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 Allergy Advisor Digest - August 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Anisakis hypersensitivity in Italy
Read Differences in both prevalence and titre of specific immunoglobulin E among children with asthma in affluent and poor communities within a large town in Ghana.
Read Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.
Read Methylisothiazolinone contact allergy and dose-response relationships.
Read Clinical and experimental studies of octocrylene's allergenic potency.
Read Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.
Read Allergens and their role in the allergic immune response
Read Instant controlled pressure drop on IgE antibody reactivity to peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean proteins.
Read It's time to rethink mite allergen avoidance.
Read Prediction of IgE-binding epitopes by means of allergen surface comparison and correlation to cross-reactivity.
Read Atopy is associated with asthma in adults living in rural and urban Southwestern Nigeria.
Read Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media: an update.
Read Prevalence of hypersensitivity to Cupressus pollen in allergic patients in Monterey, Mexico.

Abstracts shared in August 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Severe asthma with fungal sensitization.
Read Role of sensitization to mammalian serum albumin in allergic disease.
Read Allergy to hazelnut in adults in Turkey
Read Tab y 1 with inhibitory activity of platelet aggregation from salivary glands of Horse bot fly.
Read Bird Fancier's Lung: A State-of-the-Art Review.
Read IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to cannabis in laboratory personnel.
Read Pru p 3-sensitised Italian peach-allergic patients are less likely to develop severe symptoms when also presenting IgE antibodies to Pru p 1 and Pru p 4.
Read House dust mite sensitization in toddlers predicts current wheeze at age 12 years.
Read anti-IgA antibodies in adverse reactions to gamma globulin infusion: review of the literature
Read Correlation of specific IgE to shrimp with cockroach and dust mite exposure and sensitization.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anisakis hypersensitivity in Italy
Background: Anisakis simplex (As), a parasite in fish, is able to sensitize humans via the alimentary tract. The prevalence of hypersensitivity and allergy to As outside the Iberian peninsula has not been investigated so far. We investigated Anisakis hypersensitivity in different areas of Italy.

Methods: Consecutive subjects seen at 34 Italian allergy centers from October to December 2010 were investigated both by specific interview and by skin prick test (SPT) with As extract.

Results: A total of 10 570 subjects were screened, of which 474 (4.5%) scored positive on Anisakis SPT and 66 of these (14% of those sensitized; 0.6% of the studied population) had a history of As allergy. Marinated anchovies were the most frequent cause of allergic reactions. Thirty-four (52%) patients were mono-sensitized to Anisakis. Sensitization rate showed marked geographic differences (range: 0.4-12.7%), being highest along the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian coasts, where homemade marinated anchovies are an age-old tradition. In inland centers in northern Italy, the prevalence was directly related to the number of inhabitants. The analysis of the impact of immigration on the prevalence of Anisakis hypersensitivity showed that about 60% of sensitized subjects in Milano and Torino came from southern Italy or from non-European countries.

Conclusions: Anisakis hypersensitivity and allergy are mainly a matter of dietary habits. Areas where marinated anchovies are popular can be considered as 'endemic' for this type of food allergy, whereas immigration and, possibly, new or imported trendy food styles, such as eating raw fish carpaccios or sushi, are a major causative factor in big cities of inland zones

Anisakis hypersensitivity in Italy: prevalence and clinical features: a multicenter study.  
AAITO-IFIACI Anisakis Consortium.
Allergy 2011 Aug 18;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Differences in both prevalence and titre of specific immunoglobulin E among children with asthma in affluent and poor communities within a large town in Ghana.
In this study in Ghana, in the relatively affluent school, asthma/wheezing and exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB were associated with high titre IgE antibodies to mite, decreased total IgE, and increased BMI. This contrasted with children in the urban poor school and suggests that changes relevant to a Western model of childhood asthma can occur within a short geographical distance within a large city in Africa

Differences in both prevalence and titre of specific immunoglobulin E among children with asthma in affluent and poor communities within a large town in Ghana.  
Stevens W, ddo-Yobo E, Roper J, Woodcock A, James H, Platts-Mills T, Custovic A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug 2;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.
Autoimmune orchitis is a relevant cause of decreased fecundity in males, and it is defined as a direct aggression to the testis with the concomitant presence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The presence of these specific antibodies has been observed in approximately 5-12% of infertile male partners. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by isolated infertility with ASA but without evidence of a systemic disease. Secondary causes of orchitis and/or testicular vasculitis are uniformly associated with autoimmune diseases, mainly in primary vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa, Behcet's disease, and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The overall frequencies of acute orchitis and ASA in rheumatic diseases are 2-31% and 0-50%, respectively.

Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.  
Silva CA, Cocuzza M, Borba EF, Bonfa E.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 13;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylisothiazolinone contact allergy and dose-response relationships.
Methylisothiazolinone (MI) contact allergy and dose-response relationships: a maximum of 100 ppm MI is permitted in cosmetic products. Eighteen per cent of MI-allergic patients reacted to a concentration 20 times lower in a repeated open application test (ROAT). The amounts used in cosmetics should be reduced, and the development of MI contact allergy should be monitored closely.

Methylisothiazolinone contact allergy and dose-response relationships.  
Lundov MD, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):330-336

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical and experimental studies of octocrylene's allergenic potency.
Reports of positive patch test and photopatch test reactions to the chemical ultraviolet filter octocrylene (added to sunscreens) have increased during the last decade. Results of patch tests and photopatch tests with octocrylene in patients with adverse skin reactions to sunscreen products and/or ketoprofen were collected. 23 cases of positive test reactions to octocrylene (5 patch test and 18 photopatch) are reported. Notably, many of these patients also had positive photopatch test reactions to ketoprofen and benzophenone-3. Octocrylene was shown to be a moderate sensitizer in the LLNA, and it reacted with amines such as lysine, but not with thiols such as cysteine. Octocrylene is both a photocontact allergen and a contact allergen. Octocrylene's ability to cause contact allergy is probably attributable to its reactivity towards lysine. To be able to understand why octocrylene causes photocontact allergy, further studies are needed.

Clinical and experimental studies of octocrylene's allergenic potency.  
Karlsson I, Vanden BK, Martensson J, Goossens A, Borje A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):343-352

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.
Despite the public interest in hypoallergenic dogs, few scientific, including epidemiological studies have attempted to evaluate claims of hypoallergenicity. A web search was conducted to identify breeds cited as hypoallergenic. Four separate classification schemes using combinations of purebred and mixed breed dogs were used to compare the levels of Canis familiaris 1 in dust samples collected from homes with hypoallergenic versus nonhypoallergenic dogs from an established birth cohort. No classification scheme showed that the level of dog allergen in homes with hypoallergenic dogs differed from other homes.

Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.  
Nicholas CE, Wegienka GR, Havstad SL, Zoratti EM, Ownby DR, Johnson CC.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jul;25(4):252-256

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens and their role in the allergic immune response
"Allergens are recognized as the proteins that induce immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses in humans. The proteins come from a range of sources and, not surprisingly, have many different biological functions. However, the delivery of allergens to the nose is exclusively on particles, which carry a range of molecules in addition to the protein allergens. These molecules include pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that can alter the response. Although the response to allergens is characterized by IgE antibodies, it also includes other isotypes (IgG, IgA, and IgG4), as well as T cells. The challenge is to identify the characteristics of these exposures that favor the production of this form of response. The primary features of the exposure appear to be the delivery in particles, such as pollen grains or mite feces, containing both proteins and PAMPs, but with overall low dose. Within this model, there is a simple direct relationship between the dose of exposure to mite or grass pollen and the prevalence of IgE responses. By contrast, the highest levels of exposure to cat allergen are associated with a lower prevalence of IgE responses. Although the detailed mechanisms for this phenomenon are not clear, it appears that enhanced production of interleukin-10 in response to specific Fel d 1 peptides could influence the response. However, it is striking that the animal sources that are most clearly associated with decreased responses at high allergen dose are derived from animals from which humans evolved more recently (~65 million years ago). Although the nose is still recognized as the primary route for sensitization to inhalant allergens, there is increasing evidence that the skin is also an important site for the generation of IgE antibody responses. By contrast, it is now evident that delivery of foreign proteins by the oral route or sublingually will favor the generation of tolerance."

Allergens and their role in the allergic immune response  
Thomas A. E. Platts-Mills and Judith A. Woodfolk
Immunological Reviews 2011;242(1):51-68

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Instant controlled pressure drop on IgE antibody reactivity to peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean proteins.
The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of controlled pressure drop treatment on peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean IgE antibody reactivity. Peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybeanseeds were subjected to DIC treatment at different pressure and time conditions (3 and 6 bar for 1 and 3 min). Control (raw) and DIC-treated extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using a serum pool from sensitized patients. DIC treatment did not affect the total protein content of legume seeds. Nevertheless, modifications of protein profiles after DIC showed a general decrease in IgE binding to legume proteins that was correlated to a higher steam pressure and longer treatment. The immunoreactivity of soybean proteins was almost abolished with treatment at 6 bar for 3 min.

Effect of instant controlled pressure drop on IgE antibody reactivity to peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean proteins.  
Cuadrado C, Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Muzquiz M, Haddad J, Allaf K, Rodriguez J, Crespo JF, Burbano C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 9;156(4):397-404

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
It's time to rethink mite allergen avoidance.
"Currently, there is no evidence-based framework for effective domestic allergen avoidance interventions to reduce chronic aeroallergen exposure. The development of an effective approach to allergen avoidance requires a better understanding of (a) the physical nature of chronic aeroallergen exposure and methods for measuring and reducing this, (b) the interaction between allergen exposure and innate immune modulators at different disease stages, and (c) markers enabling the identification of individuals who would benefit from this. "

It's time to rethink mite allergen avoidance.  
Tovey ER, Marks GB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 18;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prediction of IgE-binding epitopes by means of allergen surface comparison and correlation to cross-reactivity.
The experimental determination of conformational allergen epitopes recognized by IgE is a difficult task because they often involve discontinuous amino acid residues, being separated in the primary allergen sequence, and require the correct allergen fold. This study sought to develop a computational tool for the localization of conformational IgE epitopes by using a structure-based comparison of allergen surfaces and IgE cross-reactivity data. The approach involved the quantitative analysis of geometric and physicochemical surface parameters and the subsequent correlation of surface similarity scores to immunologic data. The software tool Surface comparison-based Prediction of Allergenic Discontinuous Epitopes (SPADE) was able to predict the IgE epitopes of an allergen given the availability of at least 2 structural models and IgE reactivity data. This study reports on the application of this tool to 3 allergen families: the lipocalins, the group 10 pathogenesis-related proteins, and the group 2/3 grass pollen allergens. The study succeeded in the partial relocalization of IgE epitopes of bovine beta-lactoglobulin and grass pollen Phl p 2 as known from the x-ray structures of their antibody complexes. Second, the relative binding of anti-Bet v 1 IgE to 10 homologous proteins was measured and correlated to surface comparison results involving Bet v 1, 5 of the homologs, and 2 hypoallergenic Bet v 1 isoforms. The IgE-reactive surface portions were thereby predicted in agreement with IgE epitope-mapping studies.

Prediction of IgE-binding epitopes by means of allergen surface comparison and correlation to cross-reactivity.  
Dall'antonia F, Gieras A, Devanaboyina SC, Valenta R, Keller W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 26;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Atopy is associated with asthma in adults living in rural and urban Southwestern Nigeria.
This study examined the relationship between atopy and asthma in adults at two rural Health Centers and urban university college hospital in southwestern Nigeria. A convenient sample of 55 consecutive patients with stable physician-diagnosed asthma and 55 age-matched nonasthmatic controls seen at the outpatient clinics in two rural Health Centers and an urban university hospital were enrolled. Asthmatics in both urban and rural settings had significantly more positive skin reactions to house dust mite, cockroach, mold, and mouse epithelium than nonasthmatic controls (p < .05). Mean total serum IgE was also significantly higher in asthmatics than in nonasthmatic controls (360 vs. 90 IU/L, p <.001). Stool parasitemia was infrequent in both groups and not statistically significant.

Atopy is associated with asthma in adults living in rural and urban Southwestern Nigeria.  
Ige OM, Arinola OG, Oluwole O, Falade AG, Falusi AG, Aderemi T, Huo D, Olopade OI, Olopade CO.
J Asthma 2011 Aug 24;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media: an update.
Late adverse reactions (LAR) to contrast media (CM) are defined as reactions occurring 1 h to 1 week after exposure. In view of more prospective studies of LAR and new data about their pathophysiology, the Contrast Medium Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) reviewed the literature on LAR and updated their guidelines. LAR after CM include symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, headache, itching, skin rash, musculoskeletal pain, and fever. Skin reactions are well-documented LAR to CM with an incidence of approximately 2%-4% after nonionic monomers. The commonest skin reactions are maculopapular rashes, erythema and skin swelling. These reactions are T cell-mediated immune reactions, and the diagnosis may be confirmed using skin tests (patch or delayed reading intradermal).

(On behalf of the Contrast Media Safety Committee of European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR)).

Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media: an update.  
Bellin MF, Stacul F, Webb JA, Thomsen HS, Morcos SK, Almén T, Aspelin P, Clement O, Heinz-Peer G, Reimer P, van der Molen A
Miscellaneous Eur Radiol. 2011 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of hypersensitivity to Cupressus pollen in allergic patients in Monterey, Mexico.
In a previous study of pollen concentration in Monterrey, Mexico, Cupressus occupied the 3rd place in frequency. An observational, cross-sectional and prospective study to assess potential exposure and allergic symptoms to pollen was conducted. Skin test was conducted in 256 patients (136 women), 130 younger than 18 years old and 126 adults. The skin test was positive in 39 patients (15.2%). Of the 36 aeroallergens tested, Cupressus occupied the 7th place in frequency. Of the 130 under 18 years, only 10 (7.7%) had a positive skin test. Among the other 129 adults, 29 (22.5%) had a positive skin test (p = 0.001). Patients with a positive skin test Cupressus had at least one positive skin test to other aeroallergen in 97% of cases (p = 0.001).

Prevalence of hypersensitivity to Cupressus pollen in allergic patients in Monterey, Mexico. [Spanish]  
Leal Garcia LR, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Zarate Hernandez MC, Arias CA, Leal VL, Manrique Lopez MA, Valdes Burnes DA.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Sep;57(5):153-158

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Severe asthma with fungal sensitization.  
Agarwal R.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2011 Jul 26;

Role of sensitization to mammalian serum albumin in allergic disease.  
Liccardi G, Asero R, D'Amato M, D'Amato G.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2011 Aug 2;

The impact of climate change on ragweed pollination.  
Bush RK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2011 Jul 1;

Allergic drug reactions: from basic research to clinical practice.  
Blanca M, Thong BY.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug;11(4):275-278

Multicentre patch testing with compositae mix by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group.  
Isaksson M, Hansson C, Inerot A, Liden C, Matura M, Stenberg B, Moller H, Bruze M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2011 May;91(3):295-298
Click to view abstract

Psoriasiform drug eruption due to abatacept.  
Kato K, Satoh T, Nishizawa A, Yokozeki H.
Acta Derm Venereol 2011 May;91(3):362-363

Thermal angiooedema induced by hot water.  
Kobayashi A, Uhara H, Ashida A, Kiniwa Y, Okuyama R.
Acta Derm Venereol 2011 May;91(3):343-344

Allergy to hazelnut in adults: A two-step study.  
Pasaoglu G, Mungan D, Misirligil Z.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Aug 19;

Anisakis hypersensitivity in Italy: prevalence and clinical features: a multicenter study.  
AAITO-IFIACI Anisakis Consortium.
Allergy 2011 Aug 18;

T-cell and antibody responses to phospholipase A(2) from different species show distinct cross-reactivity patterns.  
Sin BA, Akdis M, Zumkehr J, Bezzine S, Bekpen C, Lambeau G, Akdis CA.
Allergy 2011 Aug 18;

A novel allergen Tab y 1 with inhibitory activity of platelet aggregation from salivary glands of horseflies.  
An S, Ma D, Wei JF, Yang X, Yang HW, Yang H, Xu X, He S, Lai R.
Allergy 2011 Aug 18;

Clinical value of negative skin tests to gadolinium contrast agents.  
Chiriac AM, Audurier Y, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Allergy 2011 Aug 19;

Effect of roasting on the allergenicity of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2/6: the necessity of degranulation assays.  
Vissers YM, Iwan M, del-Patient K, Stahl SP, Rigby NM, Johnson PE, Mandrup MP, Przybylski-Nicaise L, Schaap M, Ruinemans-Koerts J, Jansen AP, Mills EN, Savelkoul HF, Wichers HJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug 1;

Immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity to amoxicillin: in vivo and in vitro comparative studies between an injectable therapeutic compound and a new commercial compound.  
Torres MJ, Romano A, Blanca-Lopez N, Dona I, Canto G, Ariza A, Aranda A, Montanez MI, Mayorga C, Blanca M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug 4;

Differences in both prevalence and titre of specific immunoglobulin E among children with asthma in affluent and poor communities within a large town in Ghana.  
Stevens W, ddo-Yobo E, Roper J, Woodcock A, James H, Platts-Mills T, Custovic A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug 2;

Provocation tests with objective measures remain more diagnostic than surrogate immunoglobulin E antibody measures of sensitization.  
Hamilton RG.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug;41(8):1048-1049

Effects of Helicobacter pylori, geohelminth infection and selected commensal bacteria on the risk of allergic disease and sensitization in 3-year-old Ethiopian children.  
Amberbir A, Medhin G, Erku W, Alem A, Simms R, Robinson K, Fogarty A, Britton J, Venn A, Davey G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Aug 10;

Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.  
Silva CA, Cocuzza M, Borba EF, Bonfa E.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 13;

Bird Fancier's Lung: A State-of-the-Art Review.  
Chan AL, Juarez MM, Leslie KO, Ismail HA, Albertson TE.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 26;

Contact dermatitis caused by C30-38 olefin/isopropyl maleate/MA copolymer in a sunscreen.  
Kai AC, White JM, White IR, Johnston G, McFadden JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):353-354

Can exposure limitations for well-known contact allergens be simplified? An analysis of dose-response patch test data.  
Fischer LA, Menne T, Voelund A, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):337-342
Click to view abstract

Methylisothiazolinone contact allergy and dose-response relationships.  
Lundov MD, Zachariae C, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):330-336
Click to view abstract

Clinical and experimental studies of octocrylene's allergenic potency.  
Karlsson I, Vanden BK, Martensson J, Goossens A, Borje A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):343-352
Click to view abstract

C(16)-methyl corticosteroids are far less allergenic than the non-methylated molecules.  
Baeck M, Chemelle JA, Rasse C, Terreux R, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):305-312
Click to view abstract

Patch, prick or intradermal tests to detect delayed hypersensitivity to corticosteroids?  
Soria A, Baeck M, Goossens A, Marot L, Duveille V, Derouaux AS, Nicolas JF, Tennstedt D.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):313-324
Click to view abstract

Patch tests with beryllium salts.  
Bircher AJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):363-364

Danger from the workplace: allergic contact dermatitis from the first exposure to isothiazolinones.  
Willi R, Pfab F, Zilker T, Buters J, Schalock P, Huss-Marp J, Todorova A, Ring J, Darsow U.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):361-362

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by diethylthiourea in a neoprene handle of a cleaning trolley.  
Liippo J, Ackermann L, Lammintausta K.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):359-360

Bis-diglycerylpolyacyladipate-2: an emergent allergen in cosmetics?  
Du-Thanh A, Raison-Peyron N, Guillot B.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):358-359

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropion-amidine) dihydrochloride used in the manufacture of acrylic polymers.  
Oliphant T, Wilkinson M, Wright A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):356-357

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by Solvent Orange 60 dye.  
Yeo L, Kuuliala O, White IR, to-Korte K.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jun;64(6):354-356

Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm on primary human sinonasal epithelial culture.  
Singhal D, Baker L, Wormald PJ, Tan L.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jul;25(4):219-225

Sphenoid sinus fungus ball: Our experience.  
Pagella F, Pusateri A, Matti E, Giourgos G, Cavanna C, De BF, Bignami M, Castelnuovo P.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jul;25(4):276-280

Paranasal sinus mucoceles with ophthalmologic manifestations: A 17-year review of 96 cases.  
Kim YS, Kim K, Lee JG, Yoon JH, Kim CH.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jul;25(4):272-275

Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.  
Nicholas CE, Wegienka GR, Havstad SL, Zoratti EM, Ownby DR, Johnson CC.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jul;25(4):252-256

Anaphylactic shock in surgery of liver hydatid cyst in children: a case report. [French]  
El KA, Azizi R, Ghannam A, Mekkaoui N, El HM, Ech-Cherif El KS.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Apr;30(4):369-371
Click to view abstract

Empathy, understanding, and objectivity need to prevail for students with food allergies.  
Greenhawt MJ, Green TD, Pistiner M, Mitchell L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):93-94

On the cover - black locust.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):A8

Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: an update on natural history and review of management.  
Leonard SA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):95-101

Extension of food allergen specific IgE ranges from the ImmunoCAP to the IMMULITE systems.  
Hamilton RG, Mudd K, White MA, Wood RA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):139-144

Validation of the biogenics research chamber for Juniperus ashei (mountain cedar) pollen.  
Jacobs RL, Ramirez DA, Andrews CP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):133-138

Presence of food allergy emergency action plans in Mississippi.  
Pulcini JM, Marshall GD, Naveed A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Aug;107(2):127-132

Dithiols as chelators. A cause of bullous skin reactions. [German]  
Storim J, Stoevesandt J, Anders D, Kneitz H, Brocker EB, Trautmann A.
Hautarzt 2011 Mar;62(3):215-218
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis: a history with emphasis on food allergy  
Stephen R. Boden and A. Wesley Burks
Immunological Reviews 2011;242(1):247-257
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergens and their role in the allergic immune response  
Thomas A. E. Platts-Mills and Judith A. Woodfolk
Immunological Reviews 2011;242(1):51-68
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Does allergen avoidance work?  
Bush RK.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Aug;31(3):493-507

The relationship of rhinitis and asthma, sinusitis, food allergy, and eczema.  
Tan RA, Corren J.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Aug;31(3):481-491

Exercise-Independent Wheat-Induced Anaphylaxis Caused by omega-5 Gliadin in Mice.  
Tanaka M, Nagano T, Yano H, Haruma K, Kato Y.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 10;156(4):434-442

Risk Assessment of Immediate Systemic Reactions from Skin Tests with beta-Lactam Antibiotics.  
Antico A, Pagani M, Compalati E, Vescovi PP, Passalacqua G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 10;156(4):427-433

Effect of instant controlled pressure drop on IgE antibody reactivity to peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean proteins.  
Cuadrado C, Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Muzquiz M, Haddad J, Allaf K, Rodriguez J, Crespo JF, Burbano C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 9;156(4):397-404

Specific tear IgE in patients with moderate-to-severe autumnal allergic conjunctivitis.  
Mimura T, Usui T, Mori M, Funatsu H, Noma H, Amano S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 9;156(4):381-386

IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to cannabis in laboratory personnel.  
Herzinger T, Schopf P, Przybilla B, Rueff F.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 10;156(4):423-426

Pru p 3-sensitised Italian peach-allergic patients are less likely to develop severe symptoms when also presenting IgE antibodies to Pru p 1 and Pru p 4.  
Pastorello EA, Farioli L, Pravettoni V, Scibilia J, Mascheri A, Borgonovo L, Piantanida M, Primavesi L, Stafylaraki C, Pasqualetti S, Schroeder J, Nichelatti M, Marocchi A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 9;156(4):362-372

Predictive Surrogate Markers of Allergy: A By-Product of Recombinant Allergens?  
Andre C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug 9;156(4):349-351

Sequential development of eczematous type 'multiple drug allergy' to unrelated drugs.  
Ozkaya E, Yazganoglu KD.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jul;65(1):e26-e29

Angioedema-type swelling and herpes simplex virus reactivation following hyaluronic acid injection for lip augmentation.  
Dougherty AL, Rashid RM, Bangert CA.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jul;65(1):e21-e22

Response of recalcitrant erythema nodosum to tetracyclines.  
Davis MD.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jun;64(6):1211-1212

Treatment of tattoo allergy with ablative fractional resurfacing: a novel paradigm for tattoo removal.  
Ibrahimi OA, Syed Z, Sakamoto FH, Avram MM, Anderson RR.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jun;64(6):1111-1114
Click to view abstract

Severe serum sickness-like type III reaction to insulin detemir.  
Aujero MP, Brooks S, Li N, Venna S.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jun;64(6):e127-e128

The cutaneous and systemic manifestations of azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome.  
Bidinger JJ, Sky K, Battafarano DF, Henning JS.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Jul;65(1):184-191
Click to view abstract

It's time to rethink mite allergen avoidance.  
Tovey ER, Marks GB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 18;

Allergic reactions to manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz): Identification of novel allergens with potential involvement in latex-fruit syndrome.  
Santos KS, Galvao CE, Gadermaier G, Resende VM, de Oliveira MC, Misumi DS, Yang AC, Ferreira F, Palma MS, Kalil J, Castro FF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 18;

Food protein-induced enterocolitis to hen's egg.  
Caubet JC, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 17;

House dust mite sensitization in toddlers predicts current wheeze at age 12 years.  
Lodge CJ, Lowe AJ, Gurrin LC, Hill DJ, Hosking CS, Khalafzai RU, Hopper JL, Matheson MC, Abramson MJ, Allen KJ, Dharmage SC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 5;

Effect of prenatal indoor pet exposure on the trajectory of total IgE levels in early childhood.  
Havstad S, Wegienka G, Zoratti EM, Lynch SV, Boushey HA, Nicholas C, Ownby DR, Johnson CC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 4;

Short ragweed pollen triggers allergic inflammation through Toll-like receptor 4-dependent thymic stromal lymphopoietin/OX40 ligand/OX40 signaling pathways.  
Li DQ, Zhang L, Pflugfelder SC, De Paiva CS, Zhang X, Zhao G, Zheng X, Su Z, Qu Y.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 5;

Comments on cow's milk allergy and diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines.  
Slater JE, Rabin RL, Martin D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug;128(2):434

Outcomes of office-based, open food challenges in the management of food allergy.  
Lieberman JA, Cox AL, Vitale M, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 9;

The role of anti-IgA antibodies in causing adverse reactions to gamma globulin infusion in immunodeficient patients: A comprehensive review of the literature.  
Rachid R, Bonilla FA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 9;

Prediction of IgE-binding epitopes by means of allergen surface comparison and correlation to cross-reactivity.  
Dall'antonia F, Gieras A, Devanaboyina SC, Valenta R, Keller W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 26;

Correlation of specific IgE to shrimp with cockroach and dust mite exposure and sensitization in an inner-city population.  
Wang J, Calatroni A, Visness CM, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Aug 25;

Work-Related Stress and Asthma: Results from a Workforce Survey in New Zealand.  
Eng A, Mannetje AT, Pearce N, Douwes J.
J Asthma 2011 Aug 24;

Atopy is associated with asthma in adults living in rural and urban Southwestern Nigeria.  
Ige OM, Arinola OG, Oluwole O, Falade AG, Falusi AG, Aderemi T, Huo D, Olopade OI, Olopade CO.
J Asthma 2011 Aug 24;

Allergens in household dust and serological indicators of atopy and sensitization in detroit children with history-based evidence of asthma.  
Williams AH, Smith JT, Hudgens EE, Rhoney S, Ozkaynak H, Hamilton RG, Gallagher JE.
J Asthma 2011 Sep;48(7):674-684

Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome: a rare and serious complication.  
Schweitzer I.
Med J Aust 2011 Jun 6;194(11):609-610

Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media: an update.  
Bellin MF, Stacul F, Webb JA, Thomsen HS, Morcos SK, Almén T, Aspelin P, Clement O, Heinz-Peer G, Reimer P, van der Molen A
Miscellaneous Eur Radiol. 2011 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print]

Use of allergen components begins a new era in pediatric allergology.  
Borres MP, Ebisawa M, Eigenmann PA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug;22(5):454-461

Prevalence of hypersensitivity to Cupressus pollen in allergic patients in Monterey, Mexico. [Spanish]  
Leal Garcia LR, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Zarate Hernandez MC, Arias CA, Leal VL, Manrique Lopez MA, Valdes Burnes DA.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Sep;57(5):153-158

Airway exposure to hypochlorite prior to ovalbumin induces airway hyperreactivity without evidence for allergic sensitization.  
Hox V, Vanoirbeek JA, Callebaut I, Bobic S, De V, Ceuppens J, Hoet P, Nemery B, Hellings PW.
Toxicol Lett 2011 Jul 28;204(2-3):101-107
Click to view abstract


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