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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the February 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Prime and boost aerosol exposure via fog machine or shisha smoke followed by cinnamon hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis to spiced food.
Read Debates in allergy medicine: baked milk and egg ingestion accelerates resolution of milk and egg allergy.
Read Cross-reactivity between major IgE core epitopes on Cry j 2 allergen of Japanese cedar pollen and relevant sequences on Cha o 2 allergen of Japanese cypress pollen.
Read Prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.
Read Early indoor aeroallergen exposure is not associated with development of sensitization or allergic rhinitis in high-risk children.
Read Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well-tolerated by egg allergic patients.
Read Pollinosis to tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and detection of allergenic proteins: a case report.
Read A Colorado allergist's experience with marijuana legalization.
Read Specific IgE to recombinant protein (Ber e 1) for the diagnosis of Brazil nut allergy.
Read Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for plane pollen associated peach allergy.
Read Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: evaluation and management.
Read Identification of Sola l 4 as Bet v 1 homologous pathogenesis related-10 allergen in tomato fruits.
Read Immunological behavior of in vitro digested egg-white lysozyme.
Read Lack of uniformity in the investigation and management of suspected beta-Lactam Allergy in children.
Read Anaphylaxis to pneumococcal vaccine; CRM(197): Novel cause of vaccine allergy.
Read Direct oral provocation tests in non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions related to beta-lactam antibiotics.
Read A further wheat allergen for baker's asthma: Tri a 40.

Snippets posted in the February 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Cross-reactivity of fish allergens based on a questionnaire and blood testing.
Read Added sensitivity of component-resolved diagnosis in hymenoptera venom-allergic patients with elevated serum tryptase and/or mastocytosis.
Read High prevalence of Anisakis simplex hypersensitivity and allergy in Sicily, Italy.
Read Wheat allergy and intolerence; recent updates and perspectives.
Read New shrimp IgE-binding proteins involved in mite-seafood cross-reactivity.
Read IgE to novel citrus seed allergens among cashew allergic children.
Read Symptoms suggestive of Cow's milk allergy in infancy and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.
Read Immediate hypersensitivity to extensively hydrolyzed formulas: an important reminder.
Read Prospective investigation on the transfer of Ara h 2, the most potent peanut allergen, in human breast milk.
Read Ole e 1, Ole e 7, and Ole e 9: Identifying distinct clinical subsets of olive tree-allergic patients.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prime and boost aerosol exposure via fog machine or shisha smoke followed by cinnamon hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis to spiced food.
Cinnamon aldehyde (alias cinnamaldehyde) is widely used in food, textile or cosmetic industry. It is mostly associated with contact allergy, but immediate type allergies have been reported. The present study was triggered by a case of anaphylactic events to cinnamon in food and upon skin prick test. We investigated a possible correlation of exposure to a disco fog machine and/or shisha consumption with immediate type hypersensitivity to cinnamon aldehyde in the patient and healthy volunteers. In both fog machines and shisha pipes heating of glycerol-based fluids before evaporation renders chemical transversion to malodorous acrolein. Therefore, both methods are frequently operated with aroma additives. Cinnamon aldehyde and derivatives could be detected by gas chromatography in sampled fog flavored with cola fragrance. The patient as well as healthy (mostly female) volunteers were skin prick tested using cinnamon aldehyde or fog fluid. Persons with a history of exposure to disco fog or shisha (n = 10, mean 32.8 years) reacted with a significantly larger wheal and flare reaction in the skin test than the non-exposed. This reaction was specific as compared to skin reactivity to cinnamon alcohol, with only a trend to higher reactivity in exposed persons (ns). From this data the authors conclude that hapten fragrances such as cinnamon aldehyde may during heating in glycerol fluids associate to complete antigens and via inspiration lead to specific immediate type hypersensitivity.

Prime and boost aerosol exposure via fog machine or shisha smoke followed by cinnamon hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis to spiced food.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Roth-Walter F, Leitner E, Buchleitner S, Vogelsang H, Kinaciyan T.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;94

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Debates in allergy medicine: baked milk and egg ingestion accelerates resolution of milk and egg allergy.
Cow's milk and hen's egg are ubiquitous in diets around the world and can be important sources of protein in young children. Unfortunately, milk and egg allergies are also some of the most common food allergies in childhood. Less allergenic forms of milk and egg due to heating and interactions with a food matrix, as in baked goods, are tolerated by a majority of milk- and egg-allergic patients. Adding baked milk and egg into the diets of milk- and egg-allergic children can broaden diets, increase nutrition, and improve quality of life. Most important, regular ingestion of baked milk and egg can help children outgrow their allergies to milk and egg. This article reviews our current understanding of baked milk and egg tolerance and outline how these baked forms accelerates tolerance to regular milk and egg

Debates in allergy medicine: baked milk and egg ingestion accelerates resolution of milk and egg allergy.  
Leonard SA.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;91

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactivity between major IgE core epitopes on Cry j 2 allergen of Japanese cedar pollen and relevant sequences on Cha o 2 allergen of Japanese cypress pollen.
Cry j 2 and Cha o 2 are major allergens in Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica; CJ) and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa; CO) pollen, respectively. This study assessed the epitopes related to the cross-reactivity between Cry j 2 and Cha o 2 using in vitro analyses. Correlative sequences and purified allergens showed cross-reactivity between Cry j 2 and Cha o 2 in IgE of CJ patients.

Cross-reactivity between major IgE core epitopes on Cry j 2 allergen of Japanese cedar pollen and relevant sequences on Cha o 2 allergen of Japanese cypress pollen.  
Miyaji K, Okamoto N, Saito A, Yasueda H, Takase Y, Shimakura H, Saito S, Sakaguchi M.
Allergol Int 2016 Feb 22;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.
Supermarket bakers are exposed not only to flour and alpha amylase but also other 'improver' enzymes, the nature of which is usually shrouded by commercial sensitivity. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.The prevalence of sensitisation to enzymes was investigated in 300 bakers, who had declared work related respiratory symptoms during routine health surveillance. The prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes ranged from 5% to 15%. Sensitisation was far more likely if the baker was sensitised also to either flour and or alpha amylase. The prevalence of sensitisation to an 'improver' enzyme did not appear to be related to the concentration of that enzyme in the mix.

Prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.  
Jones M, Welch J, Turvey J, Cannon J, Clark P, Szram J, Cullinan P.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Early indoor aeroallergen exposure is not associated with development of sensitization or allergic rhinitis in high-risk children.
This study concludes that perinatal indoor aeroallergen exposure does not seem to affect development of allergic sensitization or rhinitis during childhood questioning the relevance of allergen avoidance as a preventive measure. Other factors such as timing of allergen exposure or other environmental adjuvants may contribute in a more complex pathway to sensitization.

Early indoor aeroallergen exposure is not associated with development of sensitization or allergic rhinitis in high-risk children.  
Schoos AM, Chawes BL, Jelding-Dannemand E, Elfman LB, Bisgaard H.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well-tolerated by egg allergic patients.
Eggs are used in many food products and thus difficult to avoid. A technological process using a combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and heat treatment was designed to produce modified hen's egg with reduced allergenic potential. Analysis showed a clear decrease in intact proteins as well as a strong decrease of allergenicity. In a clinical study, 22 of the 24 patients with a confirmed egg allergy who underwent a double blind food challenge with the hydrolysed egg remained completely free of symptoms. Hydrolysed egg products may be beneficial as low allergenic foods for egg allergic patients to extent their diet.

Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well-tolerated by egg allergic patients.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Brockow K, Fiocchi A, Theler B, Vogel L, Ring J, Szepfalusi Z, Mazzina O, Schaller R, Fritsche R, Vissers YM, Nutten S.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollinosis to tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and detection of allergenic proteins: a case report.
A 31-year-old woman, who sampled A altissima pollen during a research project, had pollinosis symptoms, including shortness of breath, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, dry coughing, itching, and contact dermatitis, after direct exposure to A altissima pollen and during the 2 successive pollination seasons after the sampling (from mid-April to mid-May). The patient had a normal level of serum total IgE (33.2 IU/m) and was polysensitized to several inhalant allergens. IgE immuno- blotting using the serum of the allergic patient revealed 2 IgE-binding proteins of 42 and 52 kDa in both pollen extracts. This result contrasts with the findings of previous animal studies in which no speci?c IgE reactivity to the 52-kDa protein has been detected. This 52-kDa protein was present in variable concentrations in the 2014 and 2015 samples and seem to re?ect the variability of A altissima pollen.

Pollinosis to tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and detection of allergenic proteins: a case report.  
Mousavi F, Majd A, Shahali Y, Ghahremaninejad F, Kardar G, Pourpak Z.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 20;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A Colorado allergist's experience with marijuana legalization.
With the advent of marijuana legalization in Colorado, we describe 3 recent patients with distinct clinical presentations suggestive of marijuana sensitization. The results of skin testing by the “puddle” technique were positive in 2 of these patients but negative in the other. These cases indicate the need for clinicians to query their patients about marijuana exposure and, when appropriate, perform speci?c testing to establish sensitization.Further investigation to elucidate the speci?c sensitizing antigen(s) in marijuana or its derivatives (eg, wax, oils) is required to better understand the pathobiology of this environmental exposure. Patient 1 is a 28-year-old white man who presented with the chief concern of nasal congestion worsening around “pot”. He began working as a trimmer at a marijuana growth facility and shortly thereafter he developed “extreme” nasal congestion, which was intermittent initially but soon became persistent. During the past 2 months he had frequent wheezing with a chronic cough. Patient 2 is a 30-year-old white man who presented with a chief concern of allergic rhinitis and asthma symptoms after exposure to marijuana. He initially worked directly with the marijuana plants in growth facilities. He had increased wheezing, runny nose, itchy eyes, dry cough, and itchy hands with an eczematous rash, which got progressively worse over time while in the workplace and improved at home. Patient 3 is a 26-year-old white man who was referred with suspected anaphylaxis manifested as shortness of breath and chest pain after exposure to marijuana smoke. The concentrate he smoked was a carbon dioxide extracted marijuana wax that contained up to 60% to 70% tetrahydrocannabinol levels, which is in contrast to dispensary marijuana, which has tetrahydrocannabinol levels in the range of 20% to 25%.

A Colorado allergist's experience with marijuana legalization.  
Silvers WS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;116(2):175-177

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Specific IgE to recombinant protein (Ber e 1) for the diagnosis of Brazil nut allergy.
This study hypothesized that the use of sIgE to rBer e 1 instead of whole extract will improve the diagnostic accuracy in brazil nut allergy. A higher sensitivity of sIgE to rBer e 1 with no loss of specificity and thus overall higher predictive value was found. The study concludes that sIgE to recombinant allergen component rBer e 1 may provide higher sensitivity than whole brazil nut extract and should be further investigated.

Specific IgE to recombinant protein (Ber e 1) for the diagnosis of Brazil nut allergy.  
Rayes H, Abid RA, Williams A, Matthews S, Arshad SH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 18;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for plane pollen associated peach allergy.
Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) are considered to provoke allergic symptoms to plane tree pollen, which are frequently associated with peach allergy. The objective was to clone the cDNA of plane pollen nsLTP Pla a 3, to characterize IgE-binding and allergenic potency of recombinant Pla a 3 in comparison to its natural counterpart and peach nsLTP Pru p 3. Two Pla a 3 isoforms were identified. Recombinant Pla a 3 showed IgE-binding capacity comparable to nPla a 3 and biological potency. Sensitization to plane pollen extract was confirmed in 24/25 plane pollen allergics. The frequency of sensitization to Pla a 3 was 53% among patients allergic to both plane pollen and peach and 10% among plane pollen allergics tolerating peach where most patients were sensitized to Pla a 1. Pla a 3 and Pru p 3 showed strong bi-directional IgE cross-reactivity in patients allergic to peach and plane pollen, but not in peach allergics tolerating plane pollen. Levels of IgE-binding were generally higher to Pru p 3 than to Pla a 3.

Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for plane pollen associated peach allergy.  
Wangorsch A, Larsson H, Messmer M, Garcia-Moral A, Lauer I, Wolfheimer S, Schulke S, Bartra J, Vieths S, Lidholm J, Scheurer S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Feb 19;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: evaluation and management.
PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs

Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: evaluation and management.  
Otani IM, Banerji A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Feb;16(3):17

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of Sola l 4 as Bet v 1 homologous pathogenesis related-10 allergen in tomato fruits.
The aim of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of a major birch pollen Bet v 1-homologous allergen to birch pollen-associated tomato fruit allergy. Two isoforms of a Bet v 1-homologous protein (designated Sola l 4) from tomato fruit were identified and produced as recombinant proteins. Allergen-specific IgE levels to tomato, birch pollen, Bet v 1, and Sola l 4 were determined in birch pollen allergic patients with allergy or tolerance to tomato. Sola l 4 was recognized in 76% of birch/tomato allergic patients, while tomato- and Bet v 1-specific IgE was detectable in 64% and 81% of sera. Almost all patients sensitized to Bet v 1 reacted with Sola l 4. Both Sola l 4 isoforms displayed allergenic potency and IgE-cross-reactivity with Bet v 1. Nevertheless, the reactivity pattern of patients' sera was diverse. Sola l 4, a novel pathogenesis related-10 protein, qualifies as major allergen in tomato fruits. Data suggest Sola l 4 as class II allergen. IgE-testing using Sola l 4 showed low clinical specificity, but high sensitivity in tomato allergic patients and will further improve component-resolved allergy diagnosis. (Wangorsch ref.31522 7)

Identification of Sola l 4 as Bet v 1 homologous pathogenesis related-10 allergen in tomato fruits.  
Wangorsch A, Jamin A, Foetisch K, Malczyk A, Reuter A, Vierecke S, Schülke S, Bartel D, Mahler V, Lidholm J, Vieths S, Scheurer S.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2015 Mar;59(3):582-92.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunological behavior of in vitro digested egg-white lysozyme.
The pH of gastric hydrolysis greatly determined the extent of subsequent duodenal digestion of lysozyme and the disclosure of relevant epitopes that could increase its allergenic potential

Immunological behavior of in vitro digested egg-white lysozyme.  
Jimenez-Saiz R, Benede S, Miralles B, Lopez-Exposito I, Molina E, Lopez-Fandino R.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Mar;58(3):614-624

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lack of uniformity in the investigation and management of suspected beta-Lactam Allergy in children.
This study concludes that there is lack of consistency amongst clinicians in different countries in the diagnosis and management of suspected beta-lactam allergy. The development of a standardized approach is a priority.

Lack of uniformity in the investigation and management of suspected beta-Lactam Allergy in children.  
Foong RM, Logan K, Perkin MR, du TG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 26;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to pneumococcal vaccine; CRM(197): Novel cause of vaccine allergy.
A healthy 12 month old infant without any prior significant diseases developed anaphylaxis (urticaria and new-onset wheezing) after receiving simultaneously the 3rd dose of MnC (meningococcal C), 4th dose of PCV-13 ([Prevenar-13]) and 1st dose of MMR (mumps, measles and rubella) vaccines during the 1st year well-child visit. Skin tests with the suspected vaccines were performed 3 weeks after the episode. After negative results, intradermal (ID) tests were carried out. Besides, a basophil activation test (BAT) using CD63 as a marker for activated basophils was performed. Skin prick tests were negative with all the vaccines. ID tests were positive with PCV-13 and both DTP vaccines. BAT was positive with PCV-13 and both DTP variants. PPV-23 tested negative. CRM(197) (Cross-reactive material 197) appears to be the culprit. Non-toxic diphtheria mutant toxin (cross-reactive material 197 [CRM(197)] are currently used as carrier proteins in conjugated vaccines to enhance the infants' immune response against capsulated bacteria. Allergic reactions to vaccines can be due to different substances other than the immunizing antigen itself, such as antibiotics, stabilizers, preservatives, adjuvants, etc.

Anaphylaxis to pneumococcal vaccine; CRM(197): Novel cause of vaccine allergy.  
Arroabarren E, Anda M, Sanz ML.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 4;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Direct oral provocation tests in non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions related to beta-lactam antibiotics.
We did not experience any severe reactions during oral provocation test without previous skin tests performed to children with non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions without systemic symptoms. Omitting skin tests before oral provocation test in this group of children can help decreasing the burden of allergy clinics and alleviating the discomfort of children

Direct oral provocation tests in non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions related to beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Vezir E, Dibek ME, Civelek E, Capanoglu M, Guvenir H, Ginis T, Toyran M, Kocabas CN.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb;27(1):50-54

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A further wheat allergen for baker's asthma: Tri a 40.
A further wheat allergen for baker's asthma: Tri a 40. The purified natural protein had previously been found to bind IgE of approximately 30% of Spanish bakers with wheat flour allergy and asthma. A recombinant protein was cloned. It's amino acid sequence is 88% identical to the CM16 subunit of WTAI, which had been described as a major allergen in its natural form; 47% identical to the CM2 subunit (WTAI-CM2, Tri a 29.0201); 46% identical to WTAI-CM1 (Tri a 29.0101); and 44% identical to WTAI-CM3 (Tri a 30.0101). Sera of 94 bakers with wheat flour allergy and asthma, rhinitis, or both (37 German, 36 Dutch, and 21 Spanish bakers) and 27 pollen-sensitized control subjects with wheat-specific IgE but without occupational exposure were tested for specific IgE to this protein. Sera from 8 bakers (2 German, 4 Dutch, and 2 Spanish bakers) and 4 control subjects had specific IgE values of 0.35 kU/L or greater. Only 1 of these bakers was monosensitized to this allergen; the others had IgE to other recombinant wheat flour allergens, namely other components of wheat a-amylase inhibitors. In conclusion, WTAI-CM17 is an additional minor allergen for bakers with wheat flour allergy and was named Tri a 40.0101. Addition of this allergen to the panel of recombinant allergen components had only minimal influence on diagnostic sensitivity and could not improve specificity.

A further wheat allergen for baker's asthma: Tri a 40.  
Sander I, Rihs HP, Bruning T, Raulf M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 1;

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

A lurking threat: transfer of peanut allergy through peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.  
Brauns B, Schon MP, Wulf G, Mempel M.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;93
Click to view abstract

Prime and boost aerosol exposure via fog machine or shisha smoke followed by cinnamon hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis to spiced food.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Roth-Walter F, Leitner E, Buchleitner S, Vogelsang H, Kinaciyan T.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;94
Click to view abstract

Debates in allergy medicine: baked milk and egg ingestion accelerates resolution of milk and egg allergy.  
Leonard SA.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;91
Click to view abstract

Cross-reactivity between major IgE core epitopes on Cry j 2 allergen of Japanese cedar pollen and relevant sequences on Cha o 2 allergen of Japanese cypress pollen.  
Miyaji K, Okamoto N, Saito A, Yasueda H, Takase Y, Shimakura H, Saito S, Sakaguchi M.
Allergol Int 2016 Feb 22;
Click to view abstract

Study of the cross-reactivity of fish allergens based on a questionnaire and blood testing.  
Kobayashi Y, Huge J, Imamura S, Hamada-Sato N.
Allergol Int 2016 Feb 11;
Click to view abstract

Helminths are positively associated with atopy and wheeze in Ugandan fishing communities: results from a cross-sectional survey.  
Webb EL, Nampijja M, Kaweesa J, Kizindo R, Namutebi M, Nakazibwe E, Oduru G, Kabubi P, Kabagenyi J, Nkurunungi G, Kizito D, Muhangi L, Akello M, Verweij JJ, Nerima B, Tukahebwa E, Elliott AM.
Allergy 2016 Feb 25;
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Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis: An EAACI Position paper.  
Quirce S, Vandenplas O, Campo P, Cruz MJ, de Blay F, Koschel D, Moscato G7, Pala G8, M R9, Sastre J0, Siracusa A, Tarlo SM, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Cormier Y.
Allergy 2016 Feb 23;
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Early weaning is beneficial to prevent atopic dermatitis occurrence in young children.  
Turati F, Bertuccio P, Galeone C, Pelucchi C, Naldi L, Bach JF, La VC, Chatenoud L.
Allergy 2016 Feb 19;
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Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to ibuprofen and other arylpropionic acid derivatives.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Perez-Alzate D, Andreu I, Dona I, Agundez JA, Garcia-Martin E, Salas M, Miranda MA, Torres MJ, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Blanca M, Canto G.
Allergy 2016 Feb 3;
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of sensitisation to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.  
Jones M, Welch J, Turvey J, Cannon J, Clark P, Szram J, Cullinan P.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;
Click to view abstract

Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well-tolerated by egg allergic patients.  
Ballmer-Weber BK, Brockow K, Fiocchi A, Theler B, Vogel L, Ring J, Szepfalusi Z, Mazzina O, Schaller R, Fritsche R, Vissers YM, Nutten S.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;
Click to view abstract

Added sensitivity of component-resolved diagnosis in hymenoptera venom-allergic patients with elevated serum tryptase and/or mastocytosis.  
Michel J, Brockow K, Darsow U, Ring J, Schmidt-Weber CB, Grunwald T, Blank S, Ollert M.
Allergy 2016 Feb 2;
Click to view abstract

Role of specific IgE to beta-lactoglobulin in the gastrointestinal phenotype of cow's milk allergy.  
Poza-Guedes P, Barrios Y, Gonzalez-Perez R, Sanchez-Machin I, Franco A, Matheu V.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;127
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Involvement of Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis in Japanese cedar pollinosis.  
Otsuka H, Takanashi I, Tokunou S, Endo S, Okubo K.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2016 Feb 12;
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Anaphylaxis to polymyxin B-trimethoprim eye drops.  
Henao MP, Ghaffari G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 25;

Impact of an extended challenge on the effectiveness of beta-lactam hypersensitivity investigation.  
Ratzon R, Reshef A, Efrati O, Deutch M, Forschmidt R, Cukierman-Yaffe T, Kenett R, Kidon MI.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 25;
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Angioedema due to allergy in a patient with hereditary angioedema: all that glitters is not gold.  
Eastman J, Zuraw B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 23;

Pollinosis to tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and detection of allergenic proteins: a case report.  
Mousavi F, Majd A, Shahali Y, Ghahremaninejad F, Kardar G, Pourpak Z.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 20;

Evaluating a handbook for parents of children with food allergy: a randomized clinical trial.  
LeBovidge JS, Michaud A, Deleon A, Harada L, Waserman S, Schneider L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb 3;
Click to view abstract

A Colorado allergist's experience with marijuana legalization.  
Silvers WS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;116(2):175-177

How many systemic reactions to skin prick tests could be preventable in defined conditions?  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Calzetta L, Piccolo A, Rogliani P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;116(2):174

High prevalence of Anisakis simplex hypersensitivity and allergy in Sicily, Italy.  
Heffler E, Sberna ME, Sichili S, Intravaia R, Nicolosi G, Porto M, Liuzzo MT, Picardi G, Fichera S, Crimi N.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;116(2):146-150
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Counseling patients with asthma and allergy about electronic cigarettes: an evidence-based approach.  
Polosa R, Campagna D, Sands MF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Feb;116(2):106-111
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Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model.  
Nunez NK, da Cunha AA, Dos Santos DM, Barbosa GL, Morassutti AL, de Souza RG, Vargas MH, Antunes GL, Silveira JS, da Silva GL, Pitrez PM.
Asia Pac Allergy 2016 Jan;6(1):48-55
Click to view abstract

Specific IgE to recombinant protein (Ber e 1) for the diagnosis of Brazil nut allergy.  
Rayes H, Abid RA, Williams A, Matthews S, Arshad SH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Dec 18;

High-dose cutaneous exposure to mite allergen induces IgG-mediated protection against anaphylaxis.  
Hirai T, Yoshioka Y, Takahashi H, Handa T, Izumi N, Mori T, Uemura E, Nishijima N, Sagami KI, Yamaguchi M, Eto SI, Nagano K, Kamada H, Tsunoda SI, Ishii KJ, Higashisaka K, Tsutsumi Y.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Feb 19;
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Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for plane pollen associated peach allergy.  
Wangorsch A, Larsson H, Messmer M, Garcia-Moral A, Lauer I, Wolfheimer S, Schulke S, Bartra J, Vieths S, Lidholm J, Scheurer S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Feb 19;
Click to view abstract

'Does providing written dietary advice improve the ingestion of non-allergic nuts in children with existing nut allergies? - A Randomised Controlled Trial.'.  
Norman M, South C, Quinn P, Chan D, Palmer S, Netting M, Gold M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Feb 18;
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Prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and offspring allergic sensitization and lung function at 20 years of age.  
Hansen S, Strom M, Olsen SF, Dahl R, Hoffmann HJ, Granstrom C, Rytter D, Bech BH, Linneberg A, Maslova E, Kiviranta H, Rantakokko P, Halldorsson TI.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Feb;46(2):329-336
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Quality of life in patients with food allergy.  
Antolín-Amérigo D, Manso L, Caminati M, de la Hoz Caballer B, Cerecedo I, Muriel A, Rodríguez-Rodríguez M, Barbarroja-Escudero J, Sánchez-González MJ, Huertas-Barbudo B, Alvarez-Mon M.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;144
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Measurement and interpretation of skin prick test results.  
van der Valk JP, Gerth van WR, Hoorn E, Groenendijk L, Groenendijk IM, de Jong NW.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;68
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Wheat allergy and intolerence; recent updates and perspectives.  
Pasha I, Saeed F, Sultan MT, Batool R, Aziz M, Ahmed W.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2016 Jan 2;56(1):13-24.
Abstract

Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: evaluation and management.  
Otani IM, Banerji A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Feb;16(3):17
Click to view abstract

Allergen-encoded signals that control allergic responses.  
Tung HY, Landers C, Li E, Porter P, Kheradmand F, Corry DB.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb;16(1):51-58
Click to view abstract

Baked milk and egg diets for milk and egg allergy management.  
Leonard SA, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2016 Feb;36(1):147-159
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An adjuvant-free mouse model of transdermal sensitization and oral elicitation of anaphylaxis to shellfish.  
Parvataneni S, Gonipeta B, Acharya HG, Gangur V.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 20;168(4):269-276
Click to view abstract

Role of histamine release test for the evaluation of patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to clavulanic acid.  
Pineda F, Ariza A, Mayorga C, Arribas F, Gonzalez-Mendiola R, Blanca-Lopez N, Davila G, Cabanes N, Canto G, Laguna JJ, Senent C, Stahl-Skov P, Palacios R, Blanca M, Torres MJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 20;168(4):233-240
Click to view abstract

Identification of Sola l 4 as Bet v 1 homologous pathogenesis related-10 allergen in tomato fruits.  
Wangorsch A, Jamin A, Foetisch K, Malczyk A, Reuter A, Vierecke S, Schülke S, Bartel D, Mahler V, Lidholm J, Vieths S, Scheurer S.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2015 Mar;59(3):582-92.

New shrimp IgE-binding proteins involved in mite-seafood cross-reactivity.  
Gámez C1, Zafra M, Boquete M, Sanz V, Mazzeo C, Ibáñez MD, Sánchez-García S, Sastre J, del Pozo V.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Sep;58(9):1915-1925

Immunological behavior of in vitro digested egg-white lysozyme.  
Jimenez-Saiz R, Benede S, Miralles B, Lopez-Exposito I, Molina E, Lopez-Fandino R.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Mar;58(3):614-624

Sensitizing potential of enzymatically cross-linked peanut proteins in a mouse model of peanut allergy.  
Radosavljevic J, Nordlund E, Mihajlovic L, Krstic M, Bohn T, Buchert J, Velickovic TC, Smit J.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Mar;58(3):635-646

IgE to novel citrus seed allergens among cashew allergic children.  
Brandstrom J, Lilja G, Nilsson C, Ingemarsson N, Borres MP, Brostedt P, Englund H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 17;
Click to view abstract

Symptoms suggestive of Cow's milk allergy in infancy and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.  
Virta LJ, Kautiainen H, Kolho KL.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 17;
Click to view abstract

School personnel's self-efficacy in managing food allergy and anaphylaxis.  
Polloni L, Baldi I, Lazzarotto F, Bonaguro R, Toniolo A, Celegato N, Gregori D, Muraro A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 17;
Click to view abstract

Lack of uniformity in the investigation and management of suspected beta-Lactam Allergy in children.  
Foong RM, Logan K, Perkin MR, du TG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 26;
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Immediate hypersensitivity to extensively hydrolyzed formulas: an important reminder.  
Chauveau A, Nguyen-Grosjean VM, Jacquenet S, Richard C, Mouton-Faivre C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 26;
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Anaphylaxis to pneumococcal vaccine; CRM(197): Novel cause of vaccine allergy.  
Arroabarren E, Anda M, Sanz ML.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 4;
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Dust mite allergen Der f 4: Expression, characterization, and IgE-binding in pediatric asthma.  
Cui YB, Yu LL, Teng FX, Wang N, Zhou Y, Yang L, Zhang CB.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 4;
Click to view abstract

Prospective investigation on the transfer of Ara h 2, the most potent peanut allergen, in human breast milk.  
Schocker F, Baumert J, Kull S, Petersen A, Becker WM, Jappe U.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb 4;
Click to view abstract

Direct oral provocation tests in non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions related to beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Vezir E, Dibek ME, Civelek E, Capanoglu M, Guvenir H, Ginis T, Toyran M, Kocabas CN.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Feb;27(1):50-54
Click to view abstract

Environmental challenge: An effective approach for diagnosis and remediation of exacerbations of hypersensitivity pneumonitis.  
Jacobs MR, Jacobs RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Feb 13;

A predictive model for the diagnosis of allergic drug reactions according to the medical history.  
Hierro SB, Mateos CJ, Cabero Moran MT, Miron Canelo JA, Armentia MA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Feb 3;
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Does atopic dermatitis cause food allergy? A systematic review.  
Tsakok T, Marrs T, Mohsin M, Baron S, du TG, Till S, Flohr C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 18;
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Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study: Feasibility of an early allergenic food introduction regimen.  
Perkin MR, Logan K, Marrs T, Radulovic S, Craven J, Flohr C, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 16;
Click to view abstract

Calculating the effect of population-level implementation of the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) protocol to prevent peanut allergy.  
O'Connor C, Kelleher M, O'B Hourihane J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 10;

A further wheat allergen for baker's asthma: Tri a 40.  
Sander I, Rihs HP, Bruning T, Raulf M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb 1;

Analysis of cross-reactivity among radiocontrast media in 97 hypersensitivity reactions.  
Lerondeau B, Trechot P, Waton J, Poreaux C, Luc A, Schmutz JL, Paris C, Barbaud A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb;137(2):633-635

Ole e 1, Ole e 7, and Ole e 9: Identifying distinct clinical subsets of olive tree-allergic patients.  
Scala E, Abeni D, Pomponi D, Paganelli R, Locanto M, Giani M, Cecchi L, Asero R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Feb;137(2):629-631


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