infesting hake heated at different time-temperature conditions.  
Vidacek S, de las HC, Solas MT, Mendizabal A, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Tejada M.
J Food Prot 2010 Jan;73(1):62-68

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Monosensitivity to pangasius and tilapia caused by allergens other than parvalbumin.
The aim of this study was to investigate a patient with oral allergy syndrome to pangasius and Nile tilapia but tolerance of other fish and seafood. All evidence supported an IgE-mediated allergy, confirmed by the detection of specific IgE to 18-kDa and 45-kDa proteins in immunoblot analysis. Notably, the patient was not sensitized to parvalbumin as shown by using purified allergens. Therefore cross-reactivity between fish species can result from sensitization to allergens other than parvalbumin. This case also emphasizes the applications of flow cytometry-assisted analysis in the diagnosis of food allergy.

Monosensitivity to pangasius and tilapia caused by allergens other than parvalbumin.  
Ebo DG, Kuehn A, Bridts CH, Hilger C, Hentges F, Stevens WJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):84-88

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick test-based study of the prevalence and clinical impact of hypersensitivity to pollen polcalcin and profilin.
Calcium-binding proteins (polcalcins) and profilin are cross-reacting panallergens that sensitize a minority of pollen-allergic patients. Their clinical relevance remains controversial. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical relevance of hypersensitivity to polcalcin and profilin detected by skin prick test (SPT) in 200 pollen-allergic adults who underwent SPT with 9 pollens present in the geographical area of the study. Hypersensitivity to panallergens was detected by SPT with date palm polcalcin and profilin. Sixteen (8%) patients reacted to date palm polcalcin; 7/7 (100%) corecognized the grass polcalcin Phl p 7 in vitro. Clinically, only 4 (25%) had symptoms in all 3 seasonal periods. Forty (20%) patients reacted to profilin; only 32 (80%) reacted to cypress, and 22 (55%) to pellitory. Only 4 (10%) patients had symptoms during all 3 seasonal periods. Six patients (3%) were cosensitized to both polcalcin and profilin. The authors conclude that the clinical relevance of hypersensitivity to pollen panallergens is often limited; many allergic patients have symptoms only during the central period, suggesting primary grass sensitization. Profilin-allergic patients often do not corecognize pellitory and cypress pollen. In vivo component-resolved diagnosis of seasonal respiratory allergies is a promising approach that might lead to cost reduction and a faster definition of pollen-allergic cases.

Preliminary results of a skin prick test-based study of the prevalence and clinical impact of hypersensitivity to pollen panallergens (polcalcin and profilin).  
Asero R, Jimeno L, Barber D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):35-38

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.
The results of this study indicates that some heat treatments reduce IgE binding to lentil and chickpea, the most important being harsh autoclaving. However, several extremely resistant immunoreactive proteins still remained in these legumes even after this extreme treatment.

Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.  
Cuadrado C, Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Varela A, Guillamon E, Muzquiz M, Crespo JF, Rodriguez J, Burbano C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Nov;53(11):1462-1468

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cysteine proteinase inhibitor Act d 4 - contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.
Evaluation of the allergenic properties of Act d 4, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit was performed. A molecular mass of 10902.5 - 11055.2 Da was derived. Positive skin prick reactivity was induced in three kiwifruit allergic patients. Upregulation of CD63 and CD203c molecules in the basophile activation assay was shown. The presence of conformational IgE epitopes on the Act d 4 molecule was inferred. Therefore as an activator of effector cells in type I hypersensitivity Act d 4 is a functional allergen contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.

Cysteine proteinase inhibitor Act d 4 is a functional allergen contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.  
Popovic MM, Milovanovic M, Burazer L, Vuckovic O, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Knulst AC, Lindner B, Petersen A, Jankov R, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Nov 2;54(3):373-380

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of plant food allergens: an overview on physicochemical and immunological techniques.
"Allergy to plant-derived foods is a highly complex disorder with clinical manifestations ranging from mild oral, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous symptoms to life-threatening systemic conditions. This heterogeneity in clinical manifestations has been attributed to different properties of allergenic molecules. Based on this fact, symptom elicitors were grouped into class I and pollinosis-associated class II food allergens, but clear distinction is rather ambiguous. Moreover, mechanisms underlying food sensitization are not fully understood yet, and food allergy management most often relies on patient's compliance to avoid suspected foods. Therefore, recent efforts aim at the investigation of plant food allergies at the molecular level. This review provides an overview on currently available techniques for allergen characterization and discusses their application for investigation of plant food allergens. Data obtained by an array of physicochemical analyses, such as allergen structure, integrity, aggregation, and stability, need to be linked to results from immunological methods at the level of IgE and T-cell reactivity. Such knowledge allows the development of computational algorithms to predict allergenicity of novel foods being introduced by biotechnological industry. Furthermore, molecular characterization is an indispensable tool for molecule-based diagnosis and future development of safer patient-tailored specific immunotherapy in plant food allergy."

Characterization of plant food allergens: an overview on physicochemical and immunological techniques.  
Harrer A, Egger M, Gadermaier G, Erler A, Hauser M, Ferreira F, Himly M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jan;54(1):93-112

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lupine, a source of new as well as hidden food allergens.
This review summarizes current knowledge about lupine allergy, potential sensitization routes, cross-reactions between lupine and other legumes, and the respective IgE-binding proteins. In 1994, the first case of an immediate-type allergy after ingestion of lupine flour-containing pasta was reported. Since then, the number of published incidents following ingestion or inhalation of lupine flour is rising. So far, beta-conglutin has been designated as the allergen (Lup an 1). Initially, publications focussed on the fact that peanut-allergic patients were at risk to develop anaphylaxis to lupine due to cross-reactivity between peanut and lupine. At present, however, the ratio between cases of pre-existing legume allergy (mostly peanut allergy) to de novo sensitization to lupine seed is nearly 1:1.

Lupine, a source of new as well as hidden food allergens.  
Jappe U, Vieths S.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jan;54(1):113-126

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impact of food processing on the structural and allergenic properties of food allergens.
This article reviews recent studies that address one of the major unanswered questions in food allergy research: what attributes of food or food proteins contribute to or enhance food allergenicity?

Impact of food processing on the structural and allergenic properties of food allergens.  
Mills EN, Sancho AI, Rigby NM, Jenkins JA, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):963-969

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.
The aim of this was to study generate the first epidemiological data regarding the prevalence of hymenoptera allergy among school children in Ireland. From 110 schools, 4112 questionnaires were returned. A total of 1544 (37.5%) children had been stung in their lifetime. Among the total, 5.8% of children stung experienced a large local reaction, 3.4% had a mild (cutaneous) systemic reaction (MSR) and 0.8% experienced a moderate/severe systemic reaction (SSR); these figures respectively represent 2.2%, 1.3% and 0.2% of the total study group. Rural dwellers and asthma sufferers were more likely to experience an SSR. Hymenoptera stings are more common in rural than urban dwelling Irish children. Asthma imparted a greater risk of SSR in this study population. Severe reactions are unusual overall, occurring in <1% of those stung, a lower prevalence than in Israeli teenagers but in keeping with other European reports relating to young children.

Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.  
Jennings A, Duggan E, Perry IJ, Hourihane JO.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 14;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of Amaranthus palmeri (Careless weed) pollen allergens
Amaranthus palmed pollen is an important allergenic agent in Mexico. A high proportion of subjects allergic to pollen grains are allergic to this species. The objective of this study was to identify proteins that are recognized preferentially by patients allergic to A. palmeri that could be considered as its allergens. Four proteins with molecular weights of 17.9, 20.1, 26.6 and 66.5 kDa, which can be proposed as allergens, were found.

[Identification of Amaranthus palmeri pollen allergens comparing recognizing pattern between allergic and non-allergic].  
Rosas AA, Montes MJ, Garcia LE.
Rev Alerg Mex 2008 Nov;55(6):215-221

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Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Allergic contact dermatitis to inhalation corticosteroids.  
Baeck M, Pilette C, Drieghe J, Goossens A.
Eur J Dermatol 2010 Jan;20(1):102-108
Click to view abstract

Allergen microarrays: a novel tool for high-resolution IgE profiling in adults with atopic dermatitis.  
Ott H, Folster-Holst R, Merk HF, Baron JM.
Eur J Dermatol 2010 Jan;20(1):54-61
Click to view abstract

Body dysmorphic disorder in a hairdresser: contact dermatitis due to voluntary exposure to occupationally relevant allergens.  
Matterne U, Shab A, Weisshaar E.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010;90(1):97-98

Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization.  
Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Menne T, Nielsen NH, Linneberg A.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010;90(1):27-33
Click to view abstract

Detection of a novel 20 kDa shrimp allergen showing cross-reactivity to house dust mites.  
Villalta D, Tonutti E, Visentini D, Bizzaro N, Roncarolo D, Amato S, Mistrello G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;42(1):20-24

Specific oral tolerance induction for food. A systematic review.  
Calvani M, Giorgio V, Miceli SS.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;42(1):11-19

Tropomyosin or not tropomyosin, what is the relevant allergen in house dust mite and snail cross allergies?  
Bessot JC, Metz-Favre C, Rame JM, de BF, Pauli G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;42(1):3-10

Expression of the recombinant major allergen of Salsola kali pollen (sal k 1) and comparison with its low-immunoglobulin e-binding mutant.  
Assarehzadegan MA, Sankian M, Jabbari F, Tehrani M, Varasteh A.
Allergol Int 2010 Apr 24;59(2):
Click to view abstract

Detection of indoor and outdoor avian antigen in management of bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis.  
Kuramochi J, Inase N, Takayama K, Miyazaki Y, Yoshizawa Y.
Allergol Int 2010 Apr 24;59(2):
Click to view abstract

Clinical reactivity to raw peanut correlates with IgE binding to conformational epitopes of Ara h 1: a Case Report.  
Ditto AM, Neilsen CV, Neerukonda S, Shreffler WG, Bryce PJ.
Allergy 2010 Apr 12;

Anaphylaxis to lipid transfer protein from sunflower seeds.  
Yagami A.
Allergy 2010;65(10):1340-1341

IgE-mediated facilitated antigen presentation underlies higher immune responses in peanut allergy.  
Turcanu V, Stephens AC, Chan SM, Rance F, Lack G.
Allergy 2010 Apr 7;
Click to view abstract

Conjunctival effects of a selective nasal pollen provocation.  
Callebaut I, Spielberg L, Hox V, Bobic S, Jorissen M, Stalmans I, Scadding G, Ceuppens JL, Hellings PW.
Allergy 2010 Apr 23;

Cross-reactivity between coconut and lentil related to a 7S globulin and an 11S globulin.  
Manso L, Pastor C, Perez-Gordo M, Cases B, Sastre J, Cuesta-Herranz J.
Allergy 2010 Apr 23;

Immunochemical characterisation of structure and allergenicity of peanut 2S albumins using different formats of immunoassays.  
Bernard H, Drumare MF, Guillon B, Paty E, Scheinmann P, Wal JM.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):139-146

Immunomodulation by food: promising concept for mitigating allergic disease?  
Wichers H.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):37-45

Commercialized rapid immunoanalytical tests for determination of allergenic food proteins: an overview.  
Schubert-Ullrich P, Rudolf J, Ansari P, Galler B, Fuhrer M, Molinelli A, Baumgartner S.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):69-81

Should genetically modified foods be abandoned on the basis of allergenicity?  
Bachas-Daunert S, Deo SK.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2008 Oct;392(3):341-346

Maize food allergy: lipid-transfer proteins, endochitinases, and alpha-zein precursor are relevant maize allergens in double-blind placebo-controlled maize-challenge-positive patients.  
Pastorello EA, Farioli L, Pravettoni V, Scibilia J, Conti A, Fortunato D, Borgonovo L, Bonomi S, Primavesi L, Ballmer-Weber B.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):93-102.
Abstract

Allergen immunoassays--considerations for use of naturally incurred standards.  
Taylor SL, Nordlee JA, Niemann LM, Lambrecht DM.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):83-92

Food allergen protein families and their structural characteristics and application in component-resolved diagnosis: new data from the EuroPrevall project.  
Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Mills EN.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):25-35

Allergens in foods.  
Paschke A, Ulberth F.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):15-16

Molecular aspects of milk allergens and their role in clinical events.  
Restani P, Ballabio C, Di LC, Tripodi S, Fiocchi A.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):47-56

Quantitative methods for food allergens: a review.  
Kirsch S, Fourdrilis S, Dobson R, Scippo ML, Maghuin-Rogister G, De PE.
Anal Bioanal Chem 2009 Sep;395(1):57-67

Pristinamycin-induced leucocytoclastic vasculitis. [French]  
Lipowicz S, Saada D, Sigal M, Wahn AR, Grossin M.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Jan;137(1):55-57

Three cases of rice-induced occupational asthma.  
Kim JH, Choi GS, Kim JE, Ye YM, Park HS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Apr;104(4):353-354

Combined cetirizine-montelukast preventive treatment for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Peroni DG, Piacentini GL, Piazza M, Cametti E, Boner AL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):272-273

Occupational rhinitis and asthma due to cabreuva wood dust.  
Pala G, Pignatti P, Perfetti L, Avanzini MA, Calcagno G, Preziosi D, Moscato G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):268-269

On the cover. Sorghastrum.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Apr;104(4):A3

Season of birth and food allergy in children.  
Vassallo MF, Banerji A, Rudders SA, Clark S, Mullins RJ, Camargo CA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Apr;104(4):307-313
Click to view abstract

Factors that affect the allergic rhinitis response to ragweed allergen exposure.  
Ellis AK, Ratz JD, Day AG, Day JH.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Apr;104(4):293-298
Click to view abstract

Pollen aeroallergens in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area: a 10-year volumetric survey (1998-2007).  
Kosisky SE, Marks MS, Nelson MR.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):223-235
Click to view abstract

Possible role of climate changes in variations in pollen seasons and allergic sensitizations during 27 years.  
Ariano R, Canonica GW, Passalacqua G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):215-222
Click to view abstract

Correlation of oral allergy syndrome due to plant-derived foods with pollen sensitization in Japan.  
Maeda N, Inomata N, Morita A, Kirino M, Ikezawa Z.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):205-210
Click to view abstract

On the cover. Myrmecia.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Mar;104(3):A4

Polcalcin divalent ion-binding behavior and thermal stability: comparison of Bet v 4, Bra n 1, and Bra n 2 to Phl p 7.  
Henzl MT, Davis ME, Tan A.
Biochemistry 2010 Mar 16;49(10):2256-2268
Click to view abstract

A new lipid transfer protein homolog identified as an IgE-binding antigen from Japanese cedar pollen.  
Ibrahim AR, Kawamoto S, Nishimura M, Pak S, Aki T, Diaz-Perales A, Salcedo G, Asturias JA, Hayashi T, Ono K.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2010 Mar 23;74(3):504-9.
Abstract

Mushroom intolerance: a novel diet-gene interaction in Crohn's disease.  
Petermann I, Triggs CM, Huebner C, Han DY, Gearry RB, Barclay ML, Demmers PS, McCulloch A, Ferguson LR.
Br J Nutr 2009 Aug;102(4):506-508

Safety of barley starch syrup in patients with allergy to cereals.  
Nermes M, Karvonen H, Sarkkinen E, Isolauri E.
Br J Nutr 2009 Jan;101(2):165-168

10-Minute consultation: Pollen food syndrome in a teenage student.  
Angier E, Sheikh A.
BMJ 2010;340b3405

Sensitization to lupine flour: is it clinically relevant?  
de Jong NW, van Maaren MS, Vlieg-Boersta BJ, Dubois AE, de GH, Gerth van WR.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr 13;
Click to view abstract

Aspergillus fumigatus regulates mite allergen-pulsed dendritic cells in the development of asthma.  
Fukahori S, Matsuse H, Tsuchida T, Kawano T, Tomari S, Fukushima C, Kohno S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells switches the whey-allergic response from immunoglobulin E- to immunoglobulin free light chain-dependent.  
van Esch BC, Schouten B, Blokhuis BR, Hofman GA, Boon L, Garssen J, Knippels LM, Willemsen LE, Redegeld FA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

Shellfish allergy.  
Lopata AL, O'Hehir RE, Lehrer SB.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

Characterization of IgE epitopes of Cuc m 2, the major melon allergen, and their role in cross-reactivity with pollen profilins.  
Tordesillas L, Pacios LF, Palacín A, Cuesta-Herranz J, Madero M, Díaz-Perales A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jan;40(1):174-81.
Abstract

Recombinant phospholipase A1 (Ves v 1) from yellow jacket venom for improved diagnosis of hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.  
Seismann H, Blank S, Cifuentes L, Braren I, Bredehorst R, Grunwald T, Ollert M, Spillner E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2010 Apr 1;8(1):7
Click to view abstract

Food allergy and eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Chehade M, Aceves SS.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr 20;
Click to view abstract

Seafood workers and respiratory disease: an update.  
Jeebhay MF, Cartier A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr;10(2):104-113
Click to view abstract

Food allergy and atopic eczema.  
Worth A, Sheikh A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr 6;
Click to view abstract

Wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis. [German]  
Brans R, Ott H, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2009 Dec;60(12):956-960
Click to view abstract

Immunoglobulin E sensitization to Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants: Epidemiological study of clinical relevance and role of alcohol consumption.  
Linneberg A, Fenger RV, Husemoen LL, Vidal C, Vizcaino L, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 1;153(1):86-94
Click to view abstract

Cross-Reactivity in Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions to Sulfasalazine and Sulfamethoxazole.  
Zawodniak A, Lochmatter P, Beeler A, Pichler WJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 22;153(2):152-156

Recombinant Fusion Proteins Assembling Der p 1 and Der p 2 Allergens from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.  
Bussieres L, Bordas-Le F, Bulder I, Chabre H, Nony E, Lautrette A, Berrouet C, Nguefeu Y, Horiot S, Baron-Bodo V, Van OL, De Conti AM, Schlegel A, Maguet N, Mouz N, Lemoine P, Batard T, Moingeon P.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 21;153(2):141-151
Click to view abstract

Identification of an IgE-binding epitope of a major Buckwheat allergen, BWp16, by SPOTs assay and mimotope screening.  
Satoh R, Koyano S, Takagi K, Nakamura R, Teshima R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 21;153(2):133-140
Click to view abstract

Bees and wasps may be dangerous, but who is at risk?  
Aberer W, Sturm G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 21;153(2):107-108

Genetic polymorphisms of Adrb2 and Il10 may be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to digestive powders in exposed medical personnel.  
Ye YM, Lee HY, Kim SH, Kim SH, Kim SH, Park HS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 23;153(2):193-200
Click to view abstract

Differences among Pollen-Allergic Patients with and without Plant Food Allergy.  
Cuesta-Herranz J, Barber D, Blanco C, Cistero-Bahima A, Crespo JF, Fernandez-Rivas M, Fernandez-Sanchez J, Florido JF, Ibanez MD, Rodriguez R, Salcedo G, Garcia BE, Lombardero M, Quiralte .
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 23;153(2):182-192
Click to view abstract

The Angiotensinogen AGT p.M235T Gene Polymorphism May Be Responsible for the Development of Severe Anaphylactic Reactions to Insect Venom Allergens.  
Niedoszytko M, Ratajska M, Chelminska M, Makowiecki M, Malek E, Sieminska A, Limon J, Jassem E.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 22;153(2):166-172
Click to view abstract

Natural rubber latex hypersensitivity with skin prick test in operating room personnel.  
Nabavizadeh SH, Anushiravani A, Amin R.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Dec;8(4):219-220

Biochemical and immunological studies on eight pollen types from South assam, India.  
Sharma D, Dutta BK, Singh AB.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Dec;8(4):185-192
Click to view abstract

A 20-year analysis of previous and emerging allergens that elicit photoallergic contact dermatitis.  
Victor FC, Cohen DE, Soter NA.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Apr;62(4):605-610
Click to view abstract

Active transport of contact allergens and steroid hormones in epidermal keratinocytes is mediated by multidrug resistance related proteins.  
Heise R, Skazik C, Rodriguez F, Stanzel S, Marquardt Y, Joussen S, Wendel AF, Wosnitza M, Merk HF, Baron JM.
J Invest Dermatol 2010 Jan;130(1):305-308

Competitive indirect ELISA for the determination of parvalbumins from various fish species in food grade fish gelatins and isinglass with PARV-19 anti-parvalbumin antibodies.  
Weber P, Steinhart H, Paschke A.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Dec 9;57(23):11328-11334

Hypoallergenic legume crops and food allergy: factors affecting feasibility and risk.  
Riascos JJ, Weissinger AK, Weissinger SM, Burks AW.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jan 13;58(1):20-27

Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicon).  
Lin CH, Sheu F, Lin HT, Pan TM.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2302-2306

Biogenic amine content of shalgam (salgam): a traditional lactic acid fermented Turkish beverage.  
Ozdestan O, Uren A.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2602-2608

Methylxanthines and phenolics content extracted during the consumption of mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil) beverages.  
Meinhart AD, Bizzotto CS, Ballus CA, Poloni Rybka AC, Sobrinho MR, Cerro-Quintana RS, Teixeira-Filho J, Godoy HT.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2188-2193

Unintended compositional changes in transgenic rice seeds ( Oryza sativa L.) studied by spectral and chromatographic analysis coupled with chemometrics methods.  
Jiao Z, Si XX, Li GK, Zhang ZM, Xu XP.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Feb 10;58(3):1746-1754

Thermal stability of thaumatin-like protein, chitinase, and invertase isolated from Sauvignon blanc and Semillon juice and their role in haze formation in wine.  
Falconer RJ, Marangon M, Van Sluyter SC, Neilson KA, Chan C, Waters EJ.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jan 27;58(2):975-980

Anaphylaxis epidemiology in patients with and without asthma: A United Kingdom database review.  
Gonzalez-Perez A, Aponte Z, Vidaurre CF, Rodriguez LA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr 13;

Guilt by intimate association: What makes an allergen an allergen?  
Karp CL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr 8;
Click to view abstract

Clinical laboratory assessment of immediate-type hypersensitivity.  
Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S284-S296
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis.  
Simons FE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S161-S181
Click to view abstract

Environmental and occupational allergies.  
Peden D, Reed CE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S150-S160
Click to view abstract

Antigenicity and viability of Anisakis larvae infesting hake heated at different time-temperature conditions.  
Vidacek S, de las HC, Solas MT, Mendizabal A, Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Tejada M.
J Food Prot 2010 Jan;73(1):62-68
Click to view abstract

Skin prick test to horse should be included in the standard panel for the diagnosis of respiratory allergy.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Piccolo A, D'Amato G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):93-94

Monosensitivity to pangasius and tilapia caused by allergens other than parvalbumin.  
Ebo DG, Kuehn A, Bridts CH, Hilger C, Hentges F, Stevens WJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):84-88
Click to view abstract

Preliminary results of a skin prick test-based study of the prevalence and clinical impact of hypersensitivity to pollen panallergens (polcalcin and profilin).  
Asero R, Jimeno L, Barber D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):35-38
Click to view abstract

[What the general practitioner should know about food allergy].  
Klimek L.
MMW Fortschr Med 2010 Feb 25;152(8):31-33

Identification and characterization of the major allergen of green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as a non-specific lipid transfer protein (Pha v 3).  
Zoccatelli G, Pokoj S, Foetisch K, Bartra J, Valero A, Del Mar San Miguel-Moncin, Vieths S, Scheurer S.
Mol Immunol 2010 Apr;47(7-8):1561-1568
Click to view abstract

Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.  
Cuadrado C, Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Varela A, Guillamon E, Muzquiz M, Crespo JF, Rodriguez J, Burbano C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Nov;53(11):1462-1468
Click to view abstract

Lysozyme in wine: A risk evaluation for consumers allergic to hen's egg.  
Weber P, Kratzin H, Brockow K, Ring J, Steinhart H, Paschke A.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Nov;53(11):1469-1477

Cysteine proteinase inhibitor Act d 4 is a functional allergen contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.  
Popovic MM, Milovanovic M, Burazer L, Vuckovic O, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Knulst AC, Lindner B, Petersen A, Jankov R, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Nov 2;54(3):373-380

Peanut varieties with reduced Ara h 1 content indicating no reduced allergenicity.  
Krause S, Latendorf T, Schmidt H, rcan-Nicolaisen Y, Reese G, Petersen A, Janssen O, Becker WM.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Oct 28;54(3):381-387

Characterization of plant food allergens: an overview on physicochemical and immunological techniques.  
Harrer A, Egger M, Gadermaier G, Erler A, Hauser M, Ferreira F, Himly M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jan;54(1):93-112
Click to view abstract

Lupine, a source of new as well as hidden food allergens.  
Jappe U, Vieths S.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jan;54(1):113-126
Click to view abstract

Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in pollen and pollen products.  
Kempf M, Heil S, Hasslauer I, Schmidt L, von der OK, Theuring C, Reinhard A, Schreier P, Beuerle T.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Feb;54(2):292-300

Aspects of food processing and its effect on allergen structure.  
Paschke A.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):959-962

Food processing and allergenicity.  
Ladics GS.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):945

Impact of food processing on the structural and allergenic properties of food allergens.  
Mills EN, Sancho AI, Rigby NM, Jenkins JA, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):963-969

Utility of animal models for evaluating hypoallergenicity.  
Fritsche R.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):979-983

Effects of food processing on food allergens.  
Sathe SK, Sharma GM.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):970-978

In vitro digestion methods for assessing the effect of food structure on allergen breakdown.  
Wickham M, Faulks R, Mills C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2009 Aug;53(8):952-958

Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.  
Jennings A, Duggan E, Perry IJ, Hourihane JO.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Apr 14;
Click to view abstract

Multicenter study of repeat epinephrine treatments for food-related anaphylaxis.  
Rudders SA, Banerji A, Corel B, Clark S, Camargo CA.
Pediatrics 2010 Apr;125(4):e711-e718
Click to view abstract

[Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A report of a case and literature review].  
Meza Britez RL, del Rio Navarro BE, Ochoa LG, Pietropaolo CD, del Rio Chivardi JM, Rosas Vargas MA.
Rev Alerg Mex 2008 May;55(3):112-116
Click to view abstract

[Identification of Amaranthus palmeri pollen allergens comparing recognizing pattern between allergic and non-allergic].  
Rosas AA, Montes MJ, Garcia LE.
Rev Alerg Mex 2008 Nov;55(6):215-221
Click to view abstract

[Allergy and neurotoxicity induced by bee sting. Case report and literature review].  
Valencia Zavala MP, Sanchez Olivas JA, Sanchez Olivas MA, Montes MJ, Duarte Diaz RJ, Leon OC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2007 Sep;54(5):177-185
Click to view abstract

Food allergy mediated by IgG antibodies associated with migraine in adults.  
rroyave Hernandez CM, Echevarria PM, Hernandez Montiel HL.
Rev Alerg Mex 2007 Sep;54(5):162-168
Click to view abstract

[Sensitization to Olea europaea in a patients group of Mexico City].  
Morfin Maciel BM, Castillo Morfin BM, Barragan M.
Rev Alerg Mex 2007 Sep;54(5):156-161
Click to view abstract

Maize (Zea mays): allergen or toleragen? Participation of the cereal in allergic disease and positivity incidence in cutaneous tests.  
Valencia Zavala MP, Vega Robledo GB, Sanchez Olivas MA, Duarte Diaz RJ, Oviedo CL.
Rev Alerg Mex 2006 Nov;53(6):207-211
Click to view abstract

Comparative mites and cockroaches sensitization study in three cities of Mexico.  
Cavazos GM, Guerrero NB, Ramirez AD.
Rev Alerg Mex 2008 Nov;55(6):234-239
Click to view abstract

Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: screening for sensitization potential.  
Pucheu-Haston CM, Copeland LB, Vallanat B, Boykin E, Ward MD.
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2010 Apr 15;244(2):144-155
Click to view abstract

Defining occupational and consumer exposure limits for enzyme protein respiratory allergens under REACH.  
Basketter DA, Broekhuizen C, Fieldsend M, Kirkwood S, Mascarenhas R, Maurer K, Pedersen C, Rodriguez C, Schiff HE.
Toxicology 2010 Feb 9;268(3):165-170

Chemical allergens--what are the issues?  
Kimber I, Basketter DA, Dearman RJ.
Toxicology 2010 Feb 9;268(3):139-142
Click to view abstract

Molecular biology's entry to allergy diagnostics. [Danish]  
Hoffman HJ, Hansen KS, Mosbech H, Plaschke P.
Ugeskr Laeger 2010 Mar 22;172(12):949

World Allergy Organization (WAO) Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow's Milk Allergy (DRACMA) Guidelines.  
Alessandro Fiocchi, (Chair); Jan Brozek; Holger Schünemann, (Chair); Sami L. Bahna; Andrea von Berg; Kirsten Beyer; Martin Bozzola; Julia Bradsher; Enrico Compalati, et al.
WAO Journal 2010;3(4):157-161
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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