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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2013
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Cedar and cypress pollen counts are associated with the prevalence of allergic diseases in Japanese schoolchildren.
Read Double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of new recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v 1.
Read Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs - an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.
Read Factors that predict the clinical reactivity and tolerance in children with cow's milk allergy.
Read Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.
Read Administration of yellow fever vaccine in patients with egg allergy.
Read Oral challenges with four apple cultivars result in significant differences in oral allergy symptoms.
Read Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity.
Read Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with challenge-proven food allergy in infants.
Read Peanut protein in household dust is related to household peanut consumption and is biologically active.
Read Distribution of peanut protein in the home environment.
Read Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization
Read Dehydrated egg white: An allergen source for improving efficacy and safety in the diagnosis and treatment for egg allergy.

Abstracts shared in April 2013 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Serum gliadin monitoring extracts patients with false negative results in challenge tests for the diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Systemic contact dermatitis due to zinc successfully treated with a zinc-restricted diet: a case report.
Read 'Bitter Sweet': A child case of erythritol-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Moving from peanut extract to peanut components: towards validation of component-resolved IgE tests.
Read Airborne seafood allergens as a cause of occupational allergy and asthma.
Read New food allergies in a European Non-Mediterranean Region: Is Cannabis sativa to blame?
Read Efficacy of recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy in patients with asthma and/or rhinitis.
Read Rice allergy demonstrated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge in peach-allergic patients is related to lipid transfer protein reactivity.
Read Gly m 4 as a marker for severe food-allergic reactions to soy.
Read Sensitization to Cor a 9 and Cor a 14 is highly specific for a hazelnut allergy with objective symptoms in Dutch children and adults.
Read Characterization of the sensitization profile to lupin in peanut-allergic children and assessment of cross-reactivity risk.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cedar and cypress pollen counts are associated with the prevalence of allergic diseases in Japanese schoolchildren.
Patients allergic to pollen have been known to become more symptomatic during pollen season compared with the nonpollen season. This ecological analysis was conducted to evaluate whether pollen exposure is associated with the prevalence of allergic diseases in schoolchildren. Pollen count data of Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress, the major pollen allergens in Japan. The prevalence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children aged 6-7 years was positively associated with both cedar and cypress pollen counts, whereas the prevalence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children aged 13-14 years was positively associated with only cypress pollen counts. Furthermore, the prevalence of asthma was positively associated with cedar pollen counts in 6- to 7-year-old children but not cypress pollen counts in either age group.

Cedar and cypress pollen counts are associated with the prevalence of allergic diseases in Japanese schoolchildren.  
Yoshida K, Adachi Y, Akashi M, Itazawa T, Murakami Y, Odajima H, Ohya Y, Akasawa A.
Allergy 2013 Apr 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of new recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v 1.
This study aimed to find the optimal dose of a new hypoallergenic folding variant of recombinant Bet v 1 (rBet v 1-FV) as SIT for patients with birch pollen allergy, and concludes that considering efficacy, immunological response, and tolerability, a maintenance dose of 80 mug of rBet v 1-FV appears to be the ideal dose for allergen immunotherapy in birch pollen allergic patients.

Double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of new recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v 1 in an environmental exposure chamber.  
Meyer W, Narkus A, Salapatek AM, Hafner D.
Allergy 2013 Apr 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs - an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.
Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable indicator of true hypersensitivity.To promote and standardize reproducible skin testing with safe and nonirritant drug concentrations in the clinical practice, the European Network and European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Interest Group on Drug Allergy has performed a literature search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, they have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group and recommend drug concentration for skin testing aiming to achieve a specificity of at least 95%. It has been possible to recommend specific drug concentration for betalactam antibiotics, perioperative drugs, heparins, platinum salts and radiocontrast media. For many other drugs, there is insufficient evidence to recommend appropriate drug concentration. There is urgent need for multicentre studies designed to establish and validate drug skin test concentration using standard protocols. For most drugs, sensitivity of skin testing is higher in immediate hypersensitivity compared to nonimmediate hypersensitivity.

Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs - an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.  
Brockow K, Garvey LH, Aberer W, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Barbaud A, Bilo MB, Bircher A, Blanca M, Bonadonna B, Campi P, Castro E, Cernadas JR, Chiriac AM, Demoly P, Grosber M, Gooi J, Lombardo .
Allergy 2013 Apr 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Factors that predict the clinical reactivity and tolerance in children with cow's milk allergy.
The objective of this study was to examine the performance of sIgE analysis and the utility of the genetic variants of CD14, STAT6, IL13, IL10, SPINK5, and TSLP in predicting the clinical course in children with CMA. Serum sIgE levels of 94 children who underwent open food challenges and 54 children with anaphylaxis due to cow's milk (CM) were retrospectively analyzed between January 2002 and May 2009. The genetic polymorphisms were determined in 72 children. A total of 148 children were followed up for a median of 3.5 years, and 42 of the 94 challenge results were positive. The probability curves with 95% decision points were 2.8 kU/L for younger than 1 year, 11.1 for younger than 2 years, 11.7 for younger than 4 years, and 13.7 for younger than 6 years. Sixty-six children outgrew CMA during follow-up. Children with initial an CM sIgE level less than 6 kU/L outgrew CMA earlier than children with an initial CM sIgE level of 6 kU/L or higher (P < .001). The age of tolerance development for CM was significantly higher in children with the GG genotype at rs324015 of the STAT6 gene compared with those with the AA+AG genotype (2 years [range, 1.5-3.9 years] vs 1.2 years [range, 1.0-2.2 years]) (P = .02). The decision points of sIgE obtained in different age groups may help to determine the likelihood of clinical reactivity more precisely. The results suggest that sIgE levels and STAT6 gene variants may be important determinants to predict longer persistence of CMA.

Factors that predict the clinical reactivity and tolerance in children with cow's milk allergy.  
Yavuz ST, Buyuktiryaki B, Sahiner UM, Birben E, Tuncer A, Yakarisik S, Karabulut E, Kalayci O, Sackesen C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):284-289

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.
Cephalosporins are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics. Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other beta-lactam antibiotics, namely, penicillin. Historically, frequent reports of anaphylaxis following administration of first- and second-generation cephalosporins to patients with a history of penicillin allergy led to the belief of a high degree of allergic cross-reactivity. More recent evidence reveals a significantly lower risk of cross-reactivity between penicillins and the newer-generation cephalosporins. The current thought is that a shared side chain, rather than the beta-lactam ring structure, is the determining factor in immunologic cross-reactivity. Understanding the chemical structure of these agents has allowed us to identify the allergenic determinants for penicillin; however, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood. For this reason, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available for cephalosporins as it is for penicillin. Nevertheless, skin testing to the cephalosporin in question, using a nonirritating concentration, provides additional information, which can further guide the work-up of a patient suspected of having an allergy to that drug. Together, the history and the skin test results can assist the allergist in the decision to recommend continued drug avoidance or to perform a graded challenge versus an induction of tolerance procedure

Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.  
Dickson SD, Salazar KC.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 Apr 2;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Administration of yellow fever vaccine in patients with egg allergy.
The population of large parts of Africa, South America and travellers to these areas are at risk of yellow fever (YF) with a 50% mortality risk. Yellow fever vaccine (YFV) propagated in hens' eggs confers protection in 95% of the vaccinated. The rate of anaphylaxis for YFV ranges from 0.42 to 1.8/100,000 doses with most cases considered to be due to egg allergy. Egg allergy is a contraindication for the YFV. Nevertheless, the potential fatal sequelae from YF give the incentive to protect everyone at risk irrespective of their allergic status. Six subjects who had had a recent reaction to egg and who were travelling to endemic areas (3 adults and 3 children) underwent skin prick tests (SPT) with undiluted YFV and egg extract. Intradermal tests for YFV were undertaken at a 1:10 dilution. In 4 egg-allergic patients with a positive SPT to YFV, a 7-step desensitization protocol was used. A 2-step (10 + 90%) protocol was used in the 2 subjects with a negative YFV SPT. Premedication was not administered. All 6 patients were successfully vaccinated. Four patients completed desensitization: 1 developed mild local erythema at the injection site, 1 had fleeting generalized urticaria with local erythema/angioedema and 2 did not experience any adverse reactions. Patients who received YFV in 2 steps developed no adverse reactions.

Administration of yellow fever vaccine in patients with egg allergy.  
Rutkowski K, Ewan PW, Nasser SM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):274-278

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oral challenges with four apple cultivars result in significant differences in oral allergy symptoms.
The hypoallergenic potential of a recently bred apple selection with unusually low content of Mal d 1 was assessed, using an oral challenge model with three additional apple cultivars for comparison. Sixty-six birch pollen-allergic individuals with a history of oral allergy syndrome after apple intake were subjected to a double-blind oral provocation with two apple cultivars (B:0654 and 'Discovery'). Thirteen also tested two other apple cultivars ('Ingrid Marie' and 'Gloster'). B:0654 induced significantly higher TOS than 'Discovery' when tested by 66 individuals, in spite of its lower Mal d 1 content. TOS values were higher in females and increased with increasing age of the individuals when challenged with 'Discovery'. Among the 13 individuals who tested all four cultivars, B:0654 produced a higher score after the second dose compared to 'Ingrid Marie'. This was also the case after the third dose compared to 'Ingrid Marie' and 'Gloster', and again 30 min after the last intake compared to each of the other three cultivars, as well as a higher TOS compared to each of the other three cultivars (all p < 0.01). Therefore significant differences were seen among the apple cultivars and contrary to expectations, B:0654 was less well tolerated than the other three cultivars.

Oral challenges with four apple cultivars result in significant differences in oral allergy symptoms.  
Nybom H, Cervin-Hoberg C, Andersson M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):258-264

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity.
Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy. This study found that loss-of-function mutations in the FLG gene were significantly associated with self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity, but not with oral allergy syndrome (OAS). These findings, if confirmed, support the idea that skin barrier functions may be involved in the pathogenesis of food allergy

Association between loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity.  
Linneberg A, Fenger RV, Husemoen LL, Thuesen BH, Skaaby T, Gonzalez-Quintela A, Vidal C, Carlsen BC, Johansen JD, Menne T, Stender S, Melgaard M, Szecsi PB, Berg ND, Thyssen JP.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):234-242

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with challenge-proven food allergy in infants.
Epidemiological evidence has shown that pediatric food allergy is more prevalent in regions further from the equator, suggesting that vitamin D insufficiency may play a role in this disease. This study investigated the role of vitamin D status in infantile food allergy. A population sample of 5276 one-year-old infants underwent skin prick testing to peanut, egg, sesame, and cow's milk or shrimp. All those with a detectable wheal and a random sample of participants with negative skin prick test results attended a hospital-based food challenge clinic. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured. Infants of Australian-born parents, but not of parents born overseas, with vitamin D insufficiency (/=2) rather than a single food allergy. The authors conclude that these results provide the first direct evidence that vitamin D sufficiency may be an important protective factor for food allergy in the first year of life.

Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with challenge-proven food allergy in infants.  
Allen KJ, Koplin JJ, Ponsonby AL, Gurrin LC, Wake M, Vuillermin P, Martin P, Matheson M, Lowe A, Robinson M, Tey D, Osborne NJ, Dang T, Tina Tan HT, Thiele L, Anderson D, Czech H, Sanjeevan J, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;131(4):1109-1116

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut protein in household dust is related to household peanut consumption and is biologically active.
This study sought to explore the relationship between reported household peanut consumption (HPC; used as an indirect marker of environmental peanut exposure) and peanut protein levels in an infant's home environment and to determine the biological activity of environmental peanut. Peanut protein was quantified in wipe and dust samples collected from 45 homes with infants by using a polyclonal peanut ELISA. Environmental peanut protein levels were compared with peanut consumption assessed by using a validated peanut food frequency questionnaire and other clinical and household factors. Biological activity of peanut protein in dust was assessed with a basophil activation assay. There was a positive correlation between peanut protein levels in the infant's bed, crib rail, and play area and reported HPC over 1 and 6 months. On multivariate regression analysis, HPC was the most important variable associated with peanut protein levels in the infant's bed sheet and play area. Dust samples containing high peanut protein levels induced dose-dependent activation of basophils in children with peanut allergy. Therefore an infant's environmental exposure to peanut is most likely to be due to HPC. Peanut protein in dust is biologically active and should be assessed as a route of possible early peanut sensitization in infants.

Peanut protein in household dust is related to household peanut consumption and is biologically active.  
Brough HA, Santos AF, Makinson K, Penagos M, Stephens AC, Douiri A, Fox AT, Du Toit TG, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Distribution of peanut protein in the home environment.
Peanut spread easily around the home and might be resistant to usual cleaning methods. Peanut protein can be transferred into the environment by means of hand transfer and saliva but is unlikely to be aerosolized

Distribution of peanut protein in the home environment.  
Brough HA, Makinson K, Penagos M, Maleki SJ, Cheng H, Douiri A, Stephens AC, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization
This reports on a high prevalence of quaternary ammonium sensitization in patients with quinolone allergic hypersensitivity. These results suggest a new way for NMBA sensitization. It thus seems appropriate to investigate neuromuscular blocking agents sensitization when quinolone allergic hypersensitivity is diagnosed.

Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization  
Paul Rouzaire, Audrey Nosbaum, Christine Mullet, Nathalie Diot, Rolande Dubost, Françoise Bienvenu, Laurence Guilloux, Vincent Piriou, Jacques Bienvenu, Frédéric Bérard
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dehydrated egg white: An allergen source for improving efficacy and safety in the diagnosis and treatment for egg allergy.
This is the first time that it is shown that the allergenicity of commercially available dehydrated egg white (DEW) is equivalent to raw egg whites. In vivo and in vitro tests showed that processing of DEW does not affect the allergenicity of egg proteins. DEW is an effective and microbiologically safer source of allergen for the diagnosis of egg allergy. Furthermore, DEW can be used in egg oral immunotherapy.

Dehydrated egg white: An allergen source for improving efficacy and safety in the diagnosis and treatment for egg allergy.  
Escudero C, Sanchez-Garcia S, Rodriguez Del RP, Pastor-Vargas C, Garcia-Fernandez C, Perez-Rangel I, Ramirez-Jimenez A, Ibanez MD.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):263-269

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Serum gliadin monitoring extracts patients with false negative results in challenge tests for the diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Kohno K, Matsuo H, Takahashi H, Niihara H, Chinuki Y, Kaneko S, Honjoh T, Horikawa T, Mihara S, Morita E.
Allergol Int 2013 Apr 25;
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Positive skin prick test to cefcapene pivoxil hydrochloride hydrate: a case report.  
Yamazato S, Nakai N, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2013 Apr 25;

Systemic contact dermatitis due to zinc successfully treated with a zinc-restricted diet: a case report.  
Sakai T, Hatano Y, Fujiwara S.
Allergol Int 2013 Apr 25;

'Bitter Sweet': A child case of erythritol-induced anaphylaxis.  
Shirao K, Inoue M, Tokuda R, Nagao M, Yamaguchi M, Okahata H, Fujisawa T.
Allergol Int 2013 Apr 25;

Introduction of complementary foods in infancy and atopic sensitization at the age of 5 years: timing and food diversity in a Finnish birth cohort.  
Nwaru BI, Takkinen HM, Niemela O, Kaila M, Erkkola M, Ahonen S, Tuomi H, Haapala AM, Kenward MG, Pekkanen J, Lahesmaa R, Kere J, Simell O, Veijola R, Ilonen J, Hyoty H, Knip M, Virtanen SM.
Allergy 2013 Apr;68(4):507-516
Click to view abstract

The crux with a reliable in vitro and in vivo diagnosis of allergy.  
Crameri R.
Allergy 2013 Apr 27;

Cedar and cypress pollen counts are associated with the prevalence of allergic diseases in Japanese schoolchildren.  
Yoshida K, Adachi Y, Akashi M, Itazawa T, Murakami Y, Odajima H, Ohya Y, Akasawa A.
Allergy 2013 Apr 29;
Click to view abstract

Moving from peanut extract to peanut components: towards validation of component-resolved IgE tests.  
Aalberse JA, Meijer Y, Derksen N, van dP, Knol E, Aalberse RC.
Allergy 2013 Apr 29;
Click to view abstract

A phase 1 study of heat/phenol-killed, E. coli-encapsulated, recombinant modified peanut proteins Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 (EMP-123) for the treatment of peanut allergy.  
Wood RA, Sicherer SH, Burks AW, Grishin A, Henning AK, Lindblad R, Stablein D, Sampson HA.
Allergy 2013 Apr 29;
Click to view abstract

IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and allergic reactions to idursulfase in patients with Hunter syndrome.  
Kim J, Park MR, Kim DS, Lee JO, Maeng SH, Cho SY, Han Y, Ahn K, Jin DK.
Allergy 2013 Apr 29;
Click to view abstract

Double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of new recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v 1 in an environmental exposure chamber.  
Meyer W, Narkus A, Salapatek AM, Hafner D.
Allergy 2013 Apr 27;
Click to view abstract

Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs - an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.  
Brockow K, Garvey LH, Aberer W, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Barbaud A, Bilo MB, Bircher A, Blanca M, Bonadonna B, Campi P, Castro E, Cernadas JR, Chiriac AM, Demoly P, Grosber M, Gooi J, Lombardo .
Allergy 2013 Apr 25;
Click to view abstract

Can allergen-specific IgE antibodies diagnose egg allergy accurately?  
Kim KW, Kim KE.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):117-118

Nasal provocation test using allergen extract versus cold dry air provocation test: Which and when?  
Kim YH, Jang TY.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2013 Mar;27(2):113-117
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Allergen of the month-European olive.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):A19

Successful intravaginal graded challenge after a systemic reaction with skin prick testing to seminal fluid.  
Baker TW, Ghosh D, Bernstein JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):301-303

Factors that predict the clinical reactivity and tolerance in children with cow's milk allergy.  
Yavuz ST, Buyuktiryaki B, Sahiner UM, Birben E, Tuncer A, Yakarisik S, Karabulut E, Kalayci O, Sackesen C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):284-289
Click to view abstract

Role of parental atopy in cow's milk allergy: a population-based study.  
Goldberg M, Eisenberg E, Elizur A, Rajuan N, Rachmiel M, Cohen A, Zadik-Mnuhin G, Katz Y.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):279-283
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Clinical value of radiocontrast media skin tests as a prescreening and diagnostic tool in hypersensitivity reactions.  
Kim SH, Jo EJ, Kim MY, Lee SE, Kim MH, Yang MS, Song WJ, Choi SI, Kim JH, Chang YS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):258-262
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Characteristics of allergic sensitization among asthmatic adults older than 55 years: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006.  
Busse PJ, Cohn RD, Salo PM, Zeldin DC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):247-252
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Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis.  
Silva MP, Baroody FM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Apr;110(4):217-222

The epidemiology of food allergy in Europe: protocol for a systematic review.  
Nwaru BI, Panesar SS, Hickstein L, Rader T, Werfel T, Muraro A, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Roberts G, Sheikh A.
Clin Transl Allergy 2013;3(1):13

Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.  
Dickson SD, Salazar KC.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 Apr 2;
Click to view abstract

What is the source of serum allergen-specific IgE?  
Eckl-Dorna J, Niederberger V.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2013 Apr 13;
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Airborne seafood allergens as a cause of occupational allergy and asthma.  
Lopata AL, Jeebhay MF.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2013 Apr 11;
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Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis.  
Kreiss K.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;13(2):167-172
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The use of specific inhalation challenge in hypersensitivity pneumonitis.  
Munoz X, Morell F, Cruz MJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;13(2):151-158
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The value of mucosal allergen challenge for the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Kvenshagen BK, Jacobsen M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 6;
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Food allergy: the perspectives of prevention using vitamin D.  
Peroni DG, Boner AL.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 3;
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Randomized controlled trials investigating the role of allergen exposure in food allergy: where are we now?  
Metcalfe J, Prescott SL, Palmer DJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 3;
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New food allergies in a European Non-Mediterranean Region: Is Cannabis sativa to blame?  
Ebo DG, Swerts S, Sabato V, Hagendorens MM, Bridts CH, Jorens PG, De Clerck LS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):220-228
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Efficacy of recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy in patients with asthma and/or rhinitis.  
Barbosa MC, Santos AB, Ferriani VP, Pomes A, Chapman MD, Arruda LK.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):213-219
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Allergy prevention via co-administration of intact food allergen and its epitope soup?  
Jarvinen KM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):195-196

Allergen content and in vivo allergenic activity of house dust mite extracts.  
Casset A, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):287-288

Administration of yellow fever vaccine in patients with egg allergy.  
Rutkowski K, Ewan PW, Nasser SM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):274-278
Click to view abstract

Rice allergy demonstrated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge in peach-allergic patients is related to lipid transfer protein reactivity.  
Pastorello EA, Scibilia J, Farioli L, Primavesi L, Giuffrida MG, Mascheri A, Piantanida M, Mirone C, Stafylaraki C, Violetta MR, Nichelatti M, Preziosi D, Losappio L, Pravettoni V.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):265-273
Click to view abstract

Oral challenges with four apple cultivars result in significant differences in oral allergy symptoms.  
Nybom H, Cervin-Hoberg C, Andersson M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):258-264
Click to view abstract

Allergen chip diagnosis for soy-allergic patients: Gly m 4 as a marker for severe food-allergic reactions to soy.  
Berneder M, Bublin M, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Hawranek T, Lang R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Mar 15;161(3):229-233

Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with challenge-proven food allergy in infants.  
Allen KJ, Koplin JJ, Ponsonby AL, Gurrin LC, Wake M, Vuillermin P, Martin P, Matheson M, Lowe A, Robinson M, Tey D, Osborne NJ, Dang T, Tina Tan HT, Thiele L, Anderson D, Czech H, Sanjeevan J, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;131(4):1109-1116
Click to view abstract

Determination of allergen specificity by heavy chains in grass pollen allergen-specific IgE antibodies.  
Gadermaier E, Flicker S, Lupinek C, Steinberger P, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr;131(4):1185-1193
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Peanut protein in household dust is related to household peanut consumption and is biologically active.  
Brough HA, Santos AF, Makinson K, Penagos M, Stephens AC, Douiri A, Fox AT, Du Toit TG, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

Distribution of peanut protein in the home environment.  
Brough HA, Makinson K, Penagos M, Maleki SJ, Cheng H, Douiri A, Stephens AC, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis-more than a fungal disease?  
Dutre T, Al DS, Zhang N, Bachert C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 19;

Sensitization to Cor a 9 and Cor a 14 is highly specific for a hazelnut allergy with objective symptoms in Dutch children and adults.  
Masthoff LJ, Mattsson L, Zuidmeer-Jongejan L, Lidholm J, Andersson K, Akkerdaas JH, Versteeg SA, Garino C, Meijer Y, Kentie P, Versluis A, den Hartog Jager CF, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Knulst.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr 10;
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Treatment of patients with a history of penicillin allergy in a large tertiary-care academic hospital  
Matthieu Picard, Philippe Bégin, Hugues Bouchard, Jonathan Cloutier, Jonathan Lacombe-Barrios, Jean Paradis, Anne Des Roches, Brian Laufer, Louis Paradis
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Safely diagnosing clinically significant penicillin allergy using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine, penicillin, and oral amoxicillin  
Eric Macy, Eunis W. Ngor
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

The time for penicillin skin testing is here. Editorial  
Roland Solensky
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
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Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization  
Paul Rouzaire, Audrey Nosbaum, Christine Mullet, Nathalie Diot, Rolande Dubost, Françoise Bienvenu, Laurence Guilloux, Vincent Piriou, Jacques Bienvenu, Frédéric Bérard
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
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Canadian allergists' and nonallergists' perception of epinephrine use and vaccination of persons with egg allergy  
Marylin Desjardins, Ann Clarke, Reza Alizadehfar, Danielle Grenier, Harley Eisman, Stuart Carr, Timothy K. Vander Leek, Lee Teperman, Niamh Higgins, Lawrence Joseph, Greg Shand, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):289-294
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Ask the expert: anaphylactic reaction to white-faced hornet sting and elevated baseline (asymptomatic) serum tryptase  
Phillip Lieberman, Lawrence B. Schwartz
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
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Successful treatment of idiopathic angioedema with ecallantide  
Alalia Berry, Rafael Firszt
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):
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Gelatin-containing sweets can elicit anaphylaxis in a patient with sensitization to galactose-a-1,3-galactose  
Patricia Caponetto, Jörg Fischer, Tilo Biedermann
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(3):302-303
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Dehydrated egg white: An allergen source for improving efficacy and safety in the diagnosis and treatment for egg allergy.  
Escudero C, Sanchez-Garcia S, Rodriguez Del RP, Pastor-Vargas C, Garcia-Fernandez C, Perez-Rangel I, Ramirez-Jimenez A, Ibanez MD.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):263-269
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Predicting positive food challenges in children sensitised to peanuts/tree nuts.  
Ludman S, Ballabeni P, Eigennman PA, Wassenberg J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):276-281
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Phenobarbital-induced severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions are associated with CYP2C19*2 in Thai children.  
Manuyakorn W, Siripool K, Kamchaisatian W, Pakakasama S, Visudtibhan A, Vilaiyuk S, Rujirawat T, Benjaponpitak S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):299-303
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Sensitization to Malassezia in children with atopic dermatitis combined with food allergy.  
Kekki OM, Scheynius A, Poikonen S, Koskinen A, Kautiainen H, Turjanmaa K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):244-249
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Characterization of the sensitization profile to lupin in peanut-allergic children and assessment of cross-reactivity risk.  
Ballabio C, Penas E, Uberti F, Fiocchi A, Duranti M, Magni C, Restani P.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):270-275
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The most common aeroallergens in a tropical region in Southwestern Iran  
Mohammad-Ali Assarehzadegan*, AbdolHossein Shakurnia and Akram Amini
WAO Journal 2013;6(1):7
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