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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2017
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the April 2017 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Skincare products containing low concentrations of formaldehyde detected by the chromotropic acid method cannot be safely used in formaldehyde-allergic patients.
Read Prevalence of fragrance contact allergy in the general population of five European countries: a cross-sectional study.
Read Patch testing with main sensitizers does not detect all cases of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil.
Read High serum total IgE predicts poor long-term outcome in atopic dermatitis.
Read Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real?
Read Allergens involved in the cross-reactivity of Aedes aegypti with other arthropods.
Read Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity.
Read Component-resolved diagnostics in Thai children with cow's milk and egg allergy.
Read Cocktails and sunbeds: beware!.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?
Read Cypress pollinosis: from tree to clinic.
Read Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by Chinese honeysuckle / Rangoon creeper
Read Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes.
Read Contact allergy to essential oils cannot always be predicted from allergy to fragrance markers in the baseline series.
Read Contact allergy resulting from the use of acrylate nails is increasing in both users and those who are occupationally exposed.
Read High prevalence of contact allergy in adolescence: results from the population-based BAMSE birth cohort.
Read Methylisothiazolinone in selected consumer products in Belgium: Adding fuel to the fire?
Read Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.
Read Occupational contact dermatitis caused by nickel in scratchcards.
Read Self-reported adverse tattoo reactions: a New York City Central Park study.
Read New insights into cockroach allergens.
Read Food labeling issues in patients with severe food allergies: solving a hamlet-like doubt.
Read Essential Oils, Part I: Introduction.
Read What is the relevance of contact allergy to sodium metabisulfite and which concentration of the allergen should we use?
Read Occupational protein contact dermatitis.
Read Skin diseases in musicians.
Read Adverse reactions to biologic therapy.
Read Effect of thermal processing on mealworm allergenicity.
Read Prediction of cashew nut allergy in sensitised children.
Read Excipients in oral antihistamines can perpetuate allergic contact dermatitis.
Read Is patch testing with food additives useful in children with atopic eczema?
Read Surgery-related contact dermatitis: a review of potential irritants and allergens.
Read Purification and characterization of protamine, the allergen from the milt of Large Yellow Croaker
Read Enzymatic hydrolysis does not reduce the biological reactivity of soybean proteins for all allergic subjects.
Read Qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oils
Read Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.
Read Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Consumer safety
Read Revision of the opinion on peanut oil - Sensitisation only.

Snippets posted in the April 2017 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Fish-collagen allergy: a pitfall of the prick-to-prick test with raw fish.
Read Salt-dependent aquagenic urticaria
Read Mammalian milk allergy: allergy to goat’s and sheep’s milk, but tolerance to cow’s milk proteins
Read Preventing food allergies with tweaks to the infant diet: A practical reality?
Read Mosquito Allergy in Children: Clinical features and limitation of commercially-available diagnostic tests.
Read Contact urticaria after honey ingestion
Read Lettuce contact allergy.
Read Systemic sodium metabisulfite allergy.
Read Systemic contact dermatitis due to flaxseed ingestion
Read Benzoate allergy in children--from foods to personal hygiene products.
Read The major soybean allergen Gly m Bd 28K induces hypersensitivity reactions in mice sensitized to cow's milk proteins.
Read Presence of undeclared food allergens in cumin

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skincare products containing low concentrations of formaldehyde detected by the chromotropic acid method cannot be safely used in formaldehyde-allergic patients.
This study examined the effects of low concentrations of formaldehyde on irritant contact dermatitis in formaldehyde-allergic individuals. Fifteen formaldehyde-allergic individuals and a control group of 12 individuals without contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers were included in the study. The individuals performed the repeated open application test (ROAT) during 4 weeks with four different moisturizers releasing formaldehyde in concentrations that had been determined as > 40, 20-40, 2.5-10 and 0 p.p.m. by the chromotropic acid (CA) spot test. Dimethyloldimethylhydantoin was used as a formaldehyde releaser in the moisturizers. The ROAT was performed on areas of experimentally induced sodium lauryl sulfate dermatitis. The study was double blind, controlled and randomized. The study concludes that the results demonstrate that the low concentrations of formaldehyde often found in skincare products by the CA method are sufficient to worsen an existing dermatitis in formaldehyde-allergic individuals.

Skincare products containing low concentrations of formaldehyde detected by the chromotropic acid method cannot be safely used in formaldehyde-allergic patients.  
Hauksson I, Ponten A, Gruvberger B, Isaksson M, Engfeldt M, Bruze M.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Feb;174(2):371-379

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of fragrance contact allergy in the general population of five European countries: a cross-sectional study.
This study determined the prevalence of fragrance contact allergy in the European general population and assessed the clinical relevance of positive patch test reactions to different fragrances. In five European countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and Sweden) a random sample from the general population aged 18-74 years was drawn. In total, 12 377 subjects were interviewed in this cross-sectional study and a random sample (n = 3119) was patch tested using the TRUE Test and Finn Chamber techniques. Patch test procedures were harmonized by mandatory training before the study and monitoring during the study. The highest prevalence for contact allergy of 2.6% was found for fragrance mix (FM) I in petrolatum, with a high content of atranol and chloratranol, followed by 1.9% for FM II in petrolatum. The conservatively estimated prevalence of fragrance contact allergy was 1.9% .

Prevalence of fragrance contact allergy in the general population of five European countries: a cross-sectional study.  
Diepgen TL, Ofenloch R, Bruze M, Cazzaniga S, Coenraads PJ, Elsner P, Goncalo M, Svensson A, Naldi L.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Dec;173(6):1411-1419

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patch testing with main sensitizers does not detect all cases of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil.
Lavender oil is an essential oil obtained from lavender (Lavendula angustifolia). The main components linalool and linalyl acetate have been shown to autoxidize in contact with oxygen in the air, forming sensitizing hydroperoxides. Patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were consecutively patch-tested with oxidized lavender oil 6% pet., oxidized linalyl acetate 6% pet., and oxidized linalool 6% pet. to investigate the frequency of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil, and the pattern of concomitant reactions to oxidized linalool and oxidized linalyl acetate. Positive reactions to oxidized lavender oil were found in 2.8% of the patients. Among those, 56% reacted to oxidized linalool and/or oxidized linalyl acetate, while 52% reacted to the fragrance markers of the baseline series. Oxidized lavender oil showed among the highest frequencies of contact allergy to studied essential oils. A well-standardized preparation of oxidized lavender oil could be a useful tool for diagnosis of contact allergy to fragrances.

Patch testing with main sensitizers does not detect all cases of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil.  
Hagvall L, Christensson JB.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jun 15;96(5):679-683

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
High serum total IgE predicts poor long-term outcome in atopic dermatitis.
Most patients with severe atopic dermatitis have elevated serum IgE levels, but there has been little research into IgE as a predictive biomarker in long-term disease outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of IgE and other factors in patients with atopic dermatitis in a university clinic setting. There were 169 eligible patients (14-78 years) with a mean follow-up of 4.15 years. High baseline IgE (>/= 10,000 IU/ml) was the most important patient-related factor for a poor long-term outcome, being negatively associated with good treatment response (odds ratio (OR) 0.062, p = 0.002). Only 14.3% of patients with this high baseline IgE achieved a good treatment response in follow-up, compared with 79.7% in patients with lower (< 1,000) IgE values (p < 0.001). Serum total IgE may provide an easily measurable way to predict long-term outcome, and to help to select those patients in need of closer follow-up

High serum total IgE predicts poor long-term outcome in atopic dermatitis.  
Kiiski V, Karlsson O, Remitz A, Reitamo S.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Nov;95(8):943-947

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real?
Many recent studies discredit breastfeeding protection against coeliac disease. We will try to answer the question: 'Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real?'

Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real?  
Girbovan A, Sur G, Samasca G, Lupan I.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Apr 11;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens involved in the cross-reactivity of Aedes aegypti with other arthropods.
Cross-reactivity between Aedes aegypti and mites, cockroaches, and shrimp has been previously suggested, but the involved molecular components have not been fully described. This study evaluated the cross-reactivity between A aegypti and other arthropods. Thirty-four serum samples from patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis were selected, and specific IgE to A aegypti, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Blomia tropicalis, Periplaneta americana. and Litopenaeus vannamei was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cross-reactivity was investigated using pooled serum samples from allergic patients, allergenic extracts, and the recombinant tropomyosins (Aed a 10.0201, Der p 10, Blo t 10, Lit v 1, and Per a 7). Frequency of positive IgE reactivity was 82.35% to at least one mite species, 64.7% to A aegypti, 29.4% to P americana, and 23.5% to L vannamei. The highest IgE cross-reactivity was seen between A aegypti and D pteronyssinus (96.6%) followed by L vannamei (95.4%), B tropicalis (84.4%), and P americana (75.4%). Recombinant tropomyosins from mites, cockroach, or shrimp inhibited the IgE reactivity to the mosquito at a lower extent than the extracts from these arthropods. Several bands of A aegypti cross-reacted with arthropod extracts, and 4 of them were identified as odorant binding protein, mitochondrial cytochrome C, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, and protein with hypothetical magnesium ion binding function. Four novel cross-reactive allergens were identified in A aegypti allergenic extract. These molecules could influence the manifestation of allergy to environmental allergens in the tropics.

Allergens involved in the cross-reactivity of Aedes aegypti with other arthropods.  
Cantillo JF, Puerta L, Lafosse-Marin S, Subiza JL, Caraballo L, Fernandez-Caldas E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr 20;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity.
This review article concludes that celiac disease (CD) is an increasingly prevalent autoimmune condition that requires a multisystem approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Serologic tests and duodenal biopsy help confirm the diagnosis. Irritable bowel syndrome and nonceliac gluten sensitivity need exclusion. Patients require education about which foods are safe to eat and which to avoid. Often, referral to a dietician is necessary.

Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity.  
Cui C, Basen T, Philipp AT, Yusin J, Krishnaswamy G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):389-393

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Component-resolved diagnostics in Thai children with cow's milk and egg allergy.
We aimed to investigate sensitization against cow's milk and egg white components, and to study the clinical usefulness of serum food-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) to cow's milk and egg white components in Thai children with cow's milk and egg allergies. Specific IgE against cow's milk, egg white, alpha-lactalbumin (ALA), beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), casein, ovomucoid, ovalbumin and conalbumin were measured. Thirteen cow's milk allergic subjects and 32 egg allergic subjects were identified. The sensitization rate to BLG and casein was 91.7%, followed by ALA (66.7%) for cow's milk, and the sensitization rate to ovalbumin was 93.8%, followed by ovomucoid (81.3%) and conalbumin (37.5%) for egg. Patients in the urticaria group had a higher level of casein sIgE than the atopic dermatitis (AD) group but this difference was not significant (9.8 kUA/L vs. 0.9 kUA/L, p = 0.11). The level of ovomucoid sIgE was significantly higher in the non-AD group than in the AD group (3.8 kUA/L vs. 1.3 kUA/L, p = 0.048). Therefore BLG and casein for cow's milk and ovomucoid and ovalbumin for egg were the common components causing sensitization in cow's milk and egg allergic patients. Among the patients with cow's milk allergy, the level of casein sIgE in the urticaria group tended to be higher than the AD group, and in egg allergic patients, the non-AD group had a significantly higher ovomucoid sIgE level compared with the AD group.

Component-resolved diagnostics in Thai children with cow's milk and egg allergy.  
Jessadapakorn W, Sangsupawanich P, Wootipoom N, Suddeaugrai O, Yuenyongviwat A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 1;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cocktails and sunbeds: beware!.
A 22-year-old woman presented with an 8-day history of a blistering eruption. Initially, she had developed patches of tender erythema on the dorsa of her hands and on her forearms. This then progressed and became more extensive to involve her anterior chest and medial thighs. Prior to the onset of her blistering eruption, she had been working in the bar manually squeezing limes for mojitos, and had spilled a large quantity of juice on herself while doing it. After work, she then used a sunbed for approximately 20 min. The next morning she awoke with the areas of painful erythema as described.

Cocktails and sunbeds: beware!.  
Eustace K, Azurdia RM.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2016 Mar;41(2):227-228

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?
Hypersensitivity to para-phenylenediamine (PPD) and related compounds induced by temporary black henna tattoos has become a serious health problem worldwide. Different patterns of sensitization with various clinical aspects are described in literature due to PPD associated to henna tattoo and these manifestations are likely correlated with the immunological and dermatological pathomechanisms involved. Henna is the Persian name of the plant Lawsonia inermis, Fam. Lythraceae. It is a woody shrub that grow in regions of North Africa, South Asia, India and Sri Lanka. Nowadays it is rather frequent to see temporary 'tattoos' performed with henna. To make tattoos darker and long-lasting PPD has been associated to henna in tattoo drawings mixtures, so obtaining 'black henna'. In these years there has been a rise of contact sensitization to PPD and in medical literature an increased number of cases have been reported on temporary henna tattoo application. Here we review the various clinical patterns related to PPD and henna tattoo, to investigate the possible link between clinic-morphological pictures and the immunological response to PPD and henna. The literature underlines that different clinical manifestations are related to black henna containing PPD, and its derivative products may cause delayed-type as well as immediate-type reactions. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between clinical and morphological aspects of PPD contact dermatitis and the T cell subsets predominance.

Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?  
Calogiuri G, Di LE, Butani L, Pizzimenti S, Incorvaia C, Macchia L, Nettis E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2017;158

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cypress pollinosis: from tree to clinic.
The Cupressaceae family covers all of the Earth's continents except for Antarctica, and it includes about 160 species. The most important taxa for allergic diseases belong to five different genera: Cupressus, Hesperocyparis, Juniperus, Cryptomeria, and Chamaecyparis. Cupressaceae species share a common pollen type that can even include the genus Taxus (Taxaceae) when this plant is also present. As Juniperus oxycedrus pollinates in October, Cupressus sempervirens in January and February, Hesperocyparis arizonica (prev. Cupressus arizonica) in February and March, and Juniperus communis in April, the symptomatic period is long-lasting. Due to global warming, the pollination period tends to last longer, and there is a trend for Cupressaceae bioclimate niches to migrate north. In Mediterranean areas, C. sempervirens (Italian cypress or Mediterranean cypress) is by far the most common pollinating species. It accounts for half of the total pollination level. The group 1 major allergens belong to the pectate-lyase family, and members share 70 to 97% sequence homology within the different Cupressaceae. Group 2 allergens correspond to the polygalacturonase protein family, while group 3, a minor allergen, belongs to the family of 'thaumatin-like proteins,' a pathogenesis-related protein 5. Group 4 allergens are Ca++-binding protein (4 EF-hands). Aside from these four groups, about 15 other allergens have been reported. Prominent among these is a basic low-molecular mass cross-reactive allergen that was identified recently, and which is suspected to be involved in pollen food syndromes which are common with peach and citrus. The prevalence of cypress allergy in the general population ranges from 0.6 to 3%, depending on the degree of exposure to the pollen. Depending on the geographic area and the studied population, 9 to 65% of outpatients consulting an allergist may have sensitization to cypress pollen. Repeated cross-sectional studies performed at different time intervals have demonstrated a threefold increase in the percentage of cypress allergy around the Mediterranean area. Concerning the clinical expression, rhinitis is the most prevalent symptom, while conjunctivitis is the most disabling. Pharmacological treatment of cypress allergies is not different from that of other seasonal allergies. Immunotherapy has proven effective and safe.

Cypress pollinosis: from tree to clinic.  
Charpin D, Pichot C, Belmonte J, Sutra JP, Zidkova J, Chanez P, Shahali Y, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 11;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by Chinese honeysuckle / Rangoon creeper
Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by Chinese honeysuckle / Rangoon creeper (Quisqualis indica (Combretum indicum))

Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by Quisqualis indica (Combretum indicum).  
Ngarmjiratam N, Wattanakrai P.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):313-314

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes.
Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (containing limonene hydroperoxides 0.33%) and oxidized linalool 6% (linalool hydroperoxides 1%) in petrolatum were tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Australia, Denmark, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Of 281 patients reacted to either oxidized R-limonene or oxidized linalool. Of these, 25% had concomitant reactions to both compounds, whereas 29% reacted only to oxidized R-limonene and 46% only to oxidized linalool. Of the 152 patients reacting to oxidized R-limonene, 46% reacted to oxidized linalool, whereas 35% of the 200 patients reacting to oxidized linalool also reacted to oxidized R-limonene. The majority of the patients (75%) reacted to only one of the oxidation mixtures, thus supporting the specificity of the reactions. The concomitant reactions to the two fragrance allergens suggest multiple sensitizations, which most likely reflect the exposure to the different fragrance materials in various types of consumer products.

Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes.  
Brared CJ, Karlberg AT, Andersen KE, Bruze M, Johansen JD, Garcia-Bravo B, Gimenez AA, Goh CL, Nixon R, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):273-280

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to essential oils cannot always be predicted from allergy to fragrance markers in the baseline series.
A small number of patients who are allergic to essential oils could be missed if these are not specifically tested. Labelling by INCI names means that exposure may not be obvious. Careful inspection of so-called 'natural' products and targeted testing is recommended

Contact allergy to essential oils cannot always be predicted from allergy to fragrance markers in the baseline series.  
Sabroe RA, Holden CR, Gawkrodger DJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):236-241

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy resulting from the use of acrylate nails is increasing in both users and those who are occupationally exposed.
Contact allergy resulting from the use of acrylate nails is increasing in both users and those who are occupationally exposed.

Contact allergy resulting from the use of acrylate nails is increasing in both users and those who are occupationally exposed.  
Montgomery R, Stocks SJ, Wilkinson SM.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):120-122

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
High prevalence of contact allergy in adolescence: results from the population-based BAMSE birth cohort.
This study assessed the prevalence of allergy to common contact allergens in Swedish adolescents in the general population. The prevalence of contact allergy in adolescents is of almost the same high magnitude as in adults. Two thousand two hundred and eighty-five participants (88% of all 16-year follow-up participants) were patch tested; 15.3% had at least one positive reaction. Contact allergy was more common in girls than in boys (17.0% versus 13.4%, p = 0.018). Sensitization to nickel was most common (7.5%), followed by sensitization to fragrance mix I (2.1%) and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin (1.9%). Nickel allergy was more frequent in girls (9.8% versus 4.9%, p < 0.001). Solitary sensitization to cobalt was more common than co-sensitization to nickel and cobalt.

High prevalence of contact allergy in adolescence: results from the population-based BAMSE birth cohort.  
Lagrelius M, Wahlgren CF, Matura M, Kull I, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):44-51

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylisothiazolinone in selected consumer products in Belgium: Adding fuel to the fire?
Methylisothiazolinone (MI) contact allergy is severely affecting consumers with allergic contact dermatitis, owing to its presence in cosmetics, household detergents, and water-based paints, in particular. This study reports on the MI concentrations in such products marketed in Belgium, in order to verify the accuracy of labelling (when applicable) and compliance with EU regulations. Thirty cosmetics (18 leave-on and 12 rinse-off), eight detergents and four paints were analysed for MI by the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The analysed leave-on, and to a lesser extent the rinse-off, cosmetics, contained MI at concentrations far exceeding the permitted 100 ppm use concentration. Household detergents contained high concentrations of MI, and mislabelling occurred for both cosmetics and detergents. The (limited) data on paints are in line with the existing literature.

Methylisothiazolinone in selected consumer products in Belgium: Adding fuel to the fire?  
Aerts O, Meert H, Goossens A, Janssens S, Lambert J, Apers S.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):142-149

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.
Epoxy products are among the most common causes of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R) is the most important sensitizer in epoxy systems. This study describes patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy products. We found a total of 209 cases with occupational contact allergy to epoxy chemicals. The largest occupational groups were painters (n = 41), floor layers (n = 19), electrical industry workers (n = 19), tile setters (n = 16), and aircraft industry workers (n = 15). A total of 82% of the patients reacted to DGEBA-R. Diagnosis of the DGEBA-R-negative patients required testing with m-xylylenediamine, N,N'-tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin, N,N'-diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline, isophoronediamine, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, diethylenetriamine, and cresyl glycidyl ether. The hands/upper extremities were most commonly affected (69%), but facial symptoms were also frequent (60%).

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.  
alto-Korte K, Pesonen M, Suuronen K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):336-342

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational contact dermatitis caused by nickel in scratchcards.
Occupational contact dermatitis caused by nickel in scratchcards. A 22-year-old female was referred for what initially appeared as airborne facial dermatitis, which subsequently spread over the trunk and limbs. Dermatitis improved with topical corticosteroid treatment, and worsened during working periods. The patient was employed by the French national lottery, and she was in charge of manufacturing and packing scratchcards. The coating was supposed to only contain aluminium, but the dimethylglyoxime test performed on the coating gave a positive result. Patch tests, including the European baseline series, cosmetic series, and skincare products, gave negative results, except with nickel.

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by nickel in scratchcards.  
Freling E, Poreaux C, Valois A, Schmutz JL, Barbaud A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):371-372

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Self-reported adverse tattoo reactions: a New York City Central Park study.
We administered a survey about adverse tattoo reactions to 300 randomly selected tattooed people in Central Park, New York City. 31 (10.3%) reported experiencing an adverse tattoo reaction, 13 (4.3%) reported acute reactions, and 18 (6.0%) suffered from a chronic reaction involving a specific colour lasting for >4 months. Forty-four per cent of colour-specific reactions were to red ink, which was only slightly higher than the frequency of red ink in the sampled population (36%). Twenty-five per cent of chronic reactions were to black ink, which was less than expected based on the number of respondents with black tattoos (90.3%). Study participants with chronic, colour-specific reactions had more tattoo colours than those without reactions.

Self-reported adverse tattoo reactions: a New York City Central Park study.  
Brady BG, Gold H, Leger EA, Leger MC.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):91-99

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New insights into cockroach allergens.
This review addresses the most recent developments on cockroach allergen research in relation to allergic diseases, especially asthma. The number of allergens relevant to cockroach allergy has recently expanded considerably up to 12 groups. New X-ray crystal structures of allergens from groups 1, 2, and 5 revealed interesting features with implications for allergen standardization, sensitization, diagnosis, and therapy. Cockroach allergy is strongly associated with asthma particularly among children and young adults living in inner-city environments, posing challenges for disease control. Environmental interventions targeted at reducing cockroach allergen exposure have provided conflicting results. Immunotherapy may be a way to modify the natural history of cockroach allergy and decrease symptoms and asthma severity among sensitized and exposed individuals. The new information on cockroach allergens is important for the assessment of allergen markers of exposure and disease, and for the design of immunotherapy trials.

New insights into cockroach allergens.  
Pomes A, Mueller GA, Randall TA, Chapman MD, Arruda LK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Apr;17(4):25

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food labeling issues in patients with severe food allergies: solving a hamlet-like doubt.
We review the laws on labeling in the international community, the difficulties they pose to the food manufacturers to prepare the food labels and the methodologies to determine the concentration of potential allergens in foods. European Food Safety Authority and International Life Sciences Institute Europe are evaluating strategies to identify the threshold level of allergen that can trigger a reaction in individuals. The most used techniques to detect the presence of protein in food are Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polymerase chain reaction and real time polymerase chain reaction. Researchers are now trying to apply proteomics to estimate the amount of protein within the food.In order to protect the health of consumers, the Codex Alimentarius Commission updates constantly the list of allergens. In response to these regulations, some industries have also added some precautionary allergen labeling (PAL). It was generally agreed that PAL statements needed to be visible, simple, and safe. It was suggested that PAL be standardized, an action that would occur if the 'Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labelling' process was made mandatory.

Summary: So far, no laboratory technique is able to reassure the consumers about the composition of foods found on the packaging. International authorities produced increasingly stringent laws, but more is still to do

Food labeling issues in patients with severe food allergies: solving a hamlet-like doubt.  
Fierro V, Di GF, Marzano V, Dahdah L, Mennini M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Apr 11;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Essential Oils, Part I: Introduction.
Essential oils are widely used in the flavor, food, fragrance, and cosmetic industries in many applications. Contact allergy to them is well known and has been described for 80 essential oils. The relevance of positive patch test reactions often remains unknown. Knowledge of the chemical composition of essential oils among dermatologists is suspected to be limited, as such data are published in journals not read by the dermatological community. Therefore, the authors have fully reviewed and published the literature on contact allergy to and chemical composition of essential oils. Selected topics from this publication will be presented in abbreviated form in Dermatitis starting with this issue, including I. Introduction; II. General aspects; III. Chemistry; IV. General aspects of contact allergy; V. Peppermint oil, lavender oil and lemongrass oil; VI: Sandalwood oil, ylang-ylang oil, and jasmine absolute

Essential Oils, Part I: Introduction.  
de Groot AC, Schmidt E.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):39-42

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What is the relevance of contact allergy to sodium metabisulfite and which concentration of the allergen should we use?
The prevalence of contact allergy to sodium metabisulfite (SMB) has increased from the range of 1.4% to 1.7% to the range of 3.4% to 6.8% in published series over the past 20 years. This study were to review contact allergy to SMB in our cohort and to investigate different concentrations to define the most appropriate concentration for patch testing.

What is the relevance of contact allergy to sodium metabisulfite and which concentration of the allergen should we use?  
Ralph N, Verma S, Merry S, Lally A, Kirby B, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):162-165

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational protein contact dermatitis.
Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

Occupational protein contact dermatitis.  
Barbaud A, Poreaux C, Penven E, Waton J.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Nov;25(6):527-534

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin diseases in musicians.
Instrumental musicians are a risk group for skin diseases. A systematic review was performed on Pubmed database and in the musical literature. Most publications on dermatoses in musicians are case reports. The exact prevalence of skin diseases in musicians is unknown but high rates have been reported. The most at-risk musicians are percussionists, string and wind instrumentalists. Repeated physical trauma is a frequent cause of skin conditions in musicians (callosities, fiddler's neck syndrome...). The allergens most often reported in musicians' allergic contact dermatitis are metals (nickel, dichromate), exotic woods and cane reed components, colophony and propolis. The key preventive measures are early management of the skin disease, specific tests and avoidance of the causative allergens, together with better adjustment of playing techniques to reduce trauma.

Skin diseases in musicians.  
Crepy MN.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Sep;25(5):375-383

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Adverse reactions to biologic therapy.
Biologic therapies are emerging as a significant therapeutic option for many with debilitating inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. As expansion in the number of FDA-approved agents continue to be seen, more unanticipated adverse reactions are likely to occur. Currently, the diagnostic tools, including skin testing and in vitro testing, to evaluate for immediate hypersensitivity reactions are insufficient. In this review, management strategies for common acute infusion reactions, injection site reactions, and immediate reactions suggestive of IgE-mediated mechanisms are discussed. Desensitization can be considered for reactions suggestive of IgE-mediated mechanisms, but allergists/immunologists should be involved in managing these patients

Adverse reactions to biologic therapy.  
Patel SV, Khan DA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 May;37(2):397-412

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of thermal processing on mealworm allergenicity.
Fresh mealworm was heat processed and extracted by a sequential extraction method using in succession Tris, urea, and a combined SDS/DTT buffer. Extracts were tested using immunoblot, basophil activation test and skin prick test in 15 shrimp allergic patients, previously indicated as population at risk for mealworm allergy. Immunoblots showed a difference in IgE binding between processed and unprocessed mealworm extracts. However, this was due to change in solubility. Some allergens were soluble in urea buffer, but became more soluble in Tris buffer and vice versa. IgE binding was seen for all extracts in blot and basophil activation test. The results from 13 skin prick tests showed a skin reaction similar between processed and unprocessed mealworm.

Effect of thermal processing on mealworm allergenicity.  
Broekman H, Knulst A, den Hartog JS, Monteleone F, Gaspari M, de JG, Houben G, Verhoeckx K.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2015 Sep;59(9):1855-1864

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prediction of cashew nut allergy in sensitised children.
As an alternative to the costly, time-consuming and possibly stressful double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge (DBPCFC) test, a model to predict the risk of cashew nut allergy was studied incorporating patient characteristics, standard diagnostic parameters (specific IgE (sIgE) and Skin Prick Test (SPT)) as well as component resolved diagnosis (CRD). In situations where there is limited availability of double -blind testing, the use of the model and scoring system presented here may be useful for identifying children who have = 9 7 % chance of having a positive challenge test result and in whom such testing is thus less likely to influence management. n our present series, this pertains to a substantial number of patients ( 71, 41%) The specificity of the scoring system may be negatively influenced by several factors, including cross -reacting allergens. Currently there is no data on allergens cross -reacting with cashew nut e.g. PR -10 allergens. More research in this area is needed.

Prediction of cashew nut allergy in sensitised children.  
van der Valk JPM, Vergouwe Y, Gerth van Wijk R, Steyerberg EW, Reitsma M, Wichers HJ, Savelkoul HFJ, Vlieg-Boerstra B, de Groot H, Dubois AEJ, de Jong NW.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Excipients in oral antihistamines can perpetuate allergic contact dermatitis.
Propylene glycol is a well-documented causative agent of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). It is also reported to cause systemic dermatitis after ingestion of foods or medicines containing it and after intravenous injection of a medicine with propylene glycol in its base. We describe two adolescents with sensitivity to propylene glycol confirmed by patch testing whose dermatitis improved dramatically after cessation of oral antihistamines containing propylene glycol. We report these cases to alert providers to the potential for worsening of ACD due to systemic exposure to propylene glycol in patients with a cutaneous sensitivity to the allergen

Excipients in oral antihistamines can perpetuate allergic contact dermatitis.  
Tocci EM, Robinson A, Belazarian L, Foley E, Wiss K, Silvestri DL.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Nov;32(6):e242-e244

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Is patch testing with food additives useful in children with atopic eczema?
Although food additives have been accused of worsening atopic eczema symptoms, according to recent studies the role of food additives in atopic eczema remains unclear. The purpose of our study was to investigate food additive hypersensitivity in a group of children with atopic eczema by using standardized atopy patch testing and to determine the role of food additive hypersensitivity in atopic eczema. Positive atopy patch test results were significantly higher in the atopic eczema group. Forty-one percent of the atopic eczema group (n = 14) and 15.2% (n = 5) of the control group had positive atopy patch test results with food additives. Carmine hypersensitivity and the consumption of foods containing carmine, such as gumdrops, salami, and sausage, were significantly higher in the children with atopic eczema.

Is patch testing with food additives useful in children with atopic eczema?  
Catli G, Bostanci I, Ozmen S, Dibek ME, Duman H, Ertan U.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Sep;32(5):684-689

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Surgery-related contact dermatitis: a review of potential irritants and allergens.
Surgical procedures utilize an increasing number of medical products including antiseptics, anesthetics, gloves, suture materials, tissue adhesives, topical antibiotics, and bandages. Many of these products have irritant potential. Allergic contact dermatitis has also been reported. This review covers preoperative, operative, and postoperative exposures that may result in contact dermatitis. Testing with standard patch panels such as T.R.U.E. Test and the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 65 allergen series does not evaluate for all relevant contactants. A thorough understanding of potential exposures is vital to effectively evaluate a patient with surgery-related contact dermatitis. A systematic approach is needed to ensure that standard patch panels and supplementary patches adequately address each encountered contactant

Surgery-related contact dermatitis: a review of potential irritants and allergens.  
Cook KA, Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Apr 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Purification and characterization of protamine, the allergen from the milt of Large Yellow Croaker
The protamine in fish milt can cause anaphylaxis in humans. To determine the allergen in the milt of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea), crude extracts were incubated with sera from allergic patients. The results showed that a 12 kDa multicomponent protein was the major allergen in the milt of large yellow croaker. The purified multicomponent protein was highly stable in acid-alkali conditions, and weakly retained immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding activity at high temperatures. It had six components, and component 5 had the strongest IgE-binding activity with patient sera. The protamines from different fish were found to have a similar secondary structure, although their components were different.

Purification and characterization of protamine, the allergen from the milt of Large Yellow Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea), and Its components.  
Liu YY, Chen XF, Hu JW, Chen ZW, Zhang LJ, Cao MJ, Liu GM.
J Agric Food Chem 2016 Mar 9;64(9):1999-2011

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Enzymatic hydrolysis does not reduce the biological reactivity of soybean proteins for all allergic subjects.
Many soybean protein products are processed by enzymatic hydrolysis to attain desirable functional food properties or in some cases to reduce allergenicity. However, few studies have investigated the effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on the allergenicity of soybean products. In this study the allergenicity of soybean protein isolates (SPI) hydrolyzed by Alcalase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, bromelain, or papain was evaluated by IgE immunoblots using eight soybean-allergic patient sera. Results indicated that hydrolysis of SPI by the enzymes did not reduce the allergenicity, and hydrolysis by chymotrypsin or bromelain has the potential to increase the allergenicity of SPI. Analysis of the chymotrypsin-hydrolyzed samples indicated fragments of beta-conglycinin protein are responsible for the apparent higher allergenic potential of digested SPI.

Enzymatic hydrolysis does not reduce the biological reactivity of soybean proteins for all allergic subjects.  
Panda R, Tetteh AO, Pramod SN, Goodman RE.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Nov 4;63(43):9629-9639

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oils
The risks related to the use of essential oils are difficult to ascertain at present, due in part to the large number of different oils available on the market, making it difficult for the risk assessor. Essential oils may contain skin allergens in significant amounts, and could thus pose a risk to the consumer. The aim of our study was to collect as much qualitative and quantitative data as possible on allergens present in essential oils. 11 types of essential oils, with 25 respective subspecies, were taken into account based on a previous survey. Based on the literature, 517 dosages were recorded from 112 publications, providing precious information for probabilistic exposure assessment purposes. 22 substances recognized as established allergens were found in the essential oils we included. Of these, 11 are also found in cosmetics as fragrance components. These results are of major importance regarding co-exposure to fragrance allergens. Moreover, this could lead to regulatory measures for essential oils in the future, as it is the case for cosmetic products, in order to better protect consumers against skin allergy

Qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oils: A literature-based database on contact allergens used for safety assessment.  
Dornic N, Ficheux AS, Roudot AC.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Oct;80226-232

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.
To solve the future food insecurity problem, alternative and sustainable protein sources (e.g. insects, rapeseed, fava bean and algae) are now being explored for the production of food and feed. To approve these novel protein sources for future food a comprehensive risk assessment is needed according to the European food legislation. Allergenicity risk assessment might pose some major difficulties, since detailed guidance on how to assess the allergenic potential of novel foods is not available. At present, the approach relies mostly on the guidance of allergenicity assessment for genetically modified (GM) plant foods. The most recent one was proposed by EFSA (2010 and 2011); 'weight-of-evidence approach'. However this guidance is difficult to interpret, not completely applicable or validated for novel foods and therefore needs some adjustments. In this paper we propose a conceptual strategy which is based on the 'weight-of-evidence approach' for food derived from GM plants and other strategies that were previously published in the literature. This strategy will give more guidance on how to assess the allergenicity of novel food proteins and protein sources

Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.  
Verhoeckx K, Broekman H, Knulst A, Houben G.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Aug;79118-124

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Consumer safety
The information provided does not support the safe use of MI as a preservative in rinse-off cosmetic products up to a concentration limit of 100 ppm from the view of induction of contact allergy. For rinse-off cosmetic products, a concentration of 15 ppm (0.0015%) MI is considered safe for the consumer from the point of view of induction of contact allergy. The information provided does not support the safe use of MI as a preservative in leave-on hair cosmetic products up to a concentration limit of 100 ppm from the point of view of induction of contact allergy. The concerns and opinions raised in SCCS Opinion SCCS/1521/13 (12 December 2013 with revision 27 March 2014) remain. The results of the recent Scandinavian study do not support safety of MI in rinse-off products at either 100 ppm or at 50 ppm for elicitation or induction

Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Consumer safety (SCCS) - Opinion on the safety of the use of Methylisothiazolinone (MI) (P94), in cosmetic products (sensitisation only).  
Scientific Committee Of Consumer Safety-Sccs, Gimenez-Arnau AM.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Apr;76211-212

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Revision of the opinion on peanut oil - Sensitisation only.
There is no known safe threshold currently defined at which the skin of peanut allergic subjects can safely be exposed to peanut proteins, although such thresholds are available for oral intake. The SCCS (Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety) has followed the scientific debate about the importance of skin exposure as a route for induction of sensitisation to type I allergens such as peanut. The SCCS acknowledges that this is of concern, but that there are insufficient data to define a safe level of skin exposure in the non-sensitised population. However, in view of the documented safe levels of oral intake of peanut protein in sensitised individuals and in view of the industry's capability to refine peanut oil below a protein level of 0.5 ppm, the SCCS can accept this value as maximum allowable concentration in (refined) peanut oil for cosmetic use.

Revision of the opinion on peanut oil - Sensitisation only.  
Coenraads PJ.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Nov;73(2):667

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Skin eruption elicited by magnesium oxide (Maglax((R)) ).  
Sakanoue M, Sanada J, Kanekura T.
J Dermatol 2016 Feb;43(2):221-222

Case of photosensitivity caused by fenofibrate after photosensitization to ketoprofen.  
Kuwatsuka S, Kuwatsuka Y, Takenaka M, Utani A.
J Dermatol 2016 Feb;43(2):224-225

Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.  
Watanabe H, Kamiyama T, Sasaki S, Kobayashi K, Fukuda K, Miyake Y, Aruga T, Sueki H.
J Dermatol 2016 Mar;43(3):321-324
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Case of anaphylactic reaction to soy following percutaneous sensitization by soy-based ingredients in cosmetic products.  
Yagami A, Suzuki K, Nakamura M, Sano A, Iwata Y, Kobayashi T, Suzuki M, Hara K, Teshima R, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2015 Sep;42(9):917-918

Immediate allergy due to raw garlic (Allium sativum L.).  
Yagami A, Suzuki K, Sano A, Iwata Y, Arima M, Moriyama T, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2015 Oct;42(10):1026-1027

Case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to Japanese apricot and peach: Detection of causative antigens.  
Iijima S, Ito M, Makabe K, Murakami Y, Yokooji T, Matsuo H.
J Dermatol 2015 Sep;42(9):916-917

Optimal evaluation time point for patch testing to predict skin irritation of commercial topical drugs.  
Horita K, Tomita C, Yasoshima M, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2015 Sep;42(9):851-860
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Malassezia species and their associated skin diseases.  
Harada K, Saito M, Sugita T, Tsuboi R.
J Dermatol 2015 Mar;42(3):250-257
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Guide for medical professionals (i.e., dermatologists) for the management of Rhododenol-induced leukoderma.  
Nishigori C, Aoyama Y, Ito A, Suzuki K, Suzuki T, Tanemura A, Ito M, Katayama I, Oiso N, Kagohashi Y, Sugiura S, Fukai K, Funasaka Y, Yamashita T, Matsunaga K.
J Dermatol 2015 Feb;42(2):113-128
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Risk assessment for nickel contact allergy.  
Boonchai W, Chaiwanon O, Kasemsarn P.
J Dermatol 2014 Dec;41(12):1065-1068
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Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by oral prednisolone.  
Ishii S, Hasegawa T, Hirasawa Y, Tsunemi Y, Kawashima M, Ikeda S.
J Dermatol 2014 Dec;41(12):1135-1136

Periorbital allergic contact dermatitis caused by lanolin in a lubricating eye ointment.  
Higgins CL, Nixon RL.
Australas J Dermatol 2016 Feb;57(1):68-69

Allergic contact dermatitis following epoxy resin exposure to a paint in a recreational setting.  
Lolatgis HA, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Nov;56(4):312-313

Allergic contact dermatitis to topical brimonidine.  
Rajagopalan A, Rajagopalan B.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Aug;56(3):235

Iododerma in pregnancy secondary to iodinated multivitamins.  
Torkamani N, Sinclair R.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Aug;56(3):235-236

Adverse effects of topical corticosteroids in paediatric eczema: Australasian consensus statement.  
Mooney E, Rademaker M, Dailey R, Daniel BS, Drummond C, Fischer G, Foster R, Grills C, Halbert A, Hill S, King E, Leins E, Morgan V, Phillips RJ, Relic J, Rodrigues M, Scardamaglia L, Smith.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Nov;56(4):241-251
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The rising trend in allergic contact dermatitis to acrylic nail products.  
Le Q, Cahill J, Palmer-Le A, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Aug;56(3):221-223
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Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to chromium from cement: Estimating the size of the problem in Australia.  
Wong CC, Gamboni SE, Palmer AM, Nixon RL.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Nov;56(4):290-293
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Cutaneous drug toxicity from 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP): Case report and histological description.  
Le P, Wood B, Kumarasinghe SP.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Nov;56(4):307-309
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Allergic contact dermatitis to para-phenylenediamine.  
Jenkins D, Chow ET.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Feb;56(1):40-43
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Unsuspected allergic contact dermatitis to alcohol swabs following neurosurgery.  
Lai-Kwon J, Ly L, Su JC, Nixon R, Tam MM.
Australas J Dermatol 2014 Nov;55(4):296-298
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Polysensitisation in a laboratory scientist associated with allergic contact dermatitis from methylisothiazolinone in skin cleansers.  
Palmer MJ, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2015 Feb;56(1):56-58
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Hand dermatitis in construction workers: a lesson in genetic epidemiology.  
Brown SJ.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Feb;174(2):263-265

Continuous usage of a hair dye product containing 2-methoxymethyl-para-phenylenediamine by hair-dye-allergic individuals.  
Kock M, Coenraads PJ, Blomeke B, Goebel C.
Br J Dermatol 2016 May;174(5):1042-1050
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Glove-related hand urticaria: an increasing occupational problem among healthcare workers.  
Hawkey S, Abdul GS.
Br J Dermatol 2016 May;174(5):1137-1140

Colophony as a marker for fragrance allergy in the general European population.  
Diepgen TL, Ofenloch R, Bruze M, Cazzaniga S, Coenraads PJ, Elsner P, Goncalo M, Svensson A, Naldi L.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Mar;174(3):695-696

Skincare products containing low concentrations of formaldehyde detected by the chromotropic acid method cannot be safely used in formaldehyde-allergic patients.  
Hauksson I, Ponten A, Gruvberger B, Isaksson M, Engfeldt M, Bruze M.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Feb;174(2):371-379
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Vemurafenib-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis: possible cross-reactivity with other sulfonamide compounds.  
Bellon T, Lerma V, Gonzalez-Valle O, Gonzalez HC, de Abajo FJ.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Mar;174(3):621-624
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Prevalence of contact allergy in the general population in different European regions.  
Diepgen TL, Ofenloch RF, Bruze M, Bertuccio P, Cazzaniga S, Coenraads PJ, Elsner P, Goncalo M, Svensson A, Naldi L.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Feb;174(2):319-329
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Prevalence of fragrance contact allergy in the general population of five European countries: a cross-sectional study.  
Diepgen TL, Ofenloch R, Bruze M, Cazzaniga S, Coenraads PJ, Elsner P, Goncalo M, Svensson A, Naldi L.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Dec;173(6):1411-1419
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Indoor dermatitis due to Aeroglyphus robustus.  
Stingeni L, Bianchi L, Tramontana M, Moretta I, Principato MA.
Br J Dermatol 2016 Feb;174(2):454-456

Occupational contact urticaria: lessons from the French National Network for Occupational Disease Vigilance and Prevention (RNV3P).  
sefa-Colas L, Telle-Lamberton M, Faye S, Bourrain JL, Crepy MN, Lasfargues G, Choudat D, Momas I.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Dec;173(6):1453-1461
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Fish-collagen allergy: a pitfall of the prick-to-prick test with raw fish.  
Chikazawa S, Hashimoto T, Kobayashi Y, Satoh T.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Nov;173(5):1330-1331

Cutaneous toxicities associated with vemurafenib therapy in 107 patients with BRAF V600E mutation-positive metastatic melanoma, including recognition and management of rare presentations.  
Sinha R, Larkin J, Gore M, Fearfield L.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Oct;173(4):1024-1031
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Late onset perforating folliculitis induced by lenalidomide: a case report.  
Kuiper EM, Kardaun SH.
Br J Dermatol 2015 Aug;173(2):618-620

Lichenoid Drug Eruption Caused by Limaprost Alfadex.  
Inoue A, Sawada Y, Ohmori S, Omoto D, Haruyama S, Yoshioka M, Nishio D, Nakamura M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Nov 2;96(7):997-998
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Cutaneous Adverse Reaction to Mogamulizumab May Indicate Favourable Prognosis in Adult T-cell Leukaemia-lymphoma.  
Yonekura K, Tokunaga M, Kawakami N, Takeda K, Kanzaki T, Nakano N, Kubota A, Takeuchi S, Takatsuka Y, Seto M, Utsunomiya A.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Nov 2;96(7):1000-1002
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Symmetrical Intertriginous and Flexural Exanthema due to Bortezomib (a Proteasome Inhibitor) Given for Myeloma.  
Malissen N, Bourrain JL, Chiriac A, Montet A, Vincent L, Dereure O, Du-Thanh A.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Nov 2;96(7):995-996
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Cold contact urticaria following vaccination: four cases.  
Raison-Peyron N, Philibert C, Bernard N, Du-Thanh A, Barbaud A, Bessis D.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Aug 23;96(6):852-853
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Photoallergic drug eruption caused by certolizumab pegol.  
Inoue A, Sawada Y, Ohmori S, Omoto D, Haruyama S, Kabashima-Kubo R, Yoshioka M, Nisio D, Nakamura M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jun 15;96(5):710-711
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Patch testing with main sensitizers does not detect all cases of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil.  
Hagvall L, Christensson JB.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jun 15;96(5):679-683
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Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers: A Retrospective Matched Case-control Study.  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Sommerlund M, Andersen KE, Mortz CG, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Feb;96(2):237-240
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Lichen Planus Possibly Induced by Acyclovir in a Child.  
Alani A, Sadlier M, Ahmad K.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Feb;96(2):266-267

High Frequency of Severe Telaprevir-associated Skin Eruptions in Clinical Practice.  
Carrascosa R, Capusan TM, Llamas-Velasco M, Garcia-Buey L, Gordillo C, Sanchez-Perez J.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jan;96(1):97-99
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Chromium Dermatitis in a Metal Worker Due to Leather Gloves and Alkaline Coolant.  
Hedberg YS, Liden C, Lindberg M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jan;96(1):104-105

Tetrazepam Allergy: A Case Series of Cutaneous Adverse Events.  
Huseynov I, Wirtz M, Hunzelmann N.
Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Jan;96(1):110-111

High serum total IgE predicts poor long-term outcome in atopic dermatitis.  
Kiiski V, Karlsson O, Remitz A, Reitamo S.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Nov;95(8):943-947
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Drug eruption following high-calorie infusion: a possible systemic type IV allergic reaction to sulphites.  
Honda T, Kitoh A, Miyachi Y, Kabashima K.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Sep;95(7):854-855

Swedish Experiences From Patch Testing Methylisothiazolinone Separately.  
Engfeldt M, Brared-Christensson J, Isaksson M, Matura M, Ryberg K, Stenberg B, Svedman C, Bruze M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Jul;95(6):717-719
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Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real?  
Girbovan A, Sur G, Samasca G, Lupan I.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Apr 11;
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Patch testing in patients with recurrent vesicular hand eczema.  
Tamagawa-Mineoka R, Nakamura N, Ueda S, Masuda K, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2017 Apr 2;

Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in Japan in the past 10 years based on data from the relief system of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency.  
Kinoshita Y, Saeki H, Asahina A, Ochiai T, Iijima M.
Allergol Int 2017 Apr;66(2):363-365

Optimal step doses for drug provocation tests to prove beta-lactam hypersensitivity.  
Chiriac AM, Rerkpattanapipat T, Bousquet PJ, Molinari N, Demoly P.
Allergy 2017 Apr;72(4):552-561
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Eruptive keratoacanthomas and leflunomide. [French]  
Schmutz JL.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Apr;143(4):330-331

Serious cutaneous reactions to galantamine hydrobromide (Reminyl(R) and generics). [French]  
Schmutz JL.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Mar;143(3):245-246

Fixed drug eruption secondary due to griseofulvin. [French]  
Diabate A, Aka RB, Kaloga M, Vagamon B, Kourouma HS, Gue I.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Mar;143(3):223-224

Severe cutaneous drug reactions to misused griseofulvin: 2 cases. [French]  
Le GA, Kerrad I, Oehler E.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Mar;143(3):219-222
Click to view abstract

Lethal Lyell's syndrome induced by fusidic acid. [French]  
Cluzel C, Pralong P, Logerot S, Sabatier-Vincent M, Tardieu M, Pinel N, Leccia MT.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Mar;143(3):215-218
Click to view abstract

No increased risk of cancer under pimecrolimus. [French]  
Schmutz JL.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2016 Jan;143(1):98-99

Localized salt-dependent aquagenic urticaria: A case report. [French]  
Margerin F, Wettle C, Merklen-Djafri C, Cribier B.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2015 Dec;142(12):771-775
Click to view abstract

Persistent reaction to minoxidil skin patch testing mimicking pseudolymphoma. [French]  
Schmutz JL.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2015 Nov;142(11):724-725

Fixed drug eruption induced by leuprorelin. [French]  
de Salins CA, Kupfer-Bessaguet I, Fleuret C, Staroz F, Plantin P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2015 Dec;142(12):780-781

Allergens involved in the cross-reactivity of Aedes aegypti with other arthropods.  
Cantillo JF, Puerta L, Lafosse-Marin S, Subiza JL, Caraballo L, Fernandez-Caldas E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr 20;
Click to view abstract

An analysis of anaphylaxis cases at a single pediatric emergency department during a 1-year period.  
Wright CD, Longjohn M, Lieberman PL, Lieberman JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):461-464
Click to view abstract

A systematic review of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome from the last 40 years.  
Manti S, Leonardi S, Salpietro A, Del CG, Salpietro C, Cuppari C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):411-418
Click to view abstract

Mammalian milk allergy: case presentation and review of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment.  
Pham MN, Wang J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):406-410

Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity.  
Cui C, Basen T, Philipp AT, Yusin J, Krishnaswamy G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):389-393

Preventing food allergies with tweaks to the infant diet: A practical reality?  
Wang J, Groetch M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Apr;118(4):385-388

Incidence of adverse cutaneous drug reactions in 22,866 Chinese inpatients: a prospective study.  
Tian XY, Liu B, Shi H, Zhao ZR, Zhou XP, Zhang T, Sun QN, Zuo YG.
Arch Dermatol Res 2015 Nov;307(9):829-834
Click to view abstract

Erratum Figure Correction: Aeroallergen sensitization and allergic disease phenotypes in Asia.  

Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2017 Mar;35(1):66
Click to view abstract

Mosquito Allergy in Children: Clinical features and limitation of commercially-available diagnostic tests.  
Manuyakorn W, Itsaradisaikul S, Benjaponpitak S, Kamchaisatian W, Sasisakulporn C, Jotikasthira W, Matangkasombut P.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 1;
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnostics in Thai children with cow's milk and egg allergy.  
Jessadapakorn W, Sangsupawanich P, Wootipoom N, Suddeaugrai O, Yuenyongviwat A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 1;
Click to view abstract

Protocol for investigation of possible soya allergy in patients being considered for treatment with isotretinoin or alitretinoin.  
Alden K, Chowdhury MM, Williams PE, Kalavala M.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2016 Apr;41(3):326-327

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms/drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: clinical features of 27 patients.  
Avancini J, Maragno L, Santi CG, Criado PR.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2015 Dec;40(8):851-859
Click to view abstract

Cocktails and sunbeds: beware!.  
Eustace K, Azurdia RM.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2016 Mar;41(2):227-228

Chronic areolar dermatitis due to methylisothiazolinone-containing bodywash.  
Hamann CR, Brankov N, Hamann D, Hamann C.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2016 Jan;41(1):114-115

Interstitial granulomatous drug reaction induced by quetiapine.  
Tan ES, Robson A, Lai-Cheong JE, Wain EM.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2016 Mar;41(2):210-211

Chronic urticaria due to autoreactivity to progesterone.  
Wingate-Saul L, Rymer J, Greaves MW.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2015 Aug;40(6):644-646
Click to view abstract

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) secondary to imatinib in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia.  
Scott AD, Lee M, Kubba F, Chu A.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2015 Dec;40(8):926-927

A multicentre audit of cutaneous allergy (patch testing) services within Yorkshire, UK.  
Smith VM, Wilkinson SM.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2015 Dec;40(8):923-926

Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?  
Calogiuri G, Di LE, Butani L, Pizzimenti S, Incorvaia C, Macchia L, Nettis E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2017;158
Click to view abstract

Cypress pollinosis: from tree to clinic.  
Charpin D, Pichot C, Belmonte J, Sutra JP, Zidkova J, Chanez P, Shahali Y, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 11;
Click to view abstract

Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by Quisqualis indica (Combretum indicum).  
Ngarmjiratam N, Wattanakrai P.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):313-314

Resorcinol: a strong sensitizer but a rare contact allergen in the clinic.  
Darcis J, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):310-312

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the tea tree oil-containing hydrogel Burnshield(R).  
Storan ER, Nolan U, Kirby B.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):309-310

'Seborrhoeic dermatitis' of the head and neck without scalp involvement - remember nail varnish allergy.  
Pongpairoj K, Morar N, McFadden JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):306-307

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by heroin (diacetylmorphine) and morphine.  
Hvid L, Svendsen MT, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):301-302

Patch testing is clinically important for patients with peri-anal dermatoses and pruritus ani.  
bu-Asi MJ, White IR, McFadden JP, White JM.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):298-300

Anogenital allergic contact dermatitis caused by methylchloroisothiazolinone, methylisothiazolinone and topical clotrimazole with subsequent generalized exanthem triggered by oral fluconazole.  
Nasir S, Goldsmith P.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):296-297

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by insect repellent wipes.  
Corazza M, Virgili A, Bertoldi AM, Benetti S, Borghi A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):295-296

Severe reaction to emtricitabine and lamiduvine: evidence of cross-reactivity.  
Suarez-Lorenzo I, Castillo-Sainz R, Carden-Santana MA, Carrillo-Diaz T.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):253-254

Facial allergic contact dermatitis without hand involvement caused by disposable latex gloves.  
Higgins C, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):251-253

The many faces of coconut oil derivatives: occupational hand dermatitis caused by a liquid soap containing cocamidopropylamine oxide.  
Aerts O, van DF, van TW, Lambert J.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):248-251

Fragrance allergy could be missed without patch testing with 26 individual fragrance allergens.  
Vejanurug P, Tresukosol P, Sajjachareonpong P, Puangpet P.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):230-235
Click to view abstract

Level of use and safety of botanical products for itching vulvar dermatoses. Are patch tests useful?  
Corazza M, Virgili A, Toni G, Minghetti S, Tiengo S, Borghi A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):289-294
Click to view abstract

Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes.  
Brared CJ, Karlberg AT, Andersen KE, Bruze M, Johansen JD, Garcia-Bravo B, Gimenez AA, Goh CL, Nixon R, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):273-280
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to liquorice flavonoids: analysis with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.  
Kanoh H, Banno Y, Nakamura M, Seishima M.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):191-192

A case of contact urticaria syndrome stage 3 after honey ingestion, induced by epicutaneous sensitization during skin care with honey.  
Katayama M, Inomata N, Inagawa N, Fukuro S, Aihara M.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):189-191

Allergic contact cheilitis and hand dermatitis caused by a toothpaste.  
Van BA, Kerre S, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):187-189

A case of allergic contact cheilitis caused by propolis and honey.  
Nyman G, Hagvall L.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):186-187

Further evidence of thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) being a strong cosmetic sensitizer.  
Leysen J, Aerts O.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):182-184

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ethylhexylglycerin in both an ointment and a skin aerosol.  
Harries C, Muhlenbein S, Geier J, Pfutzner W.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):181-182

Ethylhexylglycerin: a low-risk, but highly relevant, sensitizer in 'hypo-allergenic' cosmetics.  
Aerts O, Verhulst L, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):281-288
Click to view abstract

The role of the antioxidant ascorbic acid in the elicitation of contact allergic reactions to p-phenylenediamine.  
Coenraads PJ, Vogel TA, Blomeke B, Goebel C, Roggeband R, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):267-272
Click to view abstract

Contact sensitizers in commercial hair dye products sold in Thailand.  
Boonchai W, Bunyavaree M, Winayanuwattikun W, Kasemsarn P.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):222-229
Click to view abstract

Determinants of epoxy allergy in the construction industry: a case-control study.  
Spee T, Timmerman JG, Ruhl R, Kersting K, Heederik DJ, Smit LA.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 May;74(5):259-266
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to essential oils cannot always be predicted from allergy to fragrance markers in the baseline series.  
Sabroe RA, Holden CR, Gawkrodger DJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):236-241
Click to view abstract

Cosmetic preservative labelling on the Thai market.  
Bunyavaree M, Kasemsarn P, Boonchai W.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):217-221
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by Mirvaso(R), brimonidine tartrate gel 0.33%, a new topical treatment for rosaceal erythema.  
Cookson H, McFadden J, White J, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):366-367

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by methylisothiazolinone in hair gel.  
Badaoui A, Bayrou O, Fite C, Frances C, Soria A, Pecquet C.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):364-366

PTBP-FR and TRUE Test(R).  
Hamann CP.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):128-129

Two unusual cases of allergic contact stomatitis caused by methacrylates.  
Venables ZC, Narayana K, Johnston GA.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):126-127

Sensitization to cyanoacrylates caused by prolonged exposure to a glucose sensor set in a diabetic child.  
Schwensen JF, Friis UF, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):124-125

Airborne allergic contact dermatitis caused by Apuleia leiocarpa in a parquet fitter.  
Lopez Lopez OF, Goday Bujan JJ, Del Pozo LJ, Fonseca CE.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):122-123

Contact allergy resulting from the use of acrylate nails is increasing in both users and those who are occupationally exposed.  
Montgomery R, Stocks SJ, Wilkinson SM.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):120-122

How should we advise patients with allergic contact dermatitis caused by (meth-)acrylates about future dental work?  
Wingfield Digby SS, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):116-117

Formaldehyde in cosmetics in patch tested dermatitis patients with and without contact allergy to formaldehyde.  
Hauksson I, Ponten A, Isaksson M, Hamada H, Engfeldt M, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Mar;74(3):145-151
Click to view abstract

Azathioprine does not influence patch test reactivity in Parthenium dermatitis.  
Verma KK, Bhari N, Sethuraman G.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):64-65

Discoid lupus triggered by allergic contact dermatitis caused by a hair dye.  
Van AE, Kerre S, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):61-64

Linear eczematous lesions caused by an allergen-contaminated skin marker: an iatrogenic complication of patch testing.  
Ozkaya E.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):58-60

Photosensitivity in atopic dermatitis complicated by contact allergy to common sunscreen ingredients.  
Simonsen AB, Koppelhus U, Sommerlund M, Deleuran M.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):56-58

Anaphylactic reaction to povidone in a skin antiseptic.  
Castelain F, Girardin P, Moumane L, Aubin F, Pelletier F.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):55-56

Polyhexamethylene biguanide in wound care products: a non-negligible cause of peri-ulcer dermatitis.  
Bervoets A, Aerts O.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):53-55

Two sensitizing oxidation products of p-phenylenediamine patch tested in patients allergic to p-phenylenediamine.  
Young E, Zimerson E, Bruze M, Svedman C.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):76-82
Click to view abstract

Water exposure--challenging differences between occupations.  
Meding B, Anveden B, Alderling M, Lindahl G, Wrangsjo K.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):22-28
Click to view abstract

Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride: analysis of patch test dose-response studies.  
Fischer LA, Johansen JD, Voelund A, Liden C, Julander A, Midander K, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):105-109
Click to view abstract

2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate - a coupler causing contact allergy from use in hair dyes.  
Madsen JT, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):102-104
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis in children: trends in allergens, 10 years on. A retrospective study of 500 children tested between 2005 and 2014 in one UK centre.  
Smith VM, Clark SM, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):37-43
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to chlorhexidine in a tertiary dermatology clinic in Denmark.  
Opstrup MS, Johansen JD, Zachariae C, Garvey LH.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):29-36
Click to view abstract

Anti-hapten antibodies in response to skin sensitization.  
Singleton H, Popple A, Gellatly N, Maxwell G, Williams J, Friedmann PS, Kimber I, Dearman RJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Apr;74(4):197-204
Click to view abstract

High prevalence of contact allergy in adolescence: results from the population-based BAMSE birth cohort.  
Lagrelius M, Wahlgren CF, Matura M, Kull I, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):44-51
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to reactive diluents and hardeners in epoxy resin systems. IVDK data 2002-2011. Part I: reaction frequencies.  
Geier J, Lessmann H, Hillen U, Skudlik C, Jappe U.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):83-93
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to reactive diluents and hardeners in epoxy resin systems. IVDK data 2002-2011. Part II: concomitant reactions.  
Geier J, Lessmann H, Hillen U, Skudlik C, Jappe U.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):94-101
Click to view abstract

ESSCA results with the baseline series, 2009-2012: rubber allergens.  
Warburton KL, Bauer A, Chowdhury MM, Cooper S, Krecisz B, Chomiczewska-Skora D, Kiec-Swierczynska M, Filon FL, Mahler V, Sanchez-Perez J, Schnuch A, Uter W, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):305-312
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis and nail damage mimicking psoriasis caused by nail hardeners.  
Mestach L, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):112-114

Reactivity to sorbitan sesquioleate affects reactivity to fragrance mix I.  
Geier J, Schnuch A, Lessmann H, Uter W.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):296-304
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane in a windscreen repairer.  
Pesonen M, Kuuliala O, alto-Korte K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):372-373

Methylisothiazolinone in selected consumer products in Belgium: Adding fuel to the fire?  
Aerts O, Meert H, Goossens A, Janssens S, Lambert J, Apers S.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):142-149
Click to view abstract

TRUE Test(R) and baseline series.  
Hamann C.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):259-260

Allergic perioral contact dermatitis caused by rubber chemicals during dental treatment.  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Hald M, Johansen JD, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Feb;74(2):110-111

Dihydroxydiphenyl - a historical rubber contact allergen?  
Frosch PJ, Mahler V, Uter W.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):377-380

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.  
alto-Korte K, Pesonen M, Suuronen K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):336-342
Click to view abstract

Jewellery: alloy composition and release of nickel, cobalt and lead assessed with the EU synthetic sweat method.  
Hamann D, Thyssen JP, Hamann CR, Hamann C, Menne T, Johansen JD, Spiewak R, Maibach H, Lundgren L, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):231-238
Click to view abstract

'Sign of the kiss' from black henna tattoos.  
Foss-Skiftesvik MH, Johansen JD, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):370-371

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by timolol with cross-sensitivity to levobunolol.  
Horcajada-Reales C, Rodriguez-Soria VJ, Suarez-Fernandez R.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):368-369

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by nickel in scratchcards.  
Freling E, Poreaux C, Valois A, Schmutz JL, Barbaud A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):371-372

Foot dermatitis caused by didecyldimethylammonium chloride in a shoe refresher spray.  
Mowitz M, Ponten A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):374-376

Failures in risk assessment and risk management for cosmetic preservatives in Europe and the impact on public health.  
Schwensen JF, White IR, Thyssen JP, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):133-141
Click to view abstract

Palpebral angioedema and allergic contact dermatitis caused by a cerumenolytic.  
Caralli ME, Seoane RM, Rojas Perez-Ezquerra P, Pelta FR, De Barrio FM.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):376-377

European Society of Contact Dermatitis guideline for diagnostic patch testing - recommendations on best practice.  
Johansen JD, alto-Korte K, Agner T, Andersen KE, Bircher A, Bruze M, Cannavo A, Gimenez-Arnau A, Goncalo M, Goossens A, John SM, Liden C, Lindberg M, Mahler V, Matura M, Rustemeyer T, Seru.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):195-221
Click to view abstract

Eucalyptus oil and tea tree oil.  
de Groot AC, Schmidt E.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):381-386

Contact sensitization to 34 common contact allergens in university students in Beijing.  
Zhao L, Li LF.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):323-324

Systemic sodium metabisulfite allergy.  
Cussans A, McFadden J, Ostlere L.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):316-317

Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings.  
Bregnbak D, Johansen JD, Jellesen MS, Zachariae C, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):261-280
Click to view abstract

Aquagenic urticaria recurring after epilation and contact with sea water.  
Gallo R, Campisi CS, Agnoletti AF, Parodi A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):313-314

A case of contact dermatitis caused by timolol in anti-glaucoma eyedrops.  
Otero-Rivas MM, Ruiz-Gonzalez I, Valladares-Narganes LM, gado-Vicente S, Rodriguez-Prieto MA.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):256-257

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by mepyramine in topical products.  
Winther AH, Andersen KE, Mortz CG.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):255-256

Contact sensitization to fragrances other than fragrance mix I in China.  
Liu J, Li LF.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):252-253

Persistent periorbital allergic contact dermatitis in a dental technician caused by airborne thiuram exposure.  
Schwensen JF, Menne T, Johansen JD, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Nov;73(5):321-322

Short and frequent skin contact with nickel.  
Erfani B, Liden C, Midander K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):222-230
Click to view abstract

Photopatch testing in Bogota (Colombia): 2011-2013.  
Valbuena Mesa MC, Hoyos Jimenez EV.
Contact Dermatitis 2016 Jan;74(1):11-17
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by essential oil of Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) on the periungual area.  
Kim M, Hwang SW, Cho BK, Park HJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):250-251

Patch test results with fragrance markers of the baseline series - analysis of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) network 2009-2012.  
Frosch PJ, Duus JJ, Schuttelaar ML, Silvestre JF, Sanchez-Perez J, Weisshaar E, Uter W.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):163-171
Click to view abstract

Patch testing with hair cosmetic series in Europe: a critical review and recommendation.  
Uter W, sefa-Colas L, Frosch P, Gimenez-Arnau A, John SM, Lepoittevin JP, Liden C, White IR, Duus JJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):69-81
Click to view abstract

Self-reported adverse tattoo reactions: a New York City Central Park study.  
Brady BG, Gold H, Leger EA, Leger MC.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):91-99
Click to view abstract

Clinical profile and quality of life of patients with occupational contact dermatitis from New Delhi, India.  
Bhatia R, Sharma VK, Ramam M, Sethuraman G, Yadav CP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):172-181
Click to view abstract

Immediate hypersensitivity caused by cetylpyridinium chloride in a throat spray.  
Shima K, Tanizaki H, Endo Y, Fujisawa A, Tanioka M, Miyachi Y, Kabashima K.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):248-249

Characteristics of patients patch tested in the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) network, 2009-2012.  
Uter W, Gefeller O, Gimenez-Arnau A, Frosch P, Duus JJ, Schuttelaar ML, Rustemeyer T, Larese FF, Dugonik A, Bircher A, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):82-90
Click to view abstract

Contact dermatitis caused by Tinosorb(R) M: the importance of pach testing with pure methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol.  
Liuti F, Borrego L.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):192-193

Contact dermatitis caused by efinaconazole solution for treatment of onychomycosis.  
Hirohata A, Hanafusa T, Mabuchi-Kiyohara E, Ikegami R.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):190-192

Contact dermatitis caused by brazilin in Caesalpinia sappan.  
Xu YY, Yin J.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):189-190

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by adapalene.  
Numata T, Jo R, Kobayashi Y, Tsuboi R, Okubo Y.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):187-188

Magnolia officinalis bark extract, a recently identified contact allergen in 'anti-ageing' cosmetics.  
Ghys K, De PA, Vandevenne A, Werbrouck J, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):130-132

C12-15 alkyl benzoate: a new cosmetic allergen?  
Werbrouck J, Lambrecht C, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Oct;73(4):249-250

Are all new allergens in TRUE Test(R) essential for a baseline set?  
Echechipia S, Villarreal O, Iriarte P, Garces M, Sala-Cunill A, Daschner A, Quinones MD, Ferrer M, Jauregui I, Veleiro B.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):186-187

Mango: pulp fiction?  
Kim AS, Christiansen SC.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):123-124

Allergic nickel dermatitis following an occupational accident involving a mechanical rodeo bull.  
Bregnbak D, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):129-130

Is p-tert-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin (PTBP-FR) in TRUE Test(R) (Mekos test) sensitizing the tested patients?  
Stenberg B, Bruze M, Zimerson E.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Dec;73(6):350-357
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ranitidine hydrochloride in a veterinary product.  
Meani R, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):125-126

Occupational hazards in diagnosing pigmented lesions: nickel release from hand-held tools.  
Lei U, Zachariae C, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Sep;73(3):194

Primin sensitization in north-eastern Italy: a temporal trend from 1996 to 2012.  
Bongiorni L, Prodi A, Rui F, Belloni FA, Corradin MT, Larese FF.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Aug;73(2):108-112
Click to view abstract

Primary Prevention of Food Allergy.  
Greenhawt MJ, Fleischer DM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Apr;17(4):26
Click to view abstract

New insights into cockroach allergens.  
Pomes A, Mueller GA, Randall TA, Chapman MD, Arruda LK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Apr;17(4):25
Click to view abstract

Non-immediate Cutaneous Reactions to Beta-Lactams: Approach to Diagnosis.  
Romano A, Valluzzi RL, Caruso C, Maggioletti M, Gaeta F.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Apr;17(4):23
Click to view abstract

Severe food allergies: can they be considered rare diseases?  
Fiocchi A, Ebisawa M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Apr 4;

Use of biologics in severe food allergies.  
Fiocchi A, Pecora V, Valluzzi RL, Fierro V, Mennini M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Apr 1;
Click to view abstract

Update on asthma and cleaning agents.  
Folletti I, Siracusa A, Paolocci G.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Apr;17(2):90-95
Click to view abstract

Concomitant sensitization to inhaled budesonide and oral nystatin presenting as allergic contact stomatitis and systemic allergic contact dermatitis.  
Vega F, Ramos T, Las HP, Blanco C.
Cutis 2016 Jan;97(1):24-27
Click to view abstract

Differentiation of latex allergy from irritant contact dermatitis.  
Burkhart C, Schloemer J, Zirwas M.
Cutis 2015 Dec;96(6):369-71, 401
Click to view abstract

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with ranolazine.  
Grelck K, Stewart N, Rosen L, Sukal S.
Cutis 2015 Oct;96(4):E18-E21
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact dermatitis from carbapenems.  
Colagiovanni A, Feliciani C, Fania L, Pascolini L, Buonomo A, Nucera E, Schiavino D.
Cutis 2015 Oct;96(4):E1-E3

Painful skin lesions on the hands following black henna application.  
Guo C, Sato R, Rothman I.
Cutis 2015 Sep;96(3):E5-E6

Severe Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Dermabond Prineo, a Topical Skin Adhesive of 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate Increasingly Used in Surgeries to Close Wounds.  
Davis MD, Stuart MJ.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):75-76

Sea Anemone: A Rare Case of Contact Dermatitis in Italy.  
Tammaro A, Pigliacelli F, D'Arino A, Persechino F, Parisella FR, Persechino S.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):73-75

When marking nut traveled to Washington, DC.  
Kubba A, Batrani M, Vadrevu R.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):72-73

Lidocaine Allergy: Do Positive Patch Results Restrict Future Use?  
Corbo MD, Weber E, DeKoven J.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):68-71
Click to view abstract

Lack of Association Between Dust Mite Sensitivity and Atopic Dermatitis.  
Silverberg JI, Hanifin JM, Law S, White K, Storrs FJ.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):59-67
Click to view abstract

Essential Oils, Part I: Introduction.  
de Groot AC, Schmidt E.
Dermatitis 2016 Mar;27(2):39-42
Click to view abstract

Almost Missed It! Photo-contact Allergy to Octocrylene in a Ketoprofen-sensitized Subject.  
Aerts O, Goossens A, Bervoets A, Lambert J.
Dermatitis 2016 Jan;27(1):33-34

Sensitization to Formaldehyde in Northeastern Italy, 1996 to 2012.  
Prodi A, Rui F, Belloni FA, Corradin MT, Larese FF.
Dermatitis 2016 Jan;27(1):21-25
Click to view abstract

Benzalkonium chloride: a known irritant and novel allergen.  
Wentworth AB, Yiannias JA, Davis MD, Killian JM.
Dermatitis 2016 Jan;27(1):14-20
Click to view abstract

Cobalt.  
Fowler JF.
Dermatitis 2016 Jan;27(1):3-8
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to surfactants in a hypoallergenic liquid cleanser.  
Hanson JL, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2015 Nov;26(6):284-286
Click to view abstract

Occupational Contact Dermatitis: Workers' Compensation Patch Test Results of Portland, Oregon, 2005-2014.  
Coman G, Zinsmeister C, Norris P.
Dermatitis 2015 Nov;26(6):276-283
Click to view abstract

Patch testing for metal allergy with manufacturer-supplied materials before nuss bar insertion.  
Heitmiller K, French A, Alaish SM, Goldner R, Gaspari AA.
Dermatitis 2015 Nov;26(6):271-275
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity to surfactants.  
Fowler JF, Shaughnessy CN, Belsito DV, DeKoven JG, Deleo VA, Fransway AF, Maibach HI, Marks JG, Mathias CG, Pratt M, Sasseville D, Taylor JS, Warshaw EM, Zirwas MJ, Zug KA, Lorenz D.
Dermatitis 2015 Nov;26(6):268-270
Click to view abstract

The Utility of Patch Testing Methylisothiazolinone 2000 ppm aqua.  
Milanesi N, Gola M, Francalanci S.
Dermatitis 2015 Sep;26(5):242

Systemic contact dermatitis due to flaxseed ingestion.  
Meyer MD, Watsky KL.
Dermatitis 2015 Sep;26(5):241

Protein contact dermatitis to pig semen.  
McFarland SL, Hylwa SA, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2015 Sep;26(5):239-240

New Contact Allergens: 2008 to 2015.  
de Groot AC.
Dermatitis 2015 Sep;26(5):199-215
Click to view abstract

Nickel allergy in adults in the U.S.: 1962 to 2015.  
Goldenberg A, Vassantachart J, Lin EJ, Lampel HP, Jacob SE.
Dermatitis 2015 Sep;26(5):216-223
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to nickel is characterized by a specific micro-RNA signature.  
Lovendorf MB, Dyring-Andersen B, Vennegaard MT, Clemmensen A, Bonefeld CM, Ropke MA, Skov L.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):195-196

Sensitivity to multiple benzophenone sunscreen agents.  
Hanson JL, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):192-194

Bullet dermatitis: a localized cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction.  
Raisch M, Lampel HP.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):190-191

Eyelid dermatitis as a manifestation of systemic contact dermatitis to cinnamon.  
Vandersall A, Katta R.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):189

Occupational dermatitis in health care workers evaluated for suspected allergic contact dermatitis.  
Kadivar S, Belsito DV.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):177-183
Click to view abstract

Patch testing to a textile dye mix by the international contact dermatitis research group.  
Isaksson M, Ale I, Andersen KE, Diepgen T, Goh CL, Goossens RA, Jerajani H, Maibach HI, Sasseville D, Bruze M.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):170-176
Click to view abstract

Methylisothiazolinone testing at 2000 ppm: a prevalent sensitizer for allergic contact dermatitis.  
Ham K, Posso-De Los Rios CJ, Gooderham M.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):166-169
Click to view abstract

What is the relevance of contact allergy to sodium metabisulfite and which concentration of the allergen should we use?  
Ralph N, Verma S, Merry S, Lally A, Kirby B, Collins P.
Dermatitis 2015 Jul;26(4):162-165
Click to view abstract

Three Cases of Bullous Pemphigoid Associated with Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors - One due to Linagliptin.  
Mendonca FM, Martin-Gutierrez FJ, Rios-Martin JJ, Camacho-Martinez F.
Dermatology 2016;232(2):249-253
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous adverse drug reactions with antimalarials and allergological skin tests.  
Soria A, Barbaud A, Assier H, venel-Audran M, Tetart F, Raison-Peyron N, Amarger S, Girardin P, Frances C.
Dermatology 2015;231(4):353-359
Click to view abstract

Sarcoidosis in Patients Treated with Vemurafenib for Metastatic Melanoma: A Paradoxical Autoimmune Activation.  
Lheure C, Kramkimel N, Franck N, Laurent-Roussel S, Carlotti A, Queant A, Goldwasser F, Avril MF, Dupin N.
Dermatology 2015;231(4):378-384
Click to view abstract

Early-Onset Vemurafenib-Induced DRESS Syndrome.  
Munch M, Peuvrel L, Brocard A, Saint JM, Khammari A, Dreno B, Quereux G.
Dermatology 2016;232(1):126-128
Click to view abstract

First case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by pitavastatin: possible pathogenetic role of IL-36.  
Saito-Sasaki N, Sawada Y, Ohmori S, Omoto D, Haruyama S, Yoshioka M, Nishio D, Nakamura M.
Eur J Dermatol 2016 Jan;26(1):106-107

Anakinra delayed skin allergy expressing as both injection site reactions and generalized exanthema.  
Lungoci ER, Hacard F, Nicolas JF, Berard F.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Sep;25(5):503-504

Contact allergy caused by methylisothiazolinone: the Belgian-French experience.  
Aerts O, Goossens A, Giordano-Labadie F.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 May;25(3):228-233
Click to view abstract

Anaphylactic shock after the ingestion of jellyfish without a history of jellyfish contact or sting.  
Okubo Y, Yoshida K, Furukawa M, Sasaki M, Sakakibara H, Terakawa T, Akasawa A.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Sep;25(5):491-492

Occupational protein contact dermatitis.  
Barbaud A, Poreaux C, Penven E, Waton J.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Nov;25(6):527-534
Click to view abstract

Allergic hypersensitivity to red meat induced by tick bites: a French case report.  
Guillier A, Fauconneau A, De BF, Guez S, Doutre MS.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 May;25(3):277

Skin diseases in musicians.  
Crepy MN.
Eur J Dermatol 2015 Sep;25(5):375-383
Click to view abstract

Adverse reactions to biologic therapy.  
Patel SV, Khan DA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 May;37(2):397-412
Click to view abstract

Risk factors for severe reactions during double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges.  
Yanagida N, Sato S, Asaumi T, Ogura K, Ebisawa M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 6;172(3):173-182
Click to view abstract

Prediction of cashew nut allergy in sensitised children.  
van der Valk JPM, Vergouwe Y, Gerth van Wijk R, Steyerberg EW, Reitsma M, Wichers HJ, Savelkoul HFJ, Vlieg-Boerstra B, de Groot H, Dubois AEJ, de Jong NW.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Apr 19;
Click to view abstract

The 'Jewelry Addict': Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Repetitive Multiple Children's Jewelry Exposures.  
Silverberg NB.
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Mar;33(2):e103-e105
Click to view abstract

Benzoate allergy in children--from foods to personal hygiene products.  
Jacob SE, Hill H, Lucero H, Nedorost S.
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Mar;33(2):213-215
Click to view abstract

The 'Heart Sign': An Early Indicator of Dose-Dependent Doxycycline-Induced Phototoxicity.  
Nguyen TA, Krakowski AC.
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Mar;33(2):e69-e71
Click to view abstract

'Mint' Condition: Contact Dermatitis in an Adolescent Numismatist.  
Cotton CH, Admani SE, Jacob SE, Krakowski AC.
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Jan;33(1):80-83
Click to view abstract

Excipients in oral antihistamines can perpetuate allergic contact dermatitis.  
Tocci EM, Robinson A, Belazarian L, Foley E, Wiss K, Silvestri DL.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Nov;32(6):e242-e244
Click to view abstract

Dermestid Dermatitis in a 2-Year-Old Girl: Case Report and Review of the Literature.  
Hoverson K, Wohltmann WE, Pollack RJ, Schissel DJ.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Nov;32(6):e228-e233
Click to view abstract

Nickel allergy and our children's health: a review of indexed cases and a view of future prevention.  
Jacob SE, Goldenberg A, Pelletier JL, Fonacier LS, Usatine R, Silverberg N.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Nov;32(6):779-785
Click to view abstract

Religious allergic contact dermatitis.  
Goldenberg A, Matiz C, Eichenfield LF.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Jul;32(4):e191-e192
Click to view abstract

Is patch testing with food additives useful in children with atopic eczema?  
Catli G, Bostanci I, Ozmen S, Dibek ME, Duman H, Ertan U.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Sep;32(5):684-689
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to triethanolamine in a child.  
Milanesi N, Berti S, Gola M.
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 May;32(3):e112-e113
Click to view abstract

Thiocolchicoside: An unusual suspect of drug hypersensitivity.  
Amaral L, Carolino F, Carneiro-Leao L, as de CE, Cernadas JR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Apr 19;

Surgery-related contact dermatitis: a review of potential irritants and allergens.  
Cook KA, Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Apr 7;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Analysis of 133 Cases After an Allergy Workup.  
varez-Perea A, Ameiro B, Morales C, Zambrano G, Rodriguez A, Guzman M, Zubeldia JM, Baeza ML.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Apr 4;
Click to view abstract

Development of anaphylactic cow's milk allergy following cow's milk elimination for eosinophilic esophagitis in a teenager.  
Soller L, Mill C, Avinashi V, Teoh T, Chan ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Apr 4;

Association analysis of allergic sensitization susceptibility loci with atopic dermatitis in Chinese population.  
Gao J, Ma Y, Sheng Y, Zuo X, Wang W, Zheng X, Tang H, Tang X, Zhou F, Yang S, Zhang X, Sun L.
J Dermatol Sci 2015 Dec;80(3):217-220

Allergic delayed drug hypersensitivity is more frequently diagnosed in drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome than in exanthema induced by beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Ben-Said B, rnaud-Butel S, Rozieres A, Rodet K, Berard F, Nicolas JF, Nosbaum A.
J Dermatol Sci 2015 Oct;80(1):71-74

The Seed Biotinylated Protein of Soybean (Glycine max): A Boiling-Resistant New Allergen (Gly m 7) with the Capacity To Induce IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.  
Riascos JJ, Weissinger SM, Weissinger AK, Kulis M, Burks AW, Pons L.
J Agric Food Chem 2016 May 18;64(19):3890-3900
Click to view abstract

Purification and characterization of protamine, the allergen from the milt of Large Yellow Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea), and Its components.  
Liu YY, Chen XF, Hu JW, Chen ZW, Zhang LJ, Cao MJ, Liu GM.
J Agric Food Chem 2016 Mar 9;64(9):1999-2011
Click to view abstract

The major soybean allergen Gly m Bd 28K induces hypersensitivity reactions in mice sensitized to cow's milk proteins.  
Candreva AM, Smaldini PL, Curciarello R, Fossati CA, Docena GH, Petruccelli S.
J Agric Food Chem 2016 Feb 24;64(7):1590-1599
Click to view abstract

Presence of undeclared food allergens in cumin: the need for multiplex methods.  
Garber EA, Parker CH, Handy SM, Cho CY, Panda R, Samadpour M, Reynaud DH, Ziobro GC.
J Agric Food Chem 2016 Feb 10;64(5):1202-1211
Click to view abstract

Multi-allergen Quantitation and the Impact of Thermal Treatment in Industry-Processed Baked Goods by ELISA and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.  
Parker CH, Khuda SE, Pereira M, Ross MM, Fu TJ, Fan X, Wu Y, Williams KM, DeVries J, Pulvermacher B, Bedford B, Zhang X, Jackson LS.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Dec 16;63(49):10669-10680
Click to view abstract

Enzymatic hydrolysis does not reduce the biological reactivity of soybean proteins for all allergic subjects.  
Panda R, Tetteh AO, Pramod SN, Goodman RE.
J Agric Food Chem 2015 Nov 4;63(43):9629-9639
Click to view abstract

Qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oils: A literature-based database on contact allergens used for safety assessment.  
Dornic N, Ficheux AS, Roudot AC.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Oct;80226-232
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.  
Verhoeckx K, Broekman H, Knulst A, Houben G.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Aug;79118-124
Click to view abstract

Safety assessment of freeze-dried powdered Tenebrio molitor larvae (yellow mealworm) as novel food source: Evaluation of 90-day toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats.  
Han SR, Lee BS, Jung KJ, Yu HJ, Yun EY, Hwang JS, Moon KS.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Jun;77206-212
Click to view abstract

Usage patterns of aromatherapy among the French general population: A descriptive study focusing on dermal exposure.  
Dornic N, Ficheux AS, Roudot AC, Saboureau D, Ezzedine K.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Apr;7687-93
Click to view abstract

Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Consumer safety (SCCS) - Opinion on the safety of the use of Methylisothiazolinone (MI) (P94), in cosmetic products (sensitisation only).  
Scientific Committee Of Consumer Safety-Sccs, Gimenez-Arnau AM.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2016 Apr;76211-212
Click to view abstract

Fragrance sensitisers: Is inhalation an allergy risk?  
Basketter D, Kimber I.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Dec;73(3):897-902
Click to view abstract

Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?  
Moretto A.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Nov;73(2):681-686
Click to view abstract

Revision of the opinion on peanut oil - Sensitisation only.  
Coenraads PJ.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Nov;73(2):667

Quantitative risk assessment of the aggregate dermal exposure to the sensitizing fragrance geraniol in personal care products and household cleaning agents.  
Nijkamp MM, Bokkers BG, Bakker MI, Ezendam J, Delmaar JE.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2015 Oct;73(1):9-18
Click to view abstract


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