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 Allergy Advisor Digest - December 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the December 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.
Read Natural history of immediate-type hen's egg allergy in Japanese children.
Read Cross-sensitization profiles of edible nuts in a birch-endemic area.
Read Cockroach allergen exposure and risk of asthma.
Read Emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents and young adults with food allergy.
Read Powder milk: a user-friendly and safe product for heated-milk food challenge?
Read Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.
Read The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to Amoxicillin and Clavulanic acid.
Read Different co-sensitizations could determine different risk assessment in peach allergy? Evaluation of an anaphylactic biomarker in Pru p 3 positive patients.
Read Laboratory animal allergy in the modern era.
Read Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.
Read Impact of allergic reactions on food-specific IgE concentrations and skin test results.

Snippets posted in the December 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Occupational allergic asthma induced by Liposcelis decolor.
Read Cor a 14 is the superior serological marker for hazelnut allergy in children, independent of concomitant peanut allergy.
Read Short ragweeds is highly cross-reactive with other ragweeds.
Read Erratum to: Guidelines for the use and interpretation of diagnostic methods in adult food allergy.
Read Celiac Disease: Advances in Diagnosis.
Read Interpreting IgE sensitization tests in food allergy.
Read The common food additive carrageenan and the alpha-gal epitope.
Read Role of oats in celiac disease.
Read Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.
Read Clinical and immunological characteristics of a pediatric population with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to fish.
Read Salmon roe-specific serum IgE predicts oral salmon roe food challenge test results.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.
This review presents the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discusses the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as research goals.

Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.  
Commins SP, Jerath MR, Cox K, Erickson LD, Platts-Mills T.
Allergol Int 2015 Nov 21;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Natural history of immediate-type hen's egg allergy in Japanese children.
This study investigated tolerance acquisition in Japanese children allergic to hens egg (HE). In this retrospective study, 226 children with a history of immediate-type HE allergy underwent an oral food challenge (OFC). Tolerance acquisition occurred in 30% (66/226) by 3 years of age, 59% (133/226) by 5 years of age, and 73% (164/226) at 6 years of age. At 3 years, incidences of allergy-related complications (bronchial asthma, p = 0.02; atopic dermatitis, p = 0.04) were higher in the group III than in the group I. Anaphylaxis to any food occurred more frequently in the group III than in the group I (p = 0.03); anaphylaxis to HE was more common in the group III (p = 0.04). Egg white (EW)- and ovomucoid (OM)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were higher in the group III than in the group I (p < 0.05).

Natural history of immediate-type hen's egg allergy in Japanese children.  
Ohtani K, Sato S, Syukuya A, Asaumi T, Ogura K, Koike Y, Iikura K, Yanagida N, Imai T, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2015 Nov 28;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-sensitization profiles of edible nuts in a birch-endemic area.
Sensitization to birch pollen causes cross-sensitization to nuts, but rarely leads to clinical nut allergy. The aim is to study sensitizations to nuts in individuals sensitized to birch pollen and examine cross-reactivities between birch and nut species. Of subjects with birch sensitization, 84% were co-sensitized to hazelnut, 71% to almond, and 60% to peanut. In a subgroup without birch sensitization, young children (<5 years) were most commonly nut sensitized (8 to 40%); and this prevalence decreased in adolescents and further in adults (4 to 12%). Cashew and pistachio, (rho = 0.66; P <.001) and pecan and walnut (rho = 0.65; P <.001) correlated the strongest. The majority of nut-sensitized patients (71% hazelnut, 83% almond, 73% peanut) reported no or mild symptoms. Co-sensitizations between nuts and birch were similar in Lapland with its lower birch-pollen exposure.

Cross-sensitization profiles of edible nuts in a birch-endemic area.  
Uotila R, Kukkonen AK, Pelkonen A, Makela MJ.
Allergy 2015 Dec 25;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cockroach allergen exposure and risk of asthma.
Cockroach sensitization is an important risk factor for the development of asthma. However, its underlying immune mechanisms and the genetic etiology for differences in allergic responses remain unclear. Cockroach allergens identification and their expression as biologically active recombinant proteins has provided a basis for studying the mechanisms regarding cockroach allergens induced allergic sensitization and asthma. Glycans in allergens may play a crucial role in the immunogenicity of allergic diseases. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, Toll-like receptor (TLR), and C-type lectin receptors have been suggested to be important for the penetration of cockroach allergens through epithelial cells to mediate allergen uptake, dendritic cell maturation, antigen presenting cell (APC) function in T cell polarization, and cytokine production. Environmental pollutants, which often co-exist with the allergen, could synergistically elicit allergic inflammation, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation and signaling may serve as a link between these two elements. Genetic factors may also play an important role in conferring the susceptibility to cockroach sensitization. Several genes have been associated with cockroach sensitization and asthma-related phenotypes. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological evidence for cockroach allergen-induced asthma, cockroach allergens, the mechanisms regarding cockroach allergens induced innate immune responses, and the genetic basis for cockroach sensitization.

Cockroach allergen exposure and risk of asthma.  
Do DC, Zhao Y, Gao P.
Allergy 2015 Dec 25;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents and young adults with food allergy.
Adolescents with food allergy have poorer psychosocial outcomes compared to their non-allergic counterparts; however, few studies have prospectively examined the mental health of adolescents and young adults in this vulnerable population. The objectives of this study was to estimate the prevalence of emotional and behavioral problems in an epidemiological sample of adolescents and young adults with food allergy; determine if food allergy is associated with adolescent and maternal reports of such problems; and, examine patterns of change in emotional and behavioral problems from adolescence to young adulthood among individuals with and without food allergy. Data came from 1303 participants at the 14 and 21-years of age in the Mater University Study of Pregnancy. The study concludes that emotional and behavioral problems, particularly symptoms of depression, anxiety, and ADHD are common among adolescents with food allergy in the general population, and in the case of elevated levels of depressive symptoms, persist into young adulthood.

Emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents and young adults with food allergy.  
Ferro MA, Van Lieshout RJ, Ohayon J, Scott JG.
Allergy 2015 Dec 30;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Powder milk: a user-friendly and safe product for heated-milk food challenge?
Challenge with instant skim milk powder could be a safe, convenient and easily standardizable alternative to home baked food for heated milk challenge. Further controlled studies are needed before this can be implemented to practice

Powder milk: a user-friendly and safe product for heated-milk food challenge?  
Cherkaoui S, Begin P, Paradis L, Paradis J, Des RA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1139

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.
Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments

Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.  
Potiwat R, Sitcharungsi R.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec;33(4):267-275

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to Amoxicillin and Clavulanic acid.
Betalactam (BL) antibiotics are the drugs most frequently involved in IgE-mediated reactions. The culprit BL varies according to consumption patterns, with amoxicillin (AX) more prevalent in Southern Europe and penicillin V in Scandinavian countries. Nowadays, the combination of AX and clavulanic acid (CLV), is the most highly consumed BL containing medicine worldwide. Both BLs, AX and CLV, can independently be involved in reactions, which poses a diagnostic challenge. In patients with immediate allergic reactions to AX, two patterns of responses have been described, those responding to benzylpenicillin (cross-reactors) and those selective to AX. In addition, selective reactions to CLV account for around 30% of allergic reactions to the combination AX-CLV. These patterns of IgE recognition could be related to differences in the haptenation process, in the immunological response, or in the BL involved in the first sensitization. In this regard, patients with selective responses to CLV are generally younger than those allergic to AX or benzylpenicillin. So far, no evidence of cross reactivity between CLV and other BLs has been reported. This shows the importance of an accurate diagnosis of CLV allergy, since patients with selective reactions to CLV could take other BLs including AX. Diagnosis can be performed in vivo and in vitro, although no immunoassay currently exists. Research regarding the CLV antigenic determinants and protein conjugates is essential to improve diagnosis. BLs need to covalently bind to a carrier protein to be immunogenic. The antigenic determinant of AX is the amoxicilloyl amide, but CLV leads to unstable structures, many of which are unknown. Moreover, the nature of the BL-protein conjugates plays an important role in IgE recognition. This review aims to summarise current knowledge on the immunochemistry, diagnostic approaches as well as chemical and proteomic studies for both AX and CLV.

The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to Amoxicillin and Clavulanic acid.  
Torres MJ, Montanez MI, Ariza A, Salas M, Fernandez TD, Barbero N, Mayorga C, Blanca M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 13;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Different co-sensitizations could determine different risk assessment in peach allergy? Evaluation of an anaphylactic biomarker in Pru p 3 positive patients.
In Italy, the nsLTP (Pru p 3) has been identified as the most frequent cause of food allergy and anaphylaxis. In order to estimate the risk assessment in peach allergy, the authors investigated the presence of correlations between the levels of sIgE to Pru p 3 with the severity of the clinical symptoms in two Pru p 3 positive populations from two different areas of Italy. 133 consecutively Pru p 3 positive patients were recruited from South Italy, where the prevalence of PR-10 and profilin sensitization is low, and from North-East Italy, where the sensitization to pathogenesis related protein -10 (PR-10) and profilin is higher. All 133 patients were positive to SPT to peach extract and to sIgE to Pru p 3. The North-East population was simultaneously positive to Pru p 1 (42.8 %) and Pru p 4 (12.7 %), while no Southern patients were positive to PR-10 or to profilin. A significant difference in the levels of sIgE to Pru p 3 was found only in South Italy Pru p 3 + patients vs. asymptomatic patients (p = 0.01) and in mild reactions vs. severe reactions (p = 0.0008). In South Italy patients, it was also found a significant correlation between the severity of the clinical reaction and the levels of sIgE to Pru p 3 (p = 0.001). Therefore level of sIgE to Pru p 3 indicates the possibility of development a severe food allergic reaction. Pru p 3 positive patients from different geographical areas and with different co-sensitizations to Pru p 1 and/or Pru p 4 could have a different risk assessment in peach allergy.

Different co-sensitizations could determine different risk assessment in peach allergy? Evaluation of an anaphylactic biomarker in Pru p 3 positive patients.  
Uasuf CG, Villalta D, Conte ME, Di SC, Barrale M, Cantisano V, Pace E, Gjomarkaj M, Gangemi S, Brusca I.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;1330

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Laboratory animal allergy in the modern era.
Laboratory animal workers face a high risk of developing laboratory animal allergy as a consequence of inhaling animal proteins at work; this has serious consequences for their health and future employment. Exposure to animal allergen remains to be the greatest risk factor although the relationship is complex, with attenuation at high allergen exposure. Recent evidence suggests that this may be due to a form of natural immunotolerance. Furthermore, the pattern of exposure to allergen may also be important in determining whether an allergic or a tolerant immune response is initiated. Risk associated with specific tasks in the laboratory need to be determined to provide evidence to devise a code of best practice for working within modern laboratory animal facilities. Recent evidence suggests that members of lipocalin allergens, such as Mus m 1, may act as immunomodulatory proteins, triggering innate immune receptors through toll-like receptors and promoting airway laboratory animal allergy. This highlights the need to understand the relationship between endotoxin, animal allergen and development of laboratory animal allergy to provide a safe working environment for all laboratory animal workers

Laboratory animal allergy in the modern era.  
Jones M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Dec;15(12):73

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.
The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, 'Deuteromycetes' or 'Fungi Imperfecti.' During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group.

Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.  
Levetin E, Horner WE, Scott JA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impact of allergic reactions on food-specific IgE concentrations and skin test results.
Although there is concern that food allergy reactions may negatively affect the natural history of food allergy, the impact of reactions on food-specific IgE (sIgE) levels or skin prick test (SPT) wheal size is unknown. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of allergic reactions on SPT wheal size and sIgE concentrations to milk, egg, and peanut. Participants included 512 infants with likely milk or egg allergy enrolled in a multicenter observational study. Changes in sIgE level and SPT wheal size to milk, egg, and peanut were measured before and after oral food challenge (OFC) or accidental exposure for 377 participants. The study concludes that the results suggest that reactions from OFCs and accidental exposure are not associated with increases in sensitization among children allergic to milk, egg, or peanut

Impact of allergic reactions on food-specific IgE concentrations and skin test results.  
Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Vickery BP, Perry TT, Jones SM, Leung DY, Blackwell B, Dawson P, Burks AW, Lindblad R, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 21;

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.  
Commins SP, Jerath MR, Cox K, Erickson LD, Platts-Mills T.
Allergol Int 2015 Nov 21;
Click to view abstract

Natural history of immediate-type hen's egg allergy in Japanese children.  
Ohtani K, Sato S, Syukuya A, Asaumi T, Ogura K, Koike Y, Iikura K, Yanagida N, Imai T, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2015 Nov 28;
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergic asthma induced by Liposcelis decolor.  
Marco G, Pelta R, Carnes J, Iraola V, Zambrano G, Baeza ML.
Allergol Int 2015 Dec 9;

Cor a 14 is the superior serological marker for hazelnut allergy in children, independent of concomitant peanut allergy.  
Eller E, Mortz CG, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Allergy 2015 Dec 15;
Click to view abstract

Cross-sensitization profiles of edible nuts in a birch-endemic area.  
Uotila R, Kukkonen AK, Pelkonen A, Makela MJ.
Allergy 2015 Dec 25;
Click to view abstract

Patterns of adaptation to children's food allergies.  
Fedele DA, McQuaid EL, Faino A, Strand M, Cohen S, Robinson J, Atkins D, Hourihane JO, Klinnert MD.
Allergy 2015 Dec 20;
Click to view abstract

Standardization of allergen products: 2. Detailed characterization of GMP-produced recombinant Phl p 5.0109 as European Pharmacopoeia reference standard.  
Himly M, Nandy A, Kahlert H, Thilker M, Steiner M, Briza P, Angela N, Klysner S, van RR, Buchheit KH, Vieths S, Ferreira F.
Allergy 2015 Dec 20;
Click to view abstract

Cockroach allergen exposure and risk of asthma.  
Do DC, Zhao Y, Gao P.
Allergy 2015 Dec 25;
Click to view abstract

Emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents and young adults with food allergy.  
Ferro MA, Van Lieshout RJ, Ohayon J, Scott JG.
Allergy 2015 Dec 30;
Click to view abstract

Powder milk: a user-friendly and safe product for heated-milk food challenge?  
Cherkaoui S, Begin P, Paradis L, Paradis J, Des RA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1139
Click to view abstract

The evolving story of human leukocyte antigen and the immunogenetics of peanut allergy.  
Hemler JA, Phillips EJ, Mallal SA, Kendall PL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Dec;115(6):471-476
Click to view abstract

Short ragweeds is highly cross-reactive with other ragweeds.  
Christensen LH, Ipsen H, Nolte H, Maloney J, Nelson HS, Weber R, Lund K.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Dec;115(6):490-495
Click to view abstract

Is the performance of ImmunoCAP ISAC 112 sufficient to diagnose peach and apple allergies?  
D'Amelio CM, Goikoetxea MJ, Martinez-Aranguren R, Garcia BE, Gomez F, Fernandez J, Bartra J, Blanca-Lopez N, az-Perales A, Sanz ML.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Dec 9;

Allergen of the Month-Japanese Maple.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Dec;115(6):A17

Prevalence of biphasic response in anaphylaxis due to purposeful administration of allergenic food.  
Katz Y, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Spergel JM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Dec;115(6):526-527

Factors associated with the presence of allergen-specific ige responses in asthma patients who had no ige responses detectable by mast-2. [Japanese]  
Iijima H, Kaneko Y, Masuko H, Yamada H, Yatagai Y, Sakamoto T, Kanemoto K, Ishikawa H, Saito T, Endo T, Ninomiya H, Nomura A, Kodama T, Kaneko N, Kokubu F, Makita H, Konno S, Nishimura M, Hizawa N.
Arerugi 2015 Sep;64(9):1242-1253
Click to view abstract

The correlation between intradermal testing and serum specific IgE to house dust mite in negative skin prick test allergic rhinitis adult patients.  
Tantilipikorn P, Danpornprasert P, Ngaotepprutaram P, Assanasen P, Bunnag C, Thinkhamrop B.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec;33(4):308-311
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Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.  
Potiwat R, Sitcharungsi R.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec;33(4):267-275
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Erratum: Airborne pollen survey in Bangkok, Thailand: A 35-year update.  

Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec;33(4):349
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Analysis of IgE binding patterns to house dust mite allergens in scabies-endemic communities: insights for both diseases.  
Walton SF, Slender A, Pizutto S, Mounsey KE, Opresecu F, Thomas WR, Hales BJ, Currie BJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec;45(12):1868-1872

Human memory CD4+ T cell response to the major dog allergen Can f 5, prostatic kallikrein.  
Kailaanmaki A, Kinnunen T, Ronka A, Rytkonen-Nissinen M, Lidholm J, Mattsson L, Randell J, Virtanen T.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 18;
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Lack of allergy to timothy grass pollen is not a passive phenomenon but associated with allergen-specific modulation of immune reactivity.  
Hinz D, Seumois G, Gholami AM, Greenbaum JA, Lane J, White B, Broide DH, Schulten V, Sidney J, Bakhru P, Oseroff C, Wambre E, James EA, Kwok WW, Peters B, Vijayanand P, Sette A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 14;
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The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to Amoxicillin and Clavulanic acid.  
Torres MJ, Montanez MI, Ariza A, Salas M, Fernandez TD, Barbero N, Mayorga C, Blanca M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 13;
Click to view abstract

The response to nasal allergen provocation with grass pollen is reduced in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis and grass sensitization.  
Calus L, Devuyst L, Van ZT, De RN, Derycke L, Bachert C, Gevaert P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 13;
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Does LEAP change the screening paradigm for food allergy in infants with eczema?  
Allen K, Koplin J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 10;
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Different Bla-g T cell antigens dominate responses in asthma versus rhinitis subjects.  
Dillon MB, Schulten V, Oseroff C, Paul S, Dullanty LM, Frazier A, Belles X, Piulachs MD, Visness C, Bacharier L, Bloomberg GR, Busse P, Sidney J, Peters B, Sette A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec;45(12):1856-1867
Click to view abstract

Different co-sensitizations could determine different risk assessment in peach allergy? Evaluation of an anaphylactic biomarker in Pru p 3 positive patients.  
Uasuf CG, Villalta D, Conte ME, Di SC, Barrale M, Cantisano V, Pace E, Gjomarkaj M, Gangemi S, Brusca I.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;1330
Click to view abstract

Erratum to: Guidelines for the use and interpretation of diagnostic methods in adult food allergy.  
Macchia D, Melioli G, Pravettoni V, Nucera E, Piantanida M, Caminati M, Campochiaro C, Yacoub MR, Schiavino D, Paganelli R, Di GM.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;1331
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Patterns of Allergic Sensitization in High IgE Syndromes.  
Lawrence MG.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Dec;15(12):70
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Celiac Disease: Advances in Diagnosis.  
Snyder MR, Murray JA.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 10;
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Interpreting IgE sensitization tests in food allergy.  
Chokshi NY, Sicherer SH.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 15;1-15
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Measuring total IgE is useful in detecting exacerbations in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis receiving omalizumab.  
Bobolea I, Fernandez RC, az-Campos R, Melero-Moreno C, Vives-Conesa R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 24;

Drug fever after a single dose of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid.  
Mori F, Fili L, Barni S, Sarti L, Pucci N, Parronchi P, Novembre E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 24;

Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.  
Levetin E, Horner WE, Scott JA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 24;
Click to view abstract

Usefulness of basophil activation test in diagnosis of hypersensitivity to etoricoxib.  
Phillips-Angles E, Gonzalez-Munoz M, Dominguez-Ortega J, Cabanas R, Quirce S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 24;

Impact of allergic reactions on food-specific IgE concentrations and skin test results.  
Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Vickery BP, Perry TT, Jones SM, Leung DY, Blackwell B, Dawson P, Burks AW, Lindblad R, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Dec 21;
Click to view abstract

The common food additive carrageenan and the alpha-gal epitope.  
Tobacman JK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec;136(6):1708-1709

Consequences of avoiding beta-lactams in patients with beta-lactam allergies.  
Jeffres MN, Narayanan PP, Shuster JE, Schramm GE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 11;
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Pre-existing anti-polyethylene glycol antibody linked to first-exposure allergic reactions to pegnivacogin, a PEGylated RNA aptamer.  
Ganson NJ, Povsic TJ, Sullenger BA, Alexander JH, Zelenkofske SL, Sailstad JM, Rusconi CP, Hershfield MS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 11;

Sensitization to cat and dog allergen molecules in childhood and prediction of symptoms of cat and dog allergy in adolescence: A BAMSE/MeDALL study.  
Asarnoj A, Hamsten C, Waden K, Lupinek C, Andersson N, Kull I, Curin M, Anto J, Bousquet J, Valenta R, Wickman M, van HM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 10;
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Early sensitization is associated with reduced lung function from birth into adulthood.  
Owens L, Laing I, Zhang G, Le SP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 10;

Risk stratification and skin testing to guide re-exposure in taxane-induced hypersensitivity reactions.  
Picard M, Pur L, Caiado J, Giavina-Bianchi P, Galvao VR, Berlin ST, Campos SM, Matulonis UA, Castells MC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 23;
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Should wheat, barley, rye, and/or gluten be avoided in a 6-food elimination diet?  
Kliewer KL, Venter C, Cassin AM, Abonia JP, Aceves SS, Bonis PA, Dellon ES, Falk GW, Furuta GT, Gonsalves N, Gupta SK, Hirano I, Kagalwalla A, Leung J, Mukkada VA, Spergel JM, Rothenberg ME.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Dec 24;
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Role of oats in celiac disease.  
Comino I, Moreno Mde L, Sousa C.
Miscellaneous World J Gastroenterol 2015 Nov 7;21(41):11825-31.
Abstract

Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.  
Walker MJ, Burns DT, Elliott CT, Gowland MH, Mills EN.
Miscellaneous Analyst 2015 Nov 4.
Abstract

Clinical and immunological characteristics of a pediatric population with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to fish.  
Gonzalez-Delgado P, Caparros E, Moreno MV, Clemente F, Flores E, Velasquez L, Rubio G, Fernandez J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec 17;
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Salmon roe-specific serum IgE predicts oral salmon roe food challenge test results.  
Yanagida N, Minoura T, Takahashi K, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec 31;
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Alterations in the gut microbiotas of children with food sensitization in early life.  
Chen CC, Chen KJ, Kong MS, Chang HJ, Huang JL.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec 12;
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Exposure to mould allergens and rhinoconjunctivitis in Korean Children.  
Hahm MI, Kim J, Kwon HJ, Chae Y, Ahn K, Lee HY.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec 12;
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Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does not exist.  
Dreborg S.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;837
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Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does exist.  
Vandenplas Y.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;836
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Clinical phenotype and allergen sensitization in the first 2 years as predictors of atopic disorders at age 5 years.  
Quah PL, Loo EX, Lee GN, Kuo IC, Gerez I, Llanora GV, Chan YH, Aw M, Shek LP, Lee BW.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;8(1):33
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