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 Allergy Advisor Digest - December 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

Journals List | Journals Captured this Month | ALL Articles captured this Month

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the December 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Approach to hypersensitivity reactions from intravenous iron preparations.
Read Analysis of feline and canine allergen components in patients sensitized to pets.
Read Molecular approaches for the analysis of airborne pollen: A case study of Juniperus pollen.
Read Salmon roe (ikura)-induced anaphylaxis in a child.
Read Immunodominance in allergic T-cell reactivity to Japanese cedar in different geographic cohorts.
Read Sub-pollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study.
Read Anaphylaxis to foods in a population of adolescents: incidence, characteristics and associated risks.
Read Different clinical allergological features of Taenia solium infestation.
Read Impacts of thermal treatments on major and minor allergens of sea snail, Cerithidea obtusa (Obtuse Horn Shell).
Read Identification and characterization of main allergic proteins in cooked Wolf herring fish.
Read Mouse sensitization and exposure are associated with asthma severity in urban children.
Read Advances in food allergy in 2015.

Snippets posted in the December 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Cured meat intake is associated with worsening asthma symptoms.
Read Food allergy to millet and cross-reactivity with rice, corn and other cereals.
Read Shellfish allergens: tropomyosin and beyond.
Read Polyethylene glycol as a cause of anaphylaxis.
Read Anaphylaxis to supplemental oral lactase enzyme.
Read Usefulness of component resolved analysis of cat allergy in routine clinical practice.
Read Cross-reactive LTP sensitization in food-dependent exercise-induced urticaria/anaphylaxis: a pilot study of a component-resolved and in vitro depletion approach.
Read Fungal sensitization is associated with increased risk of life-threatening asthma.
Read Anaphylaxis after Zoster Vaccine: Implicating Alpha-Gal Allergy as a possible mechanism.
Read Shrimp allergy: analysis of commercially available extracts for in-vivo diagnosis.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Approach to hypersensitivity reactions from intravenous iron preparations.
Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to intravenous iron preparations (IVIPs) are well known. With newer preparations, HSRs have become rarer; however, severe reactions may still occur. We retrospectively reviewed records of patients evaluated for HSRs to IVIPs, to determine the safety of controlled re-administration (CRA). Allergological workup included a detailed history, skin prick tests (SPTs) with IVIP, and basophil activation tests (BATs) in some patients. CRA with an IVIP was done if indicated. 31 patients with mild to severe reactions were evaluated. SPTs and BATs were negative in all patients tested. 18 CRAs in 15 patients were performed. 12 patients tolerated the procedure, including three with a previous grade IV HSR. Two developed urticaria, one developed urticaria and dyspnea. The pathophysiology of HSRs to IVIPs remains currently unclear. SPTs and BATs provided no additional information. However, in appropriate situations, CRA under surveillance can be safely performed in most patients.

Approach to hypersensitivity reactions from intravenous iron preparations.  
Morales Mateluna CA, Scherer HK, Bircher AJ.
Allergy 2016 Dec 15;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of feline and canine allergen components in patients sensitized to pets.
70 patients, aged 18-65 with a positive feline or canine allergy diagnosis were included in the research group. The total IgE levels of all patients with allergies as well as their allergen-specific IgE to feline and canine allergens were measured. Specific IgE levels to canine (Can f 1, Can f 2, Can f 3, Can f 5) and feline (Fel d 1, Fel d 2, Fel d 4) allergen components were also measured with the use of the ImmunoCap method. Monosensitization for only one canine or feline component was found in 30% of patients. As predicted, the main feline allergen was Fel d 1, which sensitized as many as 93.9% of patients sensitized to felines. Among 65 patients sensitized to at least one feline component, for 30 patients (46.2%) the only sensitizing feline component was Fel d 1. Only 19 patients in that group (63.3%) were not simultaneously sensitized to dogs and 11 (36.7%), the isolated sensitization to feline Fel d 1 notwithstanding, displayed concurrent sensitizations to one of the canine allergen components. Fel d 4 sensitized 49.2% of the research group.64.3% of patients sensitized to canine components had heightened levels of specific IgE to Can f 1. Monosensitization in that group occurred for 32.1% of the patients. Sensitization to Can f 5 was observed among 52.4% of the patients. Concurrent sensitizations to a few allergic components, not only cross-reactive but also originating in different protein families, are a significant problem for patients sensitized to animals

Analysis of feline and canine allergen components in patients sensitized to pets.  
Ukleja-Sokolowska N, Gawronska-Ukleja E, Zbikowska-Gotz M, Socha E, Lis K, Sokolowski L, Kuzminski A, Bartuzi Z.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1261

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular approaches for the analysis of airborne pollen: A case study of Juniperus pollen.
Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), this study evaluated pollen concentrations in air samples. Juniperus pollen was selected as a model because of the importance of this pollen in the southcentral United States. Pollen concentrations from the qPCR data were significantly correlated with concentrations determined through light microscopy (R = 0.902, P < .001). The study also confirmed an overlap in the pollination seasons between Juniperus ashei and Juniperus pinchotii and between J ashei and Juniperus virginiana. The authors found that this method correctly identified different Juniperus species present in mixed air samples in the southcentral United States, an accomplishment that cannot be achieved using microscopic identification.

Molecular approaches for the analysis of airborne pollen: A case study of Juniperus pollen.  
Mohanty RP, Buchheim MA, Levetin E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 23;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Salmon roe (ikura)-induced anaphylaxis in a child.
Salmon roe (ikura)-induced anaphylaxis in a child. An 18-month-old white boy was seen in consultation for an anaphylactic reaction after ingestion of Thai food and sushi. Within 15 minutes after ingestion he developed generalized urticaria. He vomited once but had no res- piratory distress or wheezing and no angioedema. In vitro speci?c IgE produced a positive result to salmon caviar (1.61 kU/L) but less than 0.35 kU/L to peanut, rice, shrimp, soy, and salmon. At a subsequent visit, SPT with cured salmon roe (ikura) was performed. After 15 minutes, he had large skin test reactions with a 14-mm wheal and 28-mm ?are on the ?rst test and a 15-mm wheal and 30-mm ?are on the second test.

Salmon roe (ikura)-induced anaphylaxis in a child.  
Minhas J, Saryan JA, Balekian DS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 22;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunodominance in allergic T-cell reactivity to Japanese cedar in different geographic cohorts.
Japanese cedar (JC) pollen is a common trigger for allergic rhinitis in Japan. Pollen proteins targeted by IgE, including Cry j 1 and Cry j 2, and isoflavone reductase (IFR) have been identified. This study compared antigen-specific IgE titers and T-cell responses to JC pollen-derived extract and peptides in cohorts with high and low pollen exposure. JC pollen-specific T-cell reactivity and IgE titers were significantly higher in the allergic compared with the nonallergic Japanese cohort, which was also associated with different patterns of polysensitization. Interestingly, a significant overlap was observed in the hierarchy of the T-cell epitopes in the allergic Japanese cohort compared with the allergic non-Japanese cohort. In all 3 cohorts, T-cell reactivity was dominantly directed against peptides from the major allergens Cry j 1 and 2, with few T-cell responses detected against IFR.

Immunodominance in allergic T-cell reactivity to Japanese cedar in different geographic cohorts.  
Oseroff C, Pham J, Frazier A, Hinz D, Sidney J, Paul S, Greenbaum JA, Vita R, Peters B, Schulten V, Sette A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):680-689

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sub-pollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study.
Short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) allergies affect more than 36 million people annually. Ragweed pollen grains release sub-pollen particles (SPP) of respirable size upon hydration or a change in air electrical conditions. The aim of this study was to characterise the proteomes and allergomes of short ragweed SPP and total pollen protein extract (TOT), and compare their effects with those of standard aqueous pollen protein extract (APE) using sera from short ragweed pollen-sensitized patients. The SPP fraction contained the highest proportion (94%) of the allergome, with the largest quantities of the minor Amb a 4 and major Amb a 1 allergens, and as unique, NADH dehydrogenases. APE was the richest in Amb a 6, Amb 5, and Amb a 3, and TOT fraction was the richest in the Amb a 8 allergens (83% and 89% of allergome, respectively). Allergenic potency correlated well among the three fractions tested, with 1D immunoblots demonstrating a slight predominance of IgE-reactivity to SPP compared to TOT and APE. However, the strongest IgE binding in ELISA was noted against APE. New allergenic candidates, phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglucomutase, were identified in all the three pollen fractions. Enolase, UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, and polygalacturonase were observed in SPP and TOT fractions as novel allergens of the short ragweed pollen, as previously described.

Sub-pollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study.  
Smiljanic K, Apostolovic D, Trifunovic S, Ognjenovic J, Perusko M, Mihajlovic L, Burazer L, van HM, Cirkovic VT.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec 21;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to foods in a population of adolescents: incidence, characteristics and associated risks.
The aim of this study was to describe reactions to foods, including anaphylaxis, with regard to incidence, characteristics and associated risks, among 16-year-olds (adolescents) in a large, population-based birth cohort. Parent-reported questionnaire data from ages 2-3 months, and 1, 2 and 16 years were used (N = 3153). Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to 14 common food and inhalant allergens were analysed at ages 4 (n = 2283) and 16 years (n = 2510). In the 12 months prior to the 16-year assessment, 8.5% of adolescents had FRS. This included 0.8% (n = 24) adolescents who were classified as having anaphylaxis, yielding an incidence rate of 761/100 000 person-years. One-third of adolescents accessed health care during anaphylaxis. Peanuts and tree nuts were the most common culprit foods for anaphylaxis, and fruits and vegetables for non-anaphylactic reactions. Adolescents with anaphylaxis were significantly more likely to be sensitized to storage proteins (Ara h 2, Cor a 9, Cor a 14) and to be polysensitized to foods.

Anaphylaxis to foods in a population of adolescents: incidence, characteristics and associated risks.  
Vetander M, Protudjer JL, Lilja G, Kull I, Hedlin G, van HM, Ostblom E, Bergstrom A, Wickman M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec;46(12):1575-1587

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Different clinical allergological features of Taenia solium infestation.
The tapeworm Taenia (T.) solium can be responsible for two different conditions: taeniasis and cysticercosis. Helminth infections in human host cause an immune response associated with elevated levels of IgE, tissue eosinophilia and mastocytosis, and with the presence of CD4+ T cells that preferentially produce IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Individuals exposed to helminth infections may have allergic inflammatory responses to parasites and parasite antigens. PubMed search of human cases of allergic reactions occurring during T. solium infestation was performed combining the terms (allergy, urticaria, angioedema, asthma, anaphylaxis) with T. solium. A study was considered eligible for inclusion in the review if it reported data on patients with T. solium infestation who had signs or symptoms of allergy. In literature we found six articles reporting the association between an allergic reaction and T. solium infestation: two cases of urticaria, two cases of relapsing angioedema, one case of asthma and two cases of anaphylaxis. Despite the large diffusion of T. solium infestation, we found only a few cases of concomitant allergic reaction and the presence of Taenia in the host. The association between T. solium infestation and allergic manifestations has never been clearly demonstrated, and in absence of a well-documented causality the hypotheses are merely speculative. Therefore, the association between Taenia infection and allergy needs to be thoroughly studied to better clarify if this association may really exist and which is the pathogenetic mechanism supported

Different clinical allergological features of Taenia solium infestation.  
Minciullo PL, Cascio A, Isola S, Gangemi S.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;1418

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impacts of thermal treatments on major and minor allergens of sea snail, Cerithidea obtusa (Obtuse Horn Shell).
Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the major and minor allergens of the local marine snail (Cerithidea obtusa) and subsequently to investigate the impacts of heat treatment on the IgE-binding activity of snail allergens. Proteins from raw and heat-treated snails (boiled, roasted and fried) were assessed. Immunoblotting of all extracts were then performed using sera from patients with snail allergy. The results showed that the raw extract contains numerous protein bands between 12 to>250 kDa. Some thermostable proteins, predominantly the 33 and 42 kDa bands, remained detected in all cooked extracts with decreasing intensities from boiled to roasted to fried extracts, while the majority of thermolabile bands denatured after heating. Boiled snail had more protein bands compared to roasted and fried snails. Immunoblotting of raw extract demostrated 19 IgE-binding bands ranging from 15 to 240 kDa. The thermostable bands of 33 and 42 kDa and a thermolabile of 30 kDa band were identified as the major allergens of this snail. The cooked extracts yielded less allergenic bands. The boiled extract yielded approximately 14 IgE-binding bands with some smeared bands at high molecular weight regions. The roasted extract had lesser IgE-binding bands and the majority appeared as smears, while the IgE-reactivity in the fried extract was less visible and appeared as weak smears. This study indicated that both raw and cooked snails played a crucial role in snail allergenicity, as this species of snail contains both thermostable and thermolabile major allergens. The degree of snail allergenicity was revealed in the order: raw> boiled > roasted> fried.

Impacts of thermal treatments on major and minor allergens of sea snail, Cerithidea obtusa (Obtuse Horn Shell).  
Misnan R, Salahudin Abd AN, Mohamad Yadzir ZH, Bakhtiar F, Abdullah N, Murad S.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Aug;15(4):309-316

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification and characterization of main allergic proteins in cooked Wolf herring fish.
The aim in this study was to identify and characterize allergic proteins in cooked wolf herring fish. We heated the crude extract alternatively at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 degrees C for one hour and results were compared. Also, proteins were immunoblotted with fish-sensitive patients' sera. SDS-PAGE of the crude extract showed more than 15 distinct protein bands. Five of these proteins, with apparent molecular weights of 12, 18, 24, 38, and 51 kDa, were only observed in the 100 degrees C heated extract. Immunoblotting of the heated extract revealed that the 12 and 51 kDa proteins were IgE-immunoreactive with 88 percent of fish-sensitive patient sera while the 24 and 38 kDa proteins reacted with 33.3 and 55.5 percent of fish-sensitive patient sera, respectively. Mass spectrometry of the 12, 38, and 51 kDa proteins revealed that all three were parvalbumin oligomers. Disk ELISA results showed that 20 of 25 and 14 of 25 fish-allergic patients' sera were IgE-reactive with purified oligomeric parvalbumin-coated and crude extract-coated disks, respectively. Parvalbumin and its oligomers are the main allergenic molecules in cooked fish.

Identification and characterization of main allergic proteins in cooked Wolf herring fish.  
Mohamadi M, Falak R, Mokhtarian K, Khoramizadeh MR, Sadroddiny E, Kardar GA.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Oct;15(5):363-371

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mouse sensitization and exposure are associated with asthma severity in urban children.
Mouse sensitization and exposure are associated with uncontrolled asthma, but whether they are associated with asthma severity, an intrinsic disease characteristic and long-term outcome predictor, is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between mouse sensitization and/or exposure and asthma severity in urban children. A total of 645 children (5-17 years) with uncontrolled asthma underwent mouse sensitization evaluation. The study population was predominantly minority (69.6% black, 20.8% Hispanic), low income (61.8%), and mouse sensitized (54.4%). Mouse sensitization was associated with higher treatment step, independent of potential confounders. Mouse sensitization was associated independently with Composite Asthma Severity Index [CASI]). Among mouse-sensitized participants, higher bedroom floor and bed Mus m 1 were independently associated with treatment step, respectively. Higher bedroom floor Mus m 1 was independently associated with CASI.

Mouse sensitization and exposure are associated with asthma severity in urban children.  
Grant T, Aloe C, Perzanowski M, Phipatanakul W, Bollinger ME, Miller R, Matsui EC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 3;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Advances in food allergy in 2015.
This review highlights research advances in food allergy that were published in the Journal in 2015. The world of food allergy research continues to rapidly accelerate, with increasing numbers of outstanding submissions to the Journal. In 2015, important studies on the epidemiology of food allergy were published, suggesting differential rates of food allergy in specific racial and ethnic groups. Even more importantly, studies were published identifying specific risk factors for the development of peanut allergy, as well as specific prevention strategies. We also saw new studies on the diagnosis of food allergy and potential approaches to the treatment of food allergy, as well as novel mechanistic studies helping to explain the immunologic correlates of food allergy and food desensitization

Advances in food allergy in 2015.  
Wood RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1541-1547

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Cured meat intake is associated with worsening asthma symptoms.  
Li Z, Rava M,, B├ędard A, Dumas O, Garcia-Aymerich J, Leynaert B, Pison C, Le Moual N, Romieu I, Siroux V, Camargo CA Jr, Nadif R, Varraso R.
Thorax 2016 Dec 20. pii: thoraxjnl-2016-208375.
Abstract

Development of a prediction model for a severe reaction in cow's milk challenges.  
Sugiura S, Sasaki K, Matsui T, Nakagawa T, Kando N, Ito K.
Allergol Int 2016 Dec 23;

Food allergy to millet and cross-reactivity with rice, corn and other cereals.  
Hemmer W, Sesztak-Greinecker G, Wohrl S, Wantke F.
Allergol Int 2016 Dec 8;

Opisthorchis felineus negatively associates with skin test reactivity in Russia - EuroPrevall-INCO study.  
Fedorova OS, Janse JJ, Ogorodova LM, Fedotova MM, Achterberg RA, Verweij JJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Versteeg SA, Potts J, Minelli C, van RR, Burney P, Yazdanbakhsh M.
Allergy 2016 Dec 29;
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Shellfish allergens: tropomyosin and beyond.  
Faber MA, Pascal M, El KO, Sabato V, Hagendorens MM, Decuyper II, Bridts CH, Ebo DG.
Allergy 2016 Dec 27;
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The structure of the mite allergen Blo t 1 explains the limited antibody cross-reactivity to Der p 1.  
Meno KH, Kastrup JS, Kuo IC, Chua KY, Gajhede M.
Allergy 2016 Dec 20;
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Approach to hypersensitivity reactions from intravenous iron preparations.  
Morales Mateluna CA, Scherer HK, Bircher AJ.
Allergy 2016 Dec 15;
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What is the clinical value of negative predictive values of skin tests to iodinated contrast media?  
Soyyiit A, Gksel Z, Aydn M, Gentrk Z, Bavbek S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Nov;37(6):482-488
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Utility of component diagnostic testing in guiding oral food challenges to milk and egg.  
Wang J.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Nov;37(6):439-442
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Polyethylene glycol as a cause of anaphylaxis.  
Wylon K, Dolle S, Worm M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1267
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Anaphylaxis to supplemental oral lactase enzyme.  
Voisin MR, Borici-Mazi R.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1266
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Aspergillus march: from ABPA to aspergilloma to subacute invasive aspergillosis.  
Dogra V, Sinha AK, Saxena R, Talwar D.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1264
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Analysis of feline and canine allergen components in patients sensitized to pets.  
Ukleja-Sokolowska N, Gawronska-Ukleja E, Zbikowska-Gotz M, Socha E, Lis K, Sokolowski L, Kuzminski A, Bartuzi Z.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1261
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of beta-lactam allergy: a retrospective chart review of drug allergy assessment in a predominantly pediatric population.  
Abrams EM, Wakeman A, Gerstner TV, Warrington RJ, Singer AG.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1259
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Usefulness of component resolved analysis of cat allergy in routine clinical practice.  
Eder K, Becker S, San NM, Berghaus A, Groger M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1258
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Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin sensitization involvement and its association with the CysLTR1 variant in different asthma phenotypes.  
Matsumoto H, Kanemitsu Y, Nagasaki T, Tohda Y, Horiguchi T, Kita H, Kuwabara K, Tomii K, Otsuka K, Fujimura M, Ohkura N, Tomita K, Yokoyama A, Ohnishi H, Nakano Y, Oguma T, Hozawa S, Izuhar.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 26;
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Molecular approaches for the analysis of airborne pollen: A case study of Juniperus pollen.  
Mohanty RP, Buchheim MA, Levetin E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 23;
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Salmon roe (ikura)-induced anaphylaxis in a child.  
Minhas J, Saryan JA, Balekian DS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 22;

Simplification of intradermal skin testing in Hymenoptera venom allergic children.  
Cichocka-Jarosz E, Stobiecki M, Brzyski P, Rogatko I, Nittner-Marszalska M, Sztefko K, Czarnobilska E, Lis G, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec 13;
Click to view abstract

Immunodominance in allergic T-cell reactivity to Japanese cedar in different geographic cohorts.  
Oseroff C, Pham J, Frazier A, Hinz D, Sidney J, Paul S, Greenbaum JA, Vita R, Peters B, Schulten V, Sette A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):680-689
Click to view abstract

Rate of recurrent anaphylaxis and associated risk factors among Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents: A population-based study.  
Lee S, Bashore C, Lohse CM, Bellolio MF, Chamberlain A, Yuki K, Hess EP, Campbell RL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):655-660
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Sugammadex: An emerging trigger of intraoperative anaphylaxis.  
Ue KL, Kasternow B, Wagner A, Rutkowski R, Rutkowski K.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):714-716

Sub-pollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study.  
Smiljanic K, Apostolovic D, Trifunovic S, Ognjenovic J, Perusko M, Mihajlovic L, Burazer L, van HM, Cirkovic VT.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec 21;
Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy, anaphylaxis, adrenaline and exacerbations of asthma.  
Roberts G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec;46(12):1504-1505

Community healthcare professionals overestimate the risk of fatal anaphylaxis for food allergic children.  
Hanna HJ, Emmanuel J, Naim S, Umasunthar T, Boyle RJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec;46(12):1588-1595
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to foods in a population of adolescents: incidence, characteristics and associated risks.  
Vetander M, Protudjer JL, Lilja G, Kull I, Hedlin G, van HM, Ostblom E, Bergstrom A, Wickman M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Dec;46(12):1575-1587
Click to view abstract

Different clinical allergological features of Taenia solium infestation.  
Minciullo PL, Cascio A, Isola S, Gangemi S.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;1418
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Eosinophilic disorders of the gastro-intestinal tract: an update.  
Ridolo E, Melli V, De' AG, Martignago I.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;1417
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Cross-reactive LTP sensitization in food-dependent exercise-induced urticaria/anaphylaxis: a pilot study of a component-resolved and in vitro depletion approach.  
da Silva DM, Vieira TM, Pereira AM, de Sousa Moreira AM, Delgado JL.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;646
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The unsolved relationship of alcohol and asthma.  
Linneberg A, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Dec 14;171(3-4):155-157

Parental perception of their child's Quality of Life in children with non-Immunoglobulin-E mediated gastrointestinal allergies.  
Foong RX, Meyer R, Godwin H, Dziubak R, Lozinsky AC, Reeve K, Knibb R, Shah N.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Dec 19;
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Impacts of thermal treatments on major and minor allergens of sea snail, Cerithidea obtusa (Obtuse Horn Shell).  
Misnan R, Salahudin Abd AN, Mohamad Yadzir ZH, Bakhtiar F, Abdullah N, Murad S.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Aug;15(4):309-316
Click to view abstract

House dust mites confer a distinct immunological feature among dermatitis.  
Baris S, Ozen A, Akdeniz T, Karakoc-Aydiner E, Aydin O, Ercan H, Ogulur I, Camcioglu Y, Cengizlier R, Demirkesen C, Yucelten D, Demirel G, Barlan IB.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Aug;15(4):264-274
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Impact of IgE-mediated Food Allergy on Parental Quality of Life in Iranian Patients.  
Fathi SM, Tavakol M, Rezaei N, Movahedi M, Aghamohammadi A, Shariat M, Sadeghi B, Behniafard N, Darabi B, Hajikhani A, Abdollahpour I, Gharagozlou M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Oct;15(5):372-380
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Identification and characterization of main allergic proteins in cooked Wolf herring fish.  
Mohamadi M, Falak R, Mokhtarian K, Khoramizadeh MR, Sadroddiny E, Kardar GA.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Oct;15(5):363-371
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Fungal sensitization is associated with increased risk of life-threatening asthma.  
Medrek SK, Kao CC, Yang DH, Hanania NA, Parulekar AD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 22;
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An Examination of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire Performance in a Countrywide American Sample of Children: Cross-Cultural Differences in Age and Impact in the United States and Europe.  
DunnGalvin A, Koman E, Raver E, Frome H, Adams M, Keena A, Hourihane JO, Gallagher PL, Blok BF, Dubois A, Pyrz K, Bindslev-Jensen C, Stensgaard A, Boyle R, Vickers B, Smith J, Thisanayagam.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 22;
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First case of DRESS syndrome attributed to a spider bite.  
Eyraud A, Boursault L, Darrigade AS, Taieb A, Milpied B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 22;

Food Allergy Trends and Epinephrine Autoinjector Presence in Summer Camps.  
Schellpfeffer NR, Leo HL, Ambrose M, Hashikawa AN.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 3;
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Mouse sensitization and exposure are associated with asthma severity in urban children.  
Grant T, Aloe C, Perzanowski M, Phipatanakul W, Bollinger ME, Miller R, Matsui EC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 3;
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Anaphylaxis after Zoster Vaccine: Implicating Alpha-Gal Allergy as a possible mechanism.  
Stone CA, Hemler JA, Commins SP, Schuyler AP, Phillips EJ, Peebles RS, Fahrenholz JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 13;
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Crystal structure of Pla l 1 reveals both structural similarity and allergenic divergence within the Ole e 1-like protein family.  
Stemeseder T, Freier R, Wildner S, Fuchs JE, Briza P, Lang R, Batanero E, Lidholm J, Liedl KR, Campo P, Hawranek T, Villalba M, Brandstetter H, Ferreira F, Gadermaier G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 10;
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Tackling Bet v 1- and associated food allergies with a single hybrid protein.  
Hofer H, Asam C, Hauser M, Nagl B, Laimer J, Himly M, Briza P, Ebner C, Lang R, Hawranek T, Bohle B, Lackner P, Ferreira F, Wallner M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 6;
Click to view abstract

Advances in food allergy in 2015.  
Wood RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1541-1547
Click to view abstract

Molecular engineering of a therapeutic antibody for Blo t 5-induced allergic asthma.  
Chan JH, Chua YL, Peh HY, Jovanovic V, Gascoigne NR, Wong WS, Chew FT, Hanson BJ, Kemeny DM, MacAry PA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 3;

Dogs, cats, and asthma: Will we ever really know the true risks and benefits?  
Ownby DR, Johnson CC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1591-1592

Air pollutant-mediated disruption of sinonasal epithelial cell barrier function is reversed by activation of the Nrf2 pathway.  
London NR, Tharakan A, Rule AM, Lane AP, Biswal S, Ramanathan M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1736-1738

Linear epitope mapping of peanut allergens demonstrates individualized and persistent antibody-binding patterns.  
Hansen CS, Dufva M, Bogh KL, Sullivan E, Patel J, Eiwegger T, Szepfalusi Z, Nielsen M, Christiansen A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1728-1730

The association of asthma, total IgE, and blood lead and cadmium levels.  
Park S, Lee EH, Kho Y.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1701-1703

Controlled diesel exhaust and allergen coexposure modulates microRNA and gene expression in humans: Effects on inflammatory lung markers.  
Rider CF, Yamamoto M, Gunther OP, Hirota JA, Singh A, Tebbutt SJ, Carlsten C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec;138(6):1690-1700
Click to view abstract

Secondhand Smoke Exposure, Illness Severity and Resource Utilization in Pediatric Emergency Department Patients with Respiratory Illnesses.  
Merianos AL, Dixon CA, Mahabee-Gittens EM.
J Asthma 2016 Dec 8;0
Click to view abstract

Shrimp allergy: analysis of commercially available extracts for in-vivo diagnosis.  
Asero R, Scala E, Villalta D, Pravettoni V, Arena A, Billeri L, Colombo G, Cortellini G, Cucinelli F, De Cristofaro ML, Farioli L, Iemoli E, Lodi RF, Longo R, Losappio L, Macchia D, Maiett.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 13;0
Click to view abstract


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