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 Allergy Advisor Digest - July 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Royal jelly allergy.
Read Climate change and aeroallergens in South Africa
Read Omega-5 gliadin anaphylaxis: an integrated diagnostic approach.
Read Delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome)
Read Has allergenic pollen an impact on non-allergic diseases?
Read Open oral food challenge in the confirmation of cow's milk allergy mediated by immunoglobulin E.
Read Macadamia nut allergy: potentially misleading specific IgE results.
Read The high prevalence of peanut sensitization in childhood is due to cross-reactivity to pollen.
Read Cow's milk allergy as a cause of anaphylaxis to systemic corticosteroids.
Read Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - classification, diagnosis and management: a review.
Read Ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulins A and G levels at age 2 years are associated with the occurrence of atopic disorders.
Read Immunoglobulin-E-binding epitopes of wheat allergens in patients with food allergy to wheat and in mice experimentally sensitized to wheat proteins.
Read Cat allergen-induced blood basophil reactivity in vitro predicts acute human nasal allergen challenge responses in vivo.
Read A new approach to the isolation and characterization of wheat flour allergens.
Read Comparison of component-based microarray versus fluorescent enzimoimmunoassay in the diagnosis of grass and cypress pollen allergy.
Read Overview of penicillin allergy.
Read Deodorants are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis to fragrance ingredients.
Read Allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis among children
Read Airway response to chlorine inhalation (bleach) among cleaning workers with and without bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
Read Severe bronchospasm using Diprivan in a patient allergic to peanut and birch.
Read Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a major allergen in rambutan-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Anaphylaxis to Mopane worms (Imbrasia belina).
Read Occupational contact allergy in the building trade in Germany
Read Plant lipid transfer protein allergens: no cross-reactivity between those from foods and olive and parietaria pollen.
Read Evaluation of IgE antibodies to recombinant peanut allergens in patients with reported reactions to peanut.
Read Influence of processing on the allergenic properties of pistachio nut.
Read Biofortification of soybean meal: immunological properties of the 27 kDa gamma-zein.
Read High molecular weight entities in industrial wheat protein hydrolysates are immunoreactive with IgE from allergic patients.
Read New-onset asthma and the effect of environment and occupation among farming and nonfarming rural subjects.
Read Mango contact allergy.
Read Pruritic dermatitis on an oil tanker after a visit to French Guyana.
Read Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms.
Read Identification of methionine synthase (Sal k 3), as a novel allergen of Salsola kali pollen.
Read Tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta (Razor clam).
Read Allergens in Brassica nigra (black mustard)
Read Mango profilin: cloning, expression and cross-reactivity with birch pollen profilin Bet v 2.
Read Food processing increases casein resistance to simulated infant digestion.
Read Effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on lentil allergenicity.
Read Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of Lep w 1, the major allergen of whiff.
Read Molecular Allergy in Practice: exploration of a patient with exercise anaphylaxis
Read Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis: a New Zealand experience.
Read Glutaraldehyde-modified recombinant Fel d 1
Read Climate change, migration, and allergic respiratory diseases: an update for the allergist

Abstracts shared in July 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Contact dermatitis in the plastic industry – a case series.
Read Hypersensitivity to oleaceae pollen in an olive-free and ash-free area by commercial pollen extracts and recombinant allergens.
Read Chronic palpable purpura mediated by Kiwi antigen Act c 1-induced immune complex vasculitis.
Read Cutaneous adverse drug reactions caused by delayed sensitization to carboxymethylcellulose.
Read Cloning, expression and patient IgE reactivity of recombinant Pru du 6, an 11s globulin from almond.
Read Aggravation of atopic dermatitis in breast-fed infants by tree nut-related foods and fermented foods in breast milk.
Read Cloning and characterization of 11s legumin, Car I 4, a major allergen in pecan.
Read Anaphylaxis in an airplane after insecticide spraying.
Read Isolation, cloning, and characterization of the 2S albumin: a new allergen from hazelnut.
Read Latex anaphylaxis enhanced by oxytocin during childbirth

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Royal jelly allergy.
Two young women experienced symptoms after the intake of royal jelly for their first time. Skin prick test was postive for raw royal jelly. The authors postulated that 1) they had prior sensitisation to royal jelly, or 2) symptoms were induced by cross-reactivity between royal jelly and other allergens such as bee, honey and pollens. No related allergens were found in one case, but in the other co-existence of mugwort allergy was suggested by skin prick test and specific IgE.

Two cases of royal jelly allergy provoked the symptoms at the time of their first intake. [Japanese]  
Harada S, Moriyama T, Tanaka A.
Arerugi 2011 Jun;60(6):708-713

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Climate change and aeroallergens in South Africa
Climate change and its effects on aeroallergens and allergic disease have been extensively studied in the northern hemisphere, but there has been a dearth of similar studies in the southern hemisphere. Aeroallergens are extremely sensitive to certain weather parameters and changes may increase or decrease their levels in the atmosphere. Climate change projections include global warming, an increase in extreme weather events and greater volumes of rain. Alterations in the carbon dioxide levels, mean temperature, relative humidity and wetting of the nine distinct climate zones in South Africa will affect the vegetation distribution, causing shifts which will disturb the balance of their ecosystems. These changes will have a profound effect on aeroallergens such as pollen, fungal spores, house-dust mite and cockroach, each of which have specific climatic requirements. Changes to climatic conditions could extend the pollen season of allergenic plants and increase the concentration of allergenic pollen in the air. Increased relative humidity and temperature could increase the levels of house-dust mites and fungal spores. There is a concerted call by northern hemisphere researchers for greater emphasis on pollen and fungal spore testing in clinical practice and for the standardised collection of aerobiological data worldwide, in order to meet the anticipated changes.

Climate change and aeroallergens in South Africa  
D Berman
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2011;24(2):65-73

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Omega-5 gliadin anaphylaxis: an integrated diagnostic approach.
A 62-year old man presented with wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). The case illustrates the usefulness of skin prick test not only with wheat extract, but also with native gliadin extract. The authors also confirm the value of evaluation using rTri a 19 omega-5 gliadin for diagnosis.

Omega-5 gliadin anaphylaxis: an integrated diagnostic approach.  
Yacoub MR, Savi E, Burastero SE, Dal FS, Mason C, Pecora S, Colombo G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):92-94

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome)
"Delusional parasitosis (DP) or Ekbom's syndrome is uncommon psychiatric disorder that may represent a challenge for the allergist. DP is characterized by the fixed belief to be infested with parasites or small living creatures, although there is no medical evidence for this. The management of this condition is difficult, as patients with this paranoid disorder reject psychiatric diagnosis and treatment and often consult many specialists (dermatologists, internists or allergists). The patients may also share the delusional disease with other people living in close emotional relationship. We report herein a delusion of parasitosis simultaneously occurring in two spouses, and discuss the clinical features of the disease."

When allergology meets psychiatry: delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome).  
Lombardi C, Belli D, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):89-91

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Has allergenic pollen an impact on non-allergic diseases?
"Recent observations suggest that pollen do not only interacts with the human immune system to elicit an allergic response in susceptible individuals. It would have a much broader impact on human health. This applies more especially, yet not exclusively, to three groups of diseases: non-allergic respiratory conditions, cardio- and cerebrovascular accidents, and psychiatric disorders including suicide and suicide attempt. At present, the reasons for these unexpected connections are only hypothetical, and require further exploration in larger samples, but there is perhaps a multitude of them. One must therefore favour a holistic approach of pollen and its impact on human health."

Has allergenic pollen an impact on non-allergic diseases?  
Besancenot JP, Thibaudon M, Cecchi L.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):69-76

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Open oral food challenge in the confirmation of cow's milk allergy mediated by immunoglobulin E.
The aim of this study was to describe the open oral food challenge applied to children with suspicion of cow's milk allergy mediated by immunoglobulin E, and evaluate the relation between the clinical history and skin prick test with the challenge outcomes. Forty-six children (median age 13.8 months), with clinical history of immediate reactions to cow's milk and positive skin prick test, underwent an open oral food challenge with cow's milk. The challenge was positive in 41.3%. Cutaneous reactions were the most common (73.7%), followed by respiratory (57.9%) and gastrointestinal reactions (36.8%). According to the severity of the reactions, 57.9%, 36.8% and 5.3% had mild, moderate and severe reactions, respectively. The method was considered suitable for children up to three years of age, and is safe and easy to perform. There was a significant correlation between the clinical history and the challenge outcomes. A positive skin prick test with total milk and casein was significantly associated with positive challenge results.

Open oral food challenge in the confirmation of cow's milk allergy mediated by immunoglobulin E.  
Bicudo MR, Motta FJ, Rodrigues CR, Suano de Souza FI, Lopes de Oliveira LC, Saccardo Sarni RO, Sole D.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jul 11;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Macadamia nut allergy: potentially misleading specific IgE results.
A 4-year-old boy with a history of mild eczema presented with allergic symptoms after chewing and swallowing a single macadamia nut. Minutes after swallowing this, he developed a funny taste in his mouth, swelling of his eyes, became upset and started to cry. Examination confirmed wheezing. Total IgE was 113 kU/l. Specific IgE to almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazel nuts, peanuts and walnuts was <0.10 kUA/l. Specific IgE to macadamia nuts was 0.21 kUA/l. Skin prick test (SPT) with fresh macadamia nut elicited a 7-mm weal confirming macadamia allergy. In this case, the positive SPT supports the diagnosis of macadamia nut allergy, which may have been missed if the specific IgE test results had been read in isolation.

Macadamia nut allergy: potentially misleading specific IgE results.  
Ekbote A, Hayman G, Bansal A.
Allergy 2010 Mar 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The high prevalence of peanut sensitization in childhood is due to cross-reactivity to pollen.
The large German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents enrolled 17 641 children, aged 0–17 years, from 167 communities all over Germany. Specific IgE concentrations to common aeroallergens and foods (ImmunoCAP) were determined in 13 100 children aged 3–17 years. The study showed that 40.8% of children were sensitized to any of the tested allergens. Especially remarkable was the prevalence of 10.9% sensitization to peanut. our data indicate that the high sensitization of 10.9% to peanut is predominantly due to crossreactivity to pollen – irrespective of the age of the children. The observed high peanut sensitization therefore does not indicate a high risk for the development of primary allergy to peanut. (Niggemann 2011 ref.26426 5)

The high prevalence of peanut sensitization in childhood is due to cross-reactivity to pollen.  
Niggemann B, Schmitz R, Schlaud M.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):980-1.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow's milk allergy as a cause of anaphylaxis to systemic corticosteroids.
Cow's milk allergy as a cause of anaphylaxis to systemic corticosteroids. A 9-year-old boy with a history of severe persistent cow’s milk allergy (CMA) presented with fever, wheezing & moderate dyspnea. He was administered nebulized salbutamol, as well as 40 mg of methylprednisolone by intravenous injection. Within a few minutes the patient acutely collapsed, with hypotension, cyanosis and respiratory arrest. Another patient, a 7-year-old boy with severe CMA was similarly treated with salbutamol and intravenous administration of 40 mg methyl-prednisolone. This resulted in a full-blown anaphylactic reaction, with aggravation of dyspnea & wheezing, immediate urticarial rash, emesis and ultimately hypotension. Subsequent testing of corticosteroids by skin prick test was skin test positive exclusively to lactose-containing preparations. A highly sensitive ELISA assay (Veratox Total Milk Elisa kit, limit of detection = 0.5 ppm) detected traces of milk proteins, within the range of 2.0–3.5 ppm, in samples from all five batches tested of the implicated product.

Cow's milk allergy as a cause of anaphylaxis to systemic corticosteroids.  
Savvatianos S, Giavi S, Stefanaki E, Siragakis G, Manousakis E, Papadopoulos NG.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):983-5.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - classification, diagnosis and management: a review.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are responsible for 21-25% of reported adverse drug events which include immunological and nonimmunological hypersensitivity reactions. This study presents up-to-date information on pathomechanisms, clinical spectrum, diagnostic tools and management of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. Clinically, NSAID hypersensitivity is particularly manifested by bronchial asthma, rhinosinusitis, anaphylaxis or urticaria and variety of late cutaneous and organ-specific reactions. Diagnosis of hypersensitivity to a NSAID includes understanding of the underlying mechanism and is necessary for prevention and management. A stepwise approach to the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to NSAIDs is proposed, including clinical history, in vitro testing and/or provocation test with a culprit or alternative drug depending on the type of the reaction. The diagnostic process should result in providing the patient with written information both on forbidden and on alternative drugs.

Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - classification, diagnosis and management: review of the EAACI/ENDA(#) and GA2LEN/HANNA*.  
Kowalski ML, Makowska JS, Blanca M, Bavbek S, Bochenek G, Bousquet J, Bousquet P, Celik G, Demoly P, Gomes ER, Nizankowska-Mogilnicka E, Romano A, Sanchez-Borges M, Sanz M, Torres MJ, De WA, .
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):818-829

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulins A and G levels at age 2 years are associated with the occurrence of atopic disorders.
Humoral responses to food antigens may reflect the propensity of a child's immune system to develop tolerance to innocuous antigens. Early nutrition as well as probiotics may influence these immunological responses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of humoral responses to early food antigens with the administration of prebiotics and probiotics, with the occurrence of allergy, and with the length of exclusive breastfeeding. The study concludes that allergy was associated with more intense IgA and IgG responses to OVA. Breastfeeding depressed humoral responses, whereas prebiotics and probiotics supplementation showed no immunomodulatory effect. The effect of probiotics on allergies is not mediated through food-specific antibody responses. Furthermore, OVA-specific IgA and IgG antibodies may help in assessing the risk for atopy.

Ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulins A and G levels at age 2 years are associated with the occurrence of atopic disorders.  
Kukkonen AK, Savilahti EM, Haahtela T, Savilahti E, Kuitunen M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunoglobulin-E-binding epitopes of wheat allergens in patients with food allergy to wheat and in mice experimentally sensitized to wheat proteins.
At present, B cell epitopes involved in food allergy to wheat are known only for a few allergens and a few categories of patients. This study characterized the epitopes of different wheat kernel allergens: alpha-, gamma, omega2, and omega5-gliadin, a low-molecular-weight (LMW) glutenin subunit, and a lipid transfer protein (LTP1) recognized by allergic patients and by sensitized mice and provide further understanding of the role of structure in determining allergic response.

Sera were obtained from 39 patients suffering from food allergy to wheat. BALB/c mice were sensitized to gliadins or LTP1 by intraperitoneal immunizations. Continuous epitopes bound by IgE were delineated. Few continuous epitopes of LTP1 reacted with IgE from allergic patients and mice, but one of them was common to several patients and sensitized mice. The unfolded protein was not recognized by either patient or mouse IgE, emphasizing the major role of LTP1 folding and discontinuous epitopes in IgE-binding. In contrast, many continuous epitopes were detected by patient and mouse IgE especially for an omega5-gliadin, which is an unstructured protein, and to a lesser extent, for the other gliadins and a LMW-glutenin subunit. Therefore the conformation of LTP1 appeared to have a strong impact on the type of IgE-binding epitopes elicited by this protein in both man and mouse.

Immunoglobulin-E-binding epitopes of wheat allergens in patients with food allergy to wheat and in mice experimentally sensitized to wheat proteins.  
Denery-Papini S, Bodinier M, Pineau F, Triballeau S, Tranquet O, Adel-Patient K, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Bakan B, Marion D, Mothes T, Mameri H, Kasarda D.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cat allergen-induced blood basophil reactivity in vitro predicts acute human nasal allergen challenge responses in vivo.
Among subjects reporting respiratory cat allergy, the authors hypothesized that cat-induced BHR in vitro would predict nasal allergen challenge (NAC) response in that same individual. The study found that a positive cat allergen-induced BHR is associated with higher cat-specific IgE levels, a higher cat-specific to total IgE ratio and is predictive of a positive cat-induced NAC.

Cat allergen-induced blood basophil reactivity in vitro predicts acute human nasal allergen challenge responses in vivo.  
Paterniti M, Kelly DC, Eckman JA, Sterba PM, Hamilton RG, Bochner BS, Macglashan DW, Saini SS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):963-969

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A new approach to the isolation and characterization of wheat flour allergens.
The objective of this study was to purify and identify wheat flour allergens most frequently recognized by patients' IgE antibodies and to study their allergenicity. The authors developed a procedure that allows isolation of wheat allergens from natural sources. Twenty-seven potential wheat allergens were successfully identified; of these, the following seven are newly reported in food allergy: endogenous alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, trypsin/alpha-amylase inhibitor (AAI) CMX1/CMX3, thaumatin-like protein (TLP), xylanase inhibitor protein-1, beta-glucosidase, class II chitinase and 26 kDa endochitinase. TLP and wheatwin were shown to activate patients' basophils to a similar extent as two well-known allergens, lipid transfer protein (Tri a 14) and AAI 0.19 (Tri a 28.0101).

A new approach to the isolation and characterization of wheat flour allergens.  
Sotkovsky P, Sklenar J, Halada P, Cinova J, Setinova I, Kainarova A, Golias J, Pavlaskova K, Honzova S, Tuckova L.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):1031-1043

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Comparison of component-based microarray versus fluorescent enzimoimmunoassay in the diagnosis of grass and cypress pollen allergy.
The aim of this study was to compare the ISAC CRD103 with the whole-extract ImmunoCAP in grass and cypress pollen allergy in 120 atopic patients grouped into grass and cypress pollen-allergic patients based on clinical history and skin prick tests. Specific IgE against Phleum pratense and Cupressus arizonica by ImmunoCAP and ISAC CRD103 were performed on all subjects. In the grass pollen group (43 allergic/26 controls), both microarray and CAP showed high sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) values (ISAC: Se 97.7, Sp 92.3; CAP: Se 95.3, Sp 96.1) for recommended cut-off points. Comparing the optimal (ISAC: 0.4 ISU; CAP: 0.33 kU/L) with the recommended cut-off points within the same technique, diagnostic agreement was observed in both techniques. Thus, CAP and ISAC showed similar diagnostic performance in grass pollen allergy when using recommended cut-off points. In cypress pollen group (12 allergic/92 controls), the microarray (Se: 91.7, Sp 91.3) showed similar Se but significantly higher Sp (P=0.034) than CAP (Se: 91.7, Sp: 80.4) using recommended cut-off points. However, although diagnostic performance of the microarray did not change when comparing the optimal (0.82 ISU) with the recommended cut-off point, CAP improved diagnosis of cypress pollen allergy, when applying the optimal (0.66 kU/L)(CAP Se: 91.7, Sp: 89.1) instead of the manufacturer's recommended cut-off point. Thus, when the most suitable cut-off point for both techniques (ISAC: 0.3 ISU; CAP: 0.66 kU/L) is selected, microarray and CAP provide equivalent diagnoses.

Can component-based microarray replace fluorescent enzimoimmunoassay in the diagnosis of grass and cypress pollen allergy?  
Cabrera-Freitag P, Goikoetxea MJ, Beorlegui C, Gamboa P, Gastaminza G, Fernandez-Benitez M, Ferrer M, Blanca M, Sanz ML.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 13;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Overview of penicillin allergy.
"Allergy to penicillin is the most commonly reported antibiotic allergy. However, most patients who report a positive history of a prior reaction to penicillin are not found to be allergic to penicillin upon skin testing. Often, this history is vague or based on a parent's recollection of an event that occurred in the distant past. Avoidance of penicillin based on self-reported allergic history alone often leads to the use of an alternate antibiotic with greater cost or side effect profile. Patients with a negative skin test to both major and minor determinants may generally be given penicillin, with a statistical risk of developing an allergic reaction similar to that observed in the general population. A more cautious approach in these cases where the degree of suspicion is low, an allergic etiology is unproven, or there is a negative skin test, is to do a graded challenge. If the skin test is positive, an alternate antibiotic should be used. If, however, an alternate antibiotic is not available, then desensitization may be performed, but there are limitations to desensitization as well, and tolerance is not permanent. Avoidance of cephalosporins may be recommended in cases of penicillin allergy, but newer generation cephalosporins have demonstrate less cross-reactivity to penicillin than earlier generation ones. Desensitization protocols for cephalosporins are available but not standardized. The mechanisms of antibiotic sensitization are not clearly understood."

Overview of penicillin allergy.  
Chang C, Mahmood MM, Teuber SS, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jul 27;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Deodorants are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis to fragrance ingredients.
Fragrances frequently cause contact allergy, and cosmetic products are the main causes of fragrance contact allergy. Some product groups are potentially more likely to play a part in allergic reactions than others. This retrospective study based on data collected by members of the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group. Participants (N = 17,716) were consecutively patch tested with fragrance markers from the European baseline series (2005-2009). Of the participants, 10.1% had fragrance allergy, of which 42.1% was caused by a cosmetic product: deodorants accounted for 25%, and scented lotions 24.4%. A sex difference was apparent, as deodorants were significantly more likely to be listed as the cause of fragrance allergy in men than in women. Correlation was observed between deodorants listed as the cause of allergy and allergy detected with fragrance mix II (FM II) and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde.

Deodorants are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis to fragrance ingredients.  
Heisterberg MV, Menne T, Andersen KE, Avnstorp C, Kristensen B, Kristensen O, Kaaber K, Laurberg G, Henrik NN, Sommerlund M, Thormann J, Veien NK, Vissing S, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):258-264

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis among children
This study evaluated the proportion of positive reactions for allergens tested in children and to identify allergens with positive reactions in at least 1% of them. This was a systematic review of studies in PubMed (1966-2010) investigating allergens in at least 100 enrolled children. The top five allergens tested by at least two studies included nickel sulfate, ammonium persulfate, gold sodium thiosulfate, thimerosal, and toluene-2,5-diamine (p-toluenediamine). For most allergens, the proportion of positive reactions was higher in studies published after 1995 than in earlier studies.

Allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis among children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Bonitsis NG, Tatsioni A, Bassioukas K, Ioannidis JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):245-257

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Airway response to chlorine inhalation (bleach) among cleaning workers with and without bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
These results suggest that bleach inhalation at a concentration of 0.4 ppm-a concentration below 8-hr permissible occupational exposure level-brings about a substantial decrease in FEV1 in subjects with and without BHR. Some subjects have a positive challenge response to bleach inhalation.

Airway response to chlorine inhalation (bleach) among cleaning workers with and without bronchial hyperresponsiveness.  
Sastre J, Madero MF, Fernandez-Nieto M, Sastre B, del P, Potro MG, Quirce S.
Am J Ind Med 2011 Apr;54(4):293-299

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe bronchospasm using Diprivan in a patient allergic to peanut and birch.
Diprivan is composed of propofol, refined soybean oil and purified egg phosphatide. A child who underwent nevus surgery under general anesthesia was associated with an hypersensitivity reaction. The child was allergic to peanuts, raising the problem of cross allergy between birch, peanut, soy and Diprivan.

Propofol (INN, marketed as Diprivan by AstraZeneca) is a short-acting, intravenously administered hypnotic agent. Propofol (2-6 diisopropylphenol) is an alkyl phenol in a lipid vehicle (soybean oil, egg lecithin, glycerol) used in anesthesia.

Severe bronchospasm using Diprivan(R) in a patient allergic to peanut and birch. [French]  
Fontaine M, Dubost J, Bienvenu F, Ferrenq DR, Proton G, Piriou V.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Feb;30(2):147-149

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a major allergen in rambutan-induced anaphylaxis.
Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a major allergen in rambutan-induced anaphylaxis. Three adult patients, ages 35, 49, and 53 years, with a history of multiple episodes of anaphylactic reactions within 30 minutes after ingestion of half to 2 rambutans. All patients had cutaneous (eg, angioedema, flushing, and urticaria) and respiratory (eg, rhinitis, chest tightness, stridor, and wheezing) symptoms. One patient also had cardiovascular (eg, syncope) and gastrointestinal (eg, nausea and vomiting) symptoms. Patients 1 and 3 had a history of allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. No patient had a history of latex allergy. A positive prick-to-prick test result to fresh pulp rambutan was demonstrated in all patients, with mean wheal diameters of 16, 3, and 6 mm. Immunoblot analysis showed all 3 patients had serum IgE bound to approximately 40 kDa of protein, suggesting a major allergen and identified as Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

This is the first study to identify GAPDH as the allergen in rambutan. GAPDH of kiwifruit (Act d 3) and wheat was identified as a food allergen, whereas GAPDH of the indoor mold Aspergillus versicolor (Asp v 1-3) was a spore allergen. None of the 3 patients had symptoms to wheat or kiwifruit.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a major allergen in rambutan-induced anaphylaxis.  
Jirapongsananuruk O, Jirarattanasopa N, Pongpruksa S, Vichyanond P, Piboonpocanun S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jun;106(6):545-547

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to Mopane worms (Imbrasia belina).
Anaphylaxis. A 15-year-old Zimbabwean boy presented for evaluation a year after a severe reaction to eating 20 mopane worm (MWs). Ten minutes after ingestion, he experienced headache, dyspnea, cough, wheeze, palatal pruritus, urticaria, tongue, and lip swelling. Symptoms gradually resolved after antihistamine use, but drowsiness persisted for 48 hours. Since the age of 8 years, he had mouth and ear itching to MW ingestion. Dried MW was reconstituted and direct SPT resulted in a wheal of 7 mm and a flare of 15 mm. total

IgE level of 622 kU/L. Western blot with 3 worms (Ascaris, Anisakis, and Mopane) and the patient’s serum showed a clear band at 50 kD for mopane worm.

Anaphylaxis to Mopane worms (Imbrasia belina).  
Kung SJ, Fenemore B, Potter PC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jun;106(6):538-540

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational contact allergy in the building trade in Germany
Since 1993, efforts have been made in Germany to lower the incidence of allergic cement dermatitis by reducing the content of hexavalent chromium (Cr VI). Usage of epoxy resin systems has considerably increased in the building trade in the same period. The authors analysed data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) of 1,153 men working in the building trade (bricklayers, tile setters etc.) presenting with occupational skin disease in the years 1994-2008. While contact sensitization to chromate decreased from 43.1 to 29.0%, sensitization to epoxy resin increased from 8.4 to 12.4%. Patients having started to work in the building trade after 1999 had a significantly decreased risk of chromate sensitization and a significantly increased risk of sensitization to epoxy resin. Additionally, risk of thiuram sensitization increased with the duration of employment.

Occupational contact allergy in the building trade in Germany: influence of preventive measures and changing exposure.  
Geier J, Krautheim A, Uter W, Lessmann H, Schnuch A.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2011 Apr;84(4):403-411

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Plant lipid transfer protein allergens: no cross-reactivity between those from foods and olive and parietaria pollen.
Cross-reactivity among plant food allergens belonging to the nonspecific lipid transfer protein (LTP) family is well known. In contrast, the relationship among these allergens and their putative homologs from olive (Ole e 7) and Parietaria (Par j 1) pollen has not been clarified. Sera with specific IgE to LTP allergens were obtained from peach-, mustard- and olive pollen-allergic patients. Plant food LTP-allergic patients showed a significantly higher number of sera (89-100 vs. 33-64%) with specific IgE and mean specific IgE levels (0.30-1.56 vs. 0.21-0.34 OD units) to the 4 food LTP allergens tested (peach, apple, mustard and wheat) than to olive Ole e 7 and Parietaria Par j 1 pollen. ELISA-inhibition assays indicated cross-inhibition between food LTP allergens but no cross-reactivity between these allergens and Ole e 7 and Par j 1, or, even more, between the LTP allergens from olive and Parietaria pollen.

Conclusions: LTP allergens from olive and Parietaria pollen cross-react neither with allergenic LTPs from plant foods nor between themselves. Therefore, both pollens do not seem to be related with the LTP syndrome

Plant lipid transfer protein allergens: no cross-reactivity between those from foods and olive and parietaria pollen.  
Tordesillas L, Sirvent S, az-Perales A, Villalba M, Cuesta-Herranz J, Rodriguez R, Salcedo G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):291-296

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of IgE antibodies to recombinant peanut allergens in patients with reported reactions to peanut.
The objective was to evaluate IgE antibodies to various recombinant ® peanut and birch pollen allergens in relation to IgE levels to whole peanut extract and severe allergic reactions to peanut. 74 Swedish peanut-allergic patients (14-61 years) were assessed. Of 48 subjects sensitized to Ara h 1, 2 or 3, 60% had peanut-specific IgE levels >15 kU(A)/l, while 100% of the subjects without detectable IgE to these allergens had low peanut-specific IgE levels (<10 kU(A)/l). The levels of IgE to rAra h 8, rBet v 1 and birch pollen were highly correlated. Fifty-eight patients reported adverse reactions after accidental or deliberate peanut exposure (oral, inhalation or skin) of whom 41 had IgE to rAra h 1, 2 or 3. Symptoms of respiratory distress were associated with sensitization to Ara h 1, 2 or 3 (56 vs. 18%, p < 0.01). Two cases of anaphylaxis were reported among the individuals sensitized to Ara h 1-3. IgE to rAra h 8, rAra h 9, profilin or cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants were not associated with severe symptoms. In Swedish patients, IgE reactivity to Ara h 1, 2 and 3 is associated with severe reactions after exposure to peanut.

Evaluation of IgE antibodies to recombinant peanut allergens in patients with reported reactions to peanut.  
Moverare R, Ahlstedt S, Bengtsson U, Borres MP, van HM, Poorafshar M, Sjolander S, Akerstrom J, van OJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):282-290

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Influence of processing on the allergenic properties of pistachio nut.
This study was undertaken to investigate the distinctions between different cultivars of pistachio nut and the influence of different processing on the IgE-binding capacity of whole pistachio protein extracts. The Western blotting results of extracts from pistachio cultivars showed no marked difference among them. The IgE-binding capacity was significantly lower for the protein extract prepared from steam-roasted than from raw and dry-roasted pistachio nuts. The results of sensory evaluation analysis and hedonic rating proved no significant differences in color, taste, flavor, and overall quality of raw, roasted, and steam-roasted pistachio nut treatments.

Influence of processing on the allergenic properties of pistachio nut assessed in vitro.  
Noorbakhsh R, Mortazavi SA, Sankian M, Shahidi F, Maleki SJ, Nasiraii LR, Falak R, Sima HR, Varasteh A.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Sep 22;58(18):10231-10235

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Biofortification of soybean meal: immunological properties of the 27 kDa gamma-zein.
Legumes, including soybeans ( Glycine max ), are deficient in sulfur-containing amino acids, which are required for the optimal growth of monogastric animals. This deficiency can be overcome by expressing heterologous proteins rich in sulfur-containing amino acids in soybean seeds. A maize 27 kDa gamma-zein, a cysteine-rich protein, has been successfully expressed in several crops including soybean, barley, and alfalfa with the intent to biofortify these crops for animal feed. Previous work has shown that the maize 27 kDa zein can withstand digestion by pepsin and elicit an immunogenic response in young pigs. By use of sera from patients who tested positive by ImmunoCAP assay for elevated IgE to maize proteins, specific IgE binding to the 27 kDa gamma-zein is demonstrated. Significant sequence homology of the 27 kDa gamma-zein with several known allergens was shown. Immunoblot analysis using human serum that cross-reacts with maize seed proteins also revealed specific IgE-binding to the 27 kDa gamma-zein in soybean seed protein extracts containing the 27 kDa zein. This study demonstrates for the first time the allergenicity potential of the 27 kDa gamma-zein and the potential that this protein has to limit livestock performance when used in soybeans that serve as a biofortified feed supplement

Biofortification of soybean meal: immunological properties of the 27 kDa gamma-zein.  
Krishnan HB, Jang S, Kim WS, Kerley MS, Oliver MJ, Trick HN.
J Agric Food Chem 2011 Feb 23;59(4):1223-1228

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
High molecular weight entities in industrial wheat protein hydrolysates are immunoreactive with IgE from allergic patients.
Hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWP) can induce immediate hypersensitivity through skin contact and/or food ingestion. Such patients develop IgE against unmodified wheat proteins without allergy to wheat. This study evaluated the IgE-reacting content of HWP and compared the reactivity of HWP and unmodified wheat proteins with IgE from patients suffering from immediate hypersensitivity to HWP. The tested HWP carried mainly unmodified epitopes originating from wheat proteins. The size distribution of polypeptides from two HWP preparations was analyzed by size-exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC), and their reactivity with IgE was studied. This showed that they contained highly IgE-reacting high molecular weight entities, likely resulting in a rearrangement of peptides issued from gluten processes. These multiepitopic entities could explain the high immunogenicity of HWP for sensitized people.

High molecular weight entities in industrial wheat protein hydrolysates are immunoreactive with IgE from allergic patients.  
Bouchez-Mahiout I, Pecquet C, Kerre S, Snegaroff J, Raison-Peyron N, Lauriere M.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Apr 14;58(7):4207-4215

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New-onset asthma and the effect of environment and occupation among farming and nonfarming rural subjects.
Exposure to swine and dairy confinements, welding, smoking, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness are risk factors for nonallergic asthma, and being born and raised on a farm reduces the subsequent risk. These findings support the theory that immune and inflammatory responses can be influenced by environmental exposure to early childhood, reducing the risk of asthma later in life.

New-onset asthma and the effect of environment and occupation among farming and nonfarming rural subjects.  
Omland O, Hjort C, Pedersen OF, Miller MR, Sigsgaard T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 11;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mango contact allergy.
A 25-year-old male developed acute swelling of both lips and a “cold sore” on the inner aspect of the lower lip and some mild patchy erythema to his face and ears. He reported no fever or pain, but did notice some tingling of the lips and general malaise. He had previously experienced two episodes of poison oak dermatitis. The patient was noted to have developed cheilitis and angioedema of the face. The lips were edematous, eroded, and diffusely

erythematous, predominantly on the left. An erythematous, nonblanching, pruritic rash with subcutaneous edema also had spread over his left face, extending up from his lips over his cheeks and nose and up to his orbits and forehead. Periorbital edema with ptosis was also apparent on the left side. He had no tongue swelling and no difficulty with speech, breathing, or swallowing. He had used his teeth to peel a mango for each of the previous 2 days. Mango contact allergy is more common in those with a history of poison ivy and poison oak dermatitis, as these plants are closely related and mango sap contains the same uroshiol allergen.

Mango contact allergy.  
Trehan I, Meuli GJ.
J Travel Med 2010 Jul-Aug;17(4):284.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pruritic dermatitis on an oil tanker after a visit to French Guyana.
A 40-year-old seaman presented with a severe pruritic skin reaction on his limbs and neck after visiting French Guyana on an oil tanker. Twenty crewmembers had had the same complaints. The harbor in French Guyana had been devastated by an invasion of Hylesia metabus (Yellowtail moth / Ashen moth), a moth that can cause a serious dermatitis due to contact with the hairs (setae) of the female moth. Complaints due to contact with caterpillars, butterflies, or moths is called lepidopterism. The complaints are self-limiting, and treatment is symptomatic.

Pruritic dermatitis on an oil tanker after a visit to French Guyana.  
Hassing RJ, Bauer AG.
J Travel Med 2008 Nov-Dec;15(6):464-5.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms.
Lactose is widely used in pharmaceutical formulations as a diluent or carrier. This includes prescription medicines, over-the-counter and complementary medicines. In adults with lactose intolerance, ingestion of lactose may cause gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The symptoms vary according to the quantity of lactose ingested, the patients ability to digest lactose and the amount and type of colonic flora.

The dose of lactose in most pharmaceuticals is usually less than 2g per day. Therefore, unless an adult has severe lactose intolerance, it is unlikely that lactose in a conventional oral solid-dosage form will cause severe GI symptoms.

On the basis of the findings of one randomised double-blind controlled study the authors suggest that lactase deficiency should not be considered a contraindication to the use of medicines containing 400mg lactose or less.

One UK study has shown that lactose is present in medicines used for a wide range of GI symptoms, which could result in symptoms of lactose intolerance in susceptible individuals. As patients often take more than one medication, cumulative exposure to lactose may occur. The authors suggest that the lactose content of medicines should be considered in addition to dietary sources in the management of patients with lactose intolerance.

Although published case reports are rare, lactose-containing medications may cause patient discomfort and subsequently affect patient concordance. Different routes of administration, a different brand of the same medicine or a completely different medicine may be necessary. Liquid preparations of most medicines are lactose-free and may provide an alternative option in some cases.

For patients with severe lactose intolerance, the lactose content of any medications should be determined prior to prescribing by consulting the relevant manufacturer of the product. The amount of lactose used may vary by manufacturer, product, formulation and strength. [Wessex Drug and Medicines Information Centre 04/07/2011]

Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms.  
Montalto M, Gallo A, Santoro L, D'Onofrio F, Curigliano V, Covino M, Cammarota G, Grieco A, Gasbarrini A, Gasbarrini G.
Miscellaneous Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2008 Oct 15;28(8):1003-12.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of methionine synthase (Sal k 3), as a novel allergen of Salsola kali pollen.
Salsola kali pollen is a common cause of pollinosis during summer and early fall in desert and semi-desert regions. The aim of this study was the identification and characterization of Sal k 3, a new allergen from S. kali pollen. IgE-binding capacity of rSal k 3 fragments was studied by IgE-immunoblotting, inhibition assays, and skin prick tests. A 45-kDa allergen was identified as a fragment of the cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) and was detected in the sera of 8/12 (66.6%) of S. kali allergic patients.

Identification of methionine synthase (Sal k 3), as a novel allergen of Salsola kali pollen.  
Assarehzadegan MA, sankian M, Jabbari F, Tehrani M, Falak R, Varasteh A.
Mol Biol Rep 2011 Jan;38(1):65-73

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta (Razor clam).
IgE reactivity of recombinant tropomyosin was investigated by immunoblot and the sensized precentage was 36% which indicated that tropomyosin was the minor allergens in S. constricta (Razor clam)

Sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA clone encoding tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta.  
Song J, Li L, Liu Z, Li Q, Ran P.
Mol Biol Rep 2009 Feb;36(2):315-321

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens in Brassica nigra (black mustard)
Brassica nigra is a newly found invasive species in Zhejiang Province, China. It distributes alongside the roads, in vegetable fields and on riversides. When it blooms, some natives there will suffer from allergic rhinitis. Profilin was isolated from flower bud cDNA of B. nigra. The gene, BnPFN, express only in anthers and pollens, and there was no detection in roots, leaves, stems, sepals, petals and pistils. It is suggested that BnPFN is a pollen-specific gene and may be responsible for pollen anaphylactic reactions in those invading areas when B. nigra blooms.

Molecular cloning and characterization of a profilin gene BnPFN from Brassica nigra that expressing in a pollen-specific manner.  
Liu Q, Guo Z.
Mol Biol Rep 2009 Jan;36(1):135-139

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mango profilin: cloning, expression and cross-reactivity with birch pollen profilin Bet v 2.
Profilin has been assumed partly responsible for the cross-reactivity between mango fruit and other allergens but has not been finally clarified. In this study, two isoforms of mango fruits profilin characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein show high identity with other allergenic profilins (73-90%). Eight of 18 (44%) mango-allergic patients tested presented specific IgE-antibodies to recombinant mango profilin. High cross-reactivity was found between mango profilin with profilins from birch pollen. Man I 3.02 was the isoform closer to profilins of other fruits such as pear (80%), peach (90%) and apple (80%). Inhibition experiments revealed high cross-reactivity of the mango profilin with the profilin from birch pollen rBet v 2 (78%) and mango extracts (85%) suggesting that mango profilin shares epitope with profilin from different botanical origins.

Mango profilin: cloning, expression and cross-reactivity with birch pollen profilin Bet v 2.  
Song J, Zhang H, Liu Z, Ran P.
Mol Biol Rep 2008 Jun;35(2):231-237

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food processing increases casein resistance to simulated infant digestion.
Milk processing led to differences in peptide patterns and heat treatment of milk tended to increase the number of peptides found in digested samples. This highlights the likely impact of milk processing on the allergenic potential of CNs

Food processing increases casein resistance to simulated infant digestion.  
Dupont D, Mandalari G, Molle D, Jardin J, Rolet-Repecaud O, Duboz G, Leonil J, Mills CE, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Nov;54(11):1677-1689

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on lentil allergenicity.
Lentil protein extract was hydrolyzed by sequential action of an endoprotease (Alcalase) and an exoprotease (Flavourzyme). Immunoreactivity to raw and hydrolyzed lentil extract was evaluated by means of IgE immunoblotting and ELISA using sera from five patients with clinical allergy to lentil. The results indicated that sequential hydrolysis of lentil results in an important proteolytic destruction of IgE-binding epitopes shown by in vitro experiments. However, some allergenic proteins were still detected by sera from four out of five patients in the last step of sequential hydrolyzation.

Effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on lentil allergenicity.  
Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Rodriguez J, Gonzalez A, Muzquiz M, Cuadrado C, Crespo JF, Burbano C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Sep;54(9):1266-1272

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of Lep w 1, the major allergen of whiff.
Whiff is a fish frequently consumed in Spain. The resistance of Lep w 1 to heat denaturation and to digestion were studied. Purified Lep w 1 was thermally stable up to 65 degrees C at neutral pH. A partial loss of structure was also observed at acidic pH; however, the allergen retained its full IgE-binding ability. The partially denatured Lep w 1 was easily digested by pepsin within 2 min. Cooked extract revealed a higher number of IgE reactive bands than an extract from uncooked fish. IgE binding to these proteins could not be inhibited by an extract from uncooked fish. In contrast to a raw fish extract, the cooked extract showed higher resistance to pepsinolysis. The stability of Lep w 1 to thermal denaturation and digestion explains the high allergenicity of whiff.

Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of Lep w 1, the major allergen of whiff.  
Griesmeier U, Bublin M, Radauer C, Vazquez-Cortes S, Ma Y, Fernandez-Rivas M, Breiteneder H.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jun;54(6):861-869

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular Allergy in Practice: exploration of a patient with exercise anaphylaxis
A 43-year-old woman experienced anaphylaxis after a short run preceded by a meal in a pancake restaurant. Skin prick tests were positive for wheat and buckwheat, serum specific IgE determination confirmed sensitization to wheat, buckwheat and ?5-gliadin. Wheat dependant exercise induced anaphylaxis diagnosis was made. Most often ?5-gliadin is involved and is known to be associated with potential severe reactions. Molecular diagnosis may allow the clinician to avoid a challenge test that might be at risk for the patient.

Allergologie moléculaire en pratique : exploration d’une patiente présentant une anaphylaxie d’effort / Molecular Allergy in Practice: exploration of a patient with exercise anaphylaxis  
C. Mailhol, A. Didier
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):454-455

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis: a New Zealand experience.
Children with atopic dermatitis often have infective exacerbations which are treated with antibiotics and/or antiseptics. The most common infective cause is Staphylococcus aureus with a worldwide trend towards antibiotic resistance. This prospective observational audit aimed primarily to establish the prevalence of S. aureus colonisation in New Zealand children with atopic dermatitis attending a specialised paediatric dermatology clinic.

Three quarters of children with atopic dermatitis had at least one positive culture, of which the vast majority was S. aureus. The density of S. aureus colonisation correlated to severity of atopic dermatitis. Children who were S. aureus culture-positive had no significant demographic or clinical features different to children who were culture-negative. Only two children grew S. aureus resistant to flucloxacillin (2% resistance rate).

Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis: a New Zealand experience.  
Hill SE, Yung A, Rademaker M.
Australas J Dermatol 2011 Feb;52(1):27-31

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Glutaraldehyde-modified recombinant Fel d 1
This study evaluated whether glutaraldehyde modification is a good strategy to produce hypoallergenic recombinant allergens with retained immunogenicity and concludes that chemical modification is a practical and highly effective approach for achieving hypoallergenicity of recombinant allergens with retained immunogenicity.

Glutaraldehyde-modified recombinant Fel d 1: a hypoallergen with negligible biological activity but retained immunogenicity  
Versteeg, Serge A.; Bulder, Ingrid; Himly, Martin; van Capel, Toni M.; van den Hout, R.; Koppelman, Stef J.; de Jong, Esther C.; Ferreira, Fatima; van Ree, Ronald
WAO Journal 2011;4(7):113-120

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Climate change, migration, and allergic respiratory diseases: an update for the allergist
Local climate changes can impact on a number of factors, including air pollution, that have been shown to influence both the development and attacks of allergic respiratory diseases, and they thus represent an important consideration for the allergist. Migration involves exposure to a new set of pollutants and allergens and changes in housing conditions, diet and accessibility to medical services, all of which are likely to affect migrants' health. This review provides an update on climate change, migration, and allergy and discusses factors for consideration when making recommendations for local allergy service provision, and for assessing an individual patient's environmental exposures.

Climate change, migration, and allergic respiratory diseases: an update for the allergist  
D'Amato, Gennaro; Rottem, Menachem; Dahl, Ronald; Blaiss, Michael S.; Ridolo, Erminia; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Rosario, Nelson; Motala, Cassim; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella
WAO Journal 2011;4(7):121-125

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Feather bedding and childhood asthma associated with house dust mite sensitisation: a randomised controlled trial.  
Glasgow NJ, Ponsonby AL, Kemp A, Tovey E, van AP, McKay K, Forbes S.
Arch Dis Child 2011 Jun;96(6):541-547

Two cases of royal jelly allergy provoked the symptoms at the time of their first intake. [Japanese]  
Harada S, Moriyama T, Tanaka A.
Arerugi 2011 Jun;60(6):708-713

Analysis of 76 patients with urticaria and angioedema induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Japan. [Japanese]  
Moriya M, Aihara M, Hirota R, Hirata Y, Ikinaga N, Takamura N, Kunimi Y, Uchida T, Ikezawa Z.
Arerugi 2011 Jun;60(6):699-707

Allergies in the workplace: Contact dermatitis in the plastic industry – a case series.  
H Mwanga
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2011;24(1):44 - 46
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Climate change and aeroallergens in South Africa  
D Berman
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2011;24(2):65-73
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Inaugural lecture: From farm to fork – a fishy story of allergy and asthma  
MF Jeebhay
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2011;24(2):97-103
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Food challenges: ABC of allergy  
CL Gray, S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2011;24(2):104-110
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Diagnosis of drug-induced skin reactions: a future role for computer-aided systems?  
Burbach GJ, Zuberbier T.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 22;

The IgE-microarray testing in atopic dermatitis: a suitable modern tool for the immunological and clinical phenotyping of the disease.  
Mari A, Scala E, Alessandri C.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 18;

Botanical briefs: kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis).  
Lee YH, Elston DM.
Cutis 2011 May;87(5):217-220

Successful photopatch testing with ketoprofen using one-hour occlusion.  
Marmgren V, Hindsen M, Zimerson E, Bruze M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2011 Mar;91(2):131-136

Omega-5 gliadin anaphylaxis: an integrated diagnostic approach.  
Yacoub MR, Savi E, Burastero SE, Dal FS, Mason C, Pecora S, Colombo G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):92-94

When allergology meets psychiatry: delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome).  
Lombardi C, Belli D, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):89-91

Analysis of hypersensitivity to oleaceae pollen in an olive-free and ash-free area by commercial pollen extracts and recombinant allergens.  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):77-80

Has allergenic pollen an impact on non-allergic diseases?  
Besancenot JP, Thibaudon M, Cecchi L.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):69-76

Is the strange case of mugwort sensitivity in ragweed-allergic subjects coming eventually to a solution?  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jun;43(3):67-68

Seasonal population of Acarus siro mites and effects of their faeces on allergenic immunological disorder modulated by garlic in albino rat.  
bdel-Salam BK.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jul 11;

Open oral food challenge in the confirmation of cow's milk allergy mediated by immunoglobulin E.  
Bicudo MR, Motta FJ, Rodrigues CR, Suano de Souza FI, Lopes de Oliveira LC, Saccardo Sarni RO, Sole D.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jul 11;

Anaphylaxis to Malaysian meat loaf.  
Moritz KB, Kopp T, Stingl G, Bublin M, Breiteneder H, Wohrl S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jul;39(4):244-245

Delay of onset of symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis by treatment with a leukotriene receptor antagonist.  
Gotoh M, Suzuki H, Okubo K.
Allergol Int 2011 Jul 25;

Macadamia nut allergy: potentially misleading specific IgE results.  
Ekbote A, Hayman G, Bansal A.
Allergy 2010 Mar 19;

Toward a standardized reading of the atopy patch test in children with suspected cow's milk allergy-related gastrointestinal symptoms.  
Berni CR, Buongiovanni A, Nocerino R, Cosenza L, Troncone R.
Allergy 2011 Jul 14;

The basophil activation test is a helpful diagnostic tool in anaphylaxis to sesame with false-negative specific IgE and negative skin test.  
Raap U, Wieczorek D, Schenck F, Kapp A, Wedi B.
Allergy 2011 Jul 14;

The high prevalence of peanut sensitization in childhood is due to cross-reactivity to pollen.  
Niggemann B, Schmitz R, Schlaud M.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):980-1.
Abstract

Chronic palpable purpura mediated by Kiwi antigen Act c 1-induced immune complex vasculitis.  
Gutermuth J, Kristof S, Ollert M, Mempel M, Ring J.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):982-3.
Abstract

Cow's milk allergy as a cause of anaphylaxis to systemic corticosteroids.  
Savvatianos S, Giavi S, Stefanaki E, Siragakis G, Manousakis E, Papadopoulos NG.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):983-5.
Abstract

Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - classification, diagnosis and management: review of the EAACI/ENDA(#) and GA2LEN/HANNA*.  
Kowalski ML, Makowska JS, Blanca M, Bavbek S, Bochenek G, Bousquet J, Bousquet P, Celik G, Demoly P, Gomes ER, Nizankowska-Mogilnicka E, Romano A, Sanchez-Borges M, Sanz M, Torres MJ, De WA, .
Allergy 2011 Jul;66(7):818-829

Anaphylaxis caused by Hymenoptera stings: from epidemiology to treatment.  
Bilo MB.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66 Suppl 9535-37

Allergen structures and epitopes.  
Meno KH.
Allergy 2011 Jul;66 Suppl 9519-21

Outcomes and safety of drug provocation tests.  
Aun MV, Bisaccioni C, Garro LS, Rodrigues AT, Tanno LK, Ensina LF, Kalil J, Motta AA, Giavina-Bianchi P.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2011 Jul;32(4):301-306

The role of genetics and environment in the rise of childhood food allergy.  
Tan TH, Ellis JA, Saffery R, Allen KJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 19;

Ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulins A and G levels at age 2 years are associated with the occurrence of atopic disorders.  
Kukkonen AK, Savilahti EM, Haahtela T, Savilahti E, Kuitunen M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 19;

Immunoglobulin-E-binding epitopes of wheat allergens in patients with food allergy to wheat and in mice experimentally sensitized to wheat proteins.  
Denery-Papini S, Bodinier M, Pineau F, Triballeau S, Tranquet O, Adel-Patient K, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Bakan B, Marion D, Mothes T, Mameri H, Kasarda D.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 19;

Lifetime dog and cat exposure and dog- and cat-specific sensitization at age 18 years.  
Wegienka G, Johnson CC, Havstad S, Ownby DR, Nicholas C, Zoratti EM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):979-986

Cat allergen-induced blood basophil reactivity in vitro predicts acute human nasal allergen challenge responses in vivo.  
Paterniti M, Kelly DC, Eckman JA, Sterba PM, Hamilton RG, Bochner BS, Macglashan DW, Saini SS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):963-969

The long-term protective effects of domestic animals in the home.  
Erwin EA, Woodfolk JA, Ronmark E, Perzanowski M, Platts-Mills TA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):920-922

Peanuts for preschoolers: less preposterous than previously perceived?  
Kim JS, Jarvinen KM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):914-916

A new approach to the isolation and characterization of wheat flour allergens.  
Sotkovsky P, Sklenar J, Halada P, Cinova J, Setinova I, Kainarova A, Golias J, Pavlaskova K, Honzova S, Tuckova L.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul;41(7):1031-1043

Can component-based microarray replace fluorescent enzimoimmunoassay in the diagnosis of grass and cypress pollen allergy?  
Cabrera-Freitag P, Goikoetxea MJ, Beorlegui C, Gamboa P, Gastaminza G, Fernandez-Benitez M, Ferrer M, Blanca M, Sanz ML.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 13;

Drug-specific cyclodextrins with emphasis on sugammadex, the neuromuscular blocker rocuronium and perioperative anaphylaxis: implications for drug allergy.  
Baldo BA, McDonnell NJ, Pham NH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jul 7;

Overview of penicillin allergy.  
Chang C, Mahmood MM, Teuber SS, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jul 27;

Contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone in a deodorant.  
Amaro C, Santos R, Cardoso J.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):298-299

Occupational contact urticaria caused by didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride.  
Ruiz OA, Fischer FU, Duus JJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):297-298

Cutaneous adverse drug reactions caused by delayed sensitization to carboxymethylcellulose.  
Barbaud A, Waton J, Pinault AL, Bursztejn AC, Schmutz JL, Trechot P.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):294-297

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by dihydroxyacetone - optimal concentration and vehicle for patch testing.  
Zokaie S, Singh S, Wakelin SH.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):291-292

Nickel allergy in Spain needs active intervention.  
Garcia-Gavin J, rmario-Hita JC, Fernandez-Redondo V, Fernandez-Vozmediano JM, Sanchez-Perez J, Silvestre JF, Uter W, Gimenez-Arnau AM.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):289-291

Metal sensitivity in patients with orthopaedic implants: a prospective study.  
Frigerio E, Pigatto PD, Guzzi G, Altomare G.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):273-279

Deodorants are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis to fragrance ingredients.  
Heisterberg MV, Menne T, Andersen KE, Avnstorp C, Kristensen B, Kristensen O, Kaaber K, Laurberg G, Henrik NN, Sommerlund M, Thormann J, Veien NK, Vissing S, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):258-264

Allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis among children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Bonitsis NG, Tatsioni A, Bassioukas K, Ioannidis JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):245-257

Allergic contact cheilitis caused by ditrimethylolpropane triethylhexanoate in a lipstick.  
Miura M, Isami M, Yagami A, Matsunaga K.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):301-302

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by azithromycin in an eye drop.  
Flavia Monteagudo PA, Francisco Silvestre SJ, Latorre MN, Cuesta ML, Toledo AF.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):300-301

A case of IgE-mediated allergy and cell-mediated allergy to Seaprose-S in the same patient.  
De PT, Buonomo A, Pecora V, Colagiovanni A, Aruanno A, Sabato V, Pascolini L, Rizzi A, Nucera E, Schiavino D.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 May;64(5):299-300

Airway response to chlorine inhalation (bleach) among cleaning workers with and without bronchial hyperresponsiveness.  
Sastre J, Madero MF, Fernandez-Nieto M, Sastre B, del P, Potro MG, Quirce S.
Am J Ind Med 2011 Apr;54(4):293-299

Control of the biological diagnostic assessment. Immunoglobulin E. [French]  
Guilloux L, Benoit Y, imone-Gastin I, Ponvert C, Beaudouin E.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Mar;30(3):294-304

Prevention of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anaesthesia. Choice of agents and anaesthetic techniques. [French]  
Malinovsky JM, Lavaud F, Demoly P, Mertes PM, Plaud B.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Mar;30(3):305-311

Treatment of hypersensitivity reactions and anaphylactic shock occurring during anaesthesia. [French]  
Longrois D, Lejus C, Constant I, Bruyere M, Mertes PM.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Mar;30(3):312-322

What is the reality of anaphylactoid reactions during anaesthesia? Classification, prevalence, clinical features, drugs involved and morbidity and mortality. [French]  
Mertes PM, Karila C, Demoly P, Auroy Y, Ponvert C, Lucas MM, Malinovsky JM.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Mar;30(3):223-239

Skin tests to diagnose hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anaesthesia. [French]  
Lavaud F, Mouton C, Ponvert C.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Mar;30(3):264-279

Severe bronchospasm using Diprivan(R) in a patient allergic to peanut and birch. [French]  
Fontaine M, Dubost J, Bienvenu F, Ferrenq DR, Proton G, Piriou V.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2011 Feb;30(2):147-149

Immediate allergic reactions to beta-lactams: Diagnostic accuracy of skin tests.  
Moreno E, Davila I, Laffond E, Gracia T, Munoz F, Lorente F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jul;107(1):89-90

Bruton syndrome and celiac disease.  
Bonamico M, Magliocca FM, Mennini M, Nenna R, Caggiano S, Ragusa G, Montuori M, Duse M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jul;107(1):86-87

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a major allergen in rambutan-induced anaphylaxis.  
Jirapongsananuruk O, Jirarattanasopa N, Pongpruksa S, Vichyanond P, Piboonpocanun S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jun;106(6):545-547

Anaphylaxis to Mopane worms (Imbrasia belina).  
Kung SJ, Fenemore B, Potter PC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jun;106(6):538-540

Comparison of conventional and component-resolved diagnostics by two different methods (Advia-Centaur/Microarray-ISAC) in pollen allergy.  
Lizaso MT, Garcia BE, Tabar AI, Lasa E, Echechipia S, Alvarez MJ, Anda M, Gomez B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jul;107(1):35-41

Occupational contact allergy in the building trade in Germany: influence of preventive measures and changing exposure.  
Geier J, Krautheim A, Uter W, Lessmann H, Schnuch A.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2011 Apr;84(4):403-411

Patients' satisfaction with diagnostic drug provocation tests and perception of its usefulness.  
Gomes ER, Kvedariene V, Demoly P, Bousquet PJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):333-338

Faecal microbiota and short-chain fatty acid levels in faeces from infants with cow's milk protein allergy.  
Thompson-Chagoyan OC, Fallani M, Maldonado J, Vieites JM, Khanna S, Edwards C, Dore J, Gil A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):325-332

Plant lipid transfer protein allergens: no cross-reactivity between those from foods and olive and parietaria pollen.  
Tordesillas L, Sirvent S, az-Perales A, Villalba M, Cuesta-Herranz J, Rodriguez R, Salcedo G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):291-296

Evaluation of IgE antibodies to recombinant peanut allergens in patients with reported reactions to peanut.  
Moverare R, Ahlstedt S, Bengtsson U, Borres MP, van HM, Poorafshar M, Sjolander S, Akerstrom J, van OJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):282-290

Cloning, expression and patient IgE reactivity of recombinant Pru du 6, an 11s globulin from almond.  
Willison LN, Tripathi P, Sharma G, Teuber SS, Sathe SK, Roux KH.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):267-281

Expression of a major plant allergen as membrane-anchored and secreted protein in human cells with preserved T cell and B cell epitopes.  
Baranyi U, Gattringer M, Boehm A, Marth K, Focke-Tejkl M, Bohle B, Blatt K, Valent P, Valenta R, Wekerle T.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):259-266

Latex Medical Gloves: Time for a Reappraisal.  
Palosuo T, Antoniadou I, Gottrup F, Phillips P.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):234-246

Component-resolved diagnostics: shedding light on the so-called 'squishy science' of food allergies?  
Kim JS, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Jun 29;156(3):231-233

Aggravation of atopic dermatitis in breast-fed infants by tree nut-related foods and fermented foods in breast milk.  
Uenishi T, Sugiura H, Tanaka T, Uehara M.
J Dermatol 2011 Feb;38(2):140-5.
Abstract

Quantitative determination of allergenic 5-alk(en)ylresorcinols in mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel, pulp, and fruit products by high-performance liquid chromatography.  
Knodler M, Reisenhauer K, Schieber A, Carle R.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 May 13;57(9):3639-3644

Specific detection of banana residue in processed foods using polymerase chain reaction.  
Sakai Y, Ishihata K, Nakano S, Yamada T, Yano T, Uchida K, Nakao Y, Urisu A, Adachi R, Teshima R, Akiyama H.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jul 28;58(14):8145-8151

Effects of various saccharides on the masking of epitope sites and uptake in the gut of cedar allergen Cry j 1-saccharide conjugates by a naturally occurring Maillard reaction.  
Aoki R, Saito A, Azakami H, Kato A.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jul 14;58(13):7986-7990

Maize 27 kda gamma-zein is a potential allergen for early weaned pigs.  
Krishnan HB, Kerley MS, Allee GL, Jang S, Kim WS, Fu CJ.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jun 23;58(12):7323-7328

Effects of thermal processing on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detection of milk residues in a model food matrix.  
Downs ML, Taylor SL.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Sep 22;58(18):10085-10091

Influence of processing on the allergenic properties of pistachio nut assessed in vitro.  
Noorbakhsh R, Mortazavi SA, Sankian M, Shahidi F, Maleki SJ, Nasiraii LR, Falak R, Sima HR, Varasteh A.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Sep 22;58(18):10231-10235

Inbred Chinese Wuzhishan (WZS) minipig model for soybean glycinin and beta-conglycinin allergy.  
Huang Q, Xu H, Yu Z, Gao P, Liu S.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Apr 28;58(8):5194-5198

Cloning and characterization of 11s legumin, Car I 4, a major allergen in pecan.  
Sharma GM, Irsigler A, Dhanaraj P, Ayuso R, Bardina L, Sampson HA, Roux KH, Sathe SK.
J Agric Food Chem 2011 Jun 30. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Biofortification of soybean meal: immunological properties of the 27 kDa gamma-zein.  
Krishnan HB, Jang S, Kim WS, Kerley MS, Oliver MJ, Trick HN.
J Agric Food Chem 2011 Feb 23;59(4):1223-1228

Release of soluble protein from peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) and its adsorption by activated charcoal.  
Kopper R, Van T, Kim A, Helm R.
J Agric Food Chem 2011 Jan 12;59(1):236-240

High molecular weight entities in industrial wheat protein hydrolysates are immunoreactive with IgE from allergic patients.  
Bouchez-Mahiout I, Pecquet C, Kerre S, Snegaroff J, Raison-Peyron N, Lauriere M.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Apr 14;58(7):4207-4215

Determination of the bovine food allergen casein in white wines by quantitative indirect ELISA, SDS-PAGE, Western blot and immunostaining.  
Patrick W, Hans S, Angelika P.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Sep 23;57(18):8399-8405

Solubilization and electrophoretic characterization of select edible nut seed proteins.  
Sathe SK, Venkatachalam M, Sharma GM, Kshirsagar HH, Teuber SS, Roux KH.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Sep 9;57(17):7846-7856

Effects of heating and glycation of beta-lactoglobulin on its recognition by IgE of sera from cow milk allergy patients.  
Taheri-Kafrani A, Gaudin JC, Rabesona H, Nioi C, Agarwal D, Drouet M, Chobert JM, Bordbar AK, Haertle T.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Jun 10;57(11):4974-4982

26-Week oral safety study in macaques for transgenic rice containing major human T-cell epitope peptides from Japanese cedar pollen allergens.  
Domon E, Takagi H, Hirose S, Sugita K, Kasahara S, Ebinuma H, Takaiwa F.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 Jun 24;57(12):5633-5638

New-onset asthma and the effect of environment and occupation among farming and nonfarming rural subjects.  
Omland O, Hjort C, Pedersen OF, Miller MR, Sigsgaard T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 11;

Anaphylaxis to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines among children with cow's milk allergy.  
Kattan JD, Konstantinou GN, Cox AL, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Gimenez G, Sampson HA, Sicherer SH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul;128(1):215-218

Nasal allergen provocation test with multiple aeroallergens detects polysensitization in local allergic rhinitis.  
Rondon C, Campo P, Herrera R, Blanca-Lopez N, Melendez L, Canto G, Torres MJ, Blanca M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 22;

Delayed hypersensitivity reactions caused by iodixanol: An assessment of cross-reactivity in 22 patients.  
Hasdenteufel F, Waton J, Cordebar V, Studer M, Collignon O, Luyasu S, Beaudouin E, Renaudin JM, Morisset M, Kanny G, Barbaud A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jul 20;

Mapping of conformational IgE epitopes with peptide-specific monoclonal antibodies reveals simultaneous binding of different IgE antibodies to a surface patch on the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1.  
Gieras A, Cejka P, Blatt K, Focke-Tejkl M, Linhart B, Flicker S, Stoecklinger A, Marth K, Drescher A, Thalhamer J, Valent P, Majdic O, Valenta R.
J Immunol 2011 May 1;186(9):5333-5344

Contact dermatitis after temporary tattoo at Sharm El Sheik.  
Arranz J, Llabrés C, Bennàssar MA.
J Travel Med 2011 Jan-Feb;18(1):67-8.

Anaphylaxis in an airplane after insecticide spraying.  
Vanden Driessche KS, Sow A, Van Gompel A, Vandeurzen K.
J Travel Med 2010 Nov-Dec;17(6):427-9.

Mango contact allergy.  
Trehan I, Meuli GJ.
J Travel Med 2010 Jul-Aug;17(4):284.

Recognition, management, and prevention of hymenopteran stings and allergic reactions in travelers.  
Diaz JH.
J Travel Med 2009 Sep-Oct;16(5):357-64.

Pruritic dermatitis on an oil tanker after a visit to French Guyana.  
Hassing RJ, Bauer AG.
J Travel Med 2008 Nov-Dec;15(6):464-5.

Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms.  
Montalto M, Gallo A, Santoro L, D'Onofrio F, Curigliano V, Covino M, Cammarota G, Grieco A, Gasbarrini A, Gasbarrini G.
Miscellaneous Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2008 Oct 15;28(8):1003-12.
Abstract

Identification of methionine synthase (Sal k 3), as a novel allergen of Salsola kali pollen.  
Assarehzadegan MA, sankian M, Jabbari F, Tehrani M, Falak R, Varasteh A.
Mol Biol Rep 2011 Jan;38(1):65-73

Sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA clone encoding tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta.  
Song J, Li L, Liu Z, Li Q, Ran P.
Mol Biol Rep 2009 Feb;36(2):315-321

Molecular cloning and characterization of a profilin gene BnPFN from Brassica nigra that expressing in a pollen-specific manner.  
Liu Q, Guo Z.
Mol Biol Rep 2009 Jan;36(1):135-139

Mango profilin: cloning, expression and cross-reactivity with birch pollen profilin Bet v 2.  
Song J, Zhang H, Liu Z, Ran P.
Mol Biol Rep 2008 Jun;35(2):231-237

High pressure, thermal and pulsed electric-field-induced structural changes in selected food allergens.  
Johnson PE, Van dP, Balasa A, Husband FA, Grauwet T, Hendrickx M, Knorr D, Mills EN, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Dec;54(12):1701-1710

Food processing increases casein resistance to simulated infant digestion.  
Dupont D, Mandalari G, Molle D, Jardin J, Rolet-Repecaud O, Duboz G, Leonil J, Mills CE, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Nov;54(11):1677-1689

In vitro gastrointestinal digestion of the major peach allergen Pru p 3, a lipid transfer protein: molecular characterization of the products and assessment of their IgE binding abilities.  
Cavatorta V, Sforza S, Aquino G, Galaverna G, Dossena A, Pastorello EA, Marchelli R.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Oct;54(10):1452-1457

Isolation, cloning, and characterization of the 2S albumin: a new allergen from hazelnut.  
Garino C, Zuidmeer L, Marsh J, Lovegrove A, Morati M, Versteeg S, Schilte P, Shewry P, Arlorio M, van RR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Sep;54(9):1257-1265

Effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on lentil allergenicity.  
Cabanillas B, Pedrosa MM, Rodriguez J, Gonzalez A, Muzquiz M, Cuadrado C, Crespo JF, Burbano C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Sep;54(9):1266-1272

Digestibility and allergenicity assessment of enzymatically crosslinked beta-casein.  
Stanic D, Monogioudi E, Dilek E, Radosavljevic J, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Vuckovic O, Raija L, Mattinen M, Buchert J, Cirkovic VT.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Sep;54(9):1273-1284

Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of Lep w 1, the major allergen of whiff.  
Griesmeier U, Bublin M, Radauer C, Vazquez-Cortes S, Ma Y, Fernandez-Rivas M, Breiteneder H.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Jun;54(6):861-869

What is the best strategy to reduce the burden of occupational asthma and allergy in bakers?  
Meijster T, Warren N, Heederik D, Tielemans E.
Occup Environ Med 2011 Mar;68(3):176-182

Further corroboration of the asthmagenicity of 5-aminosalicylic acid.  
Seed M, Agius R.
Occup Environ Med 2011 May;68(5):386

Medical surveillance programme for diisocyanate exposure.  
Labrecque M, Malo JL, Alaoui KM, Rabhi K.
Occup Environ Med 2011 Apr;68(4):302-307

Traffic-related air pollution and incident asthma in a high-risk birth cohort.  
Carlsten C, Dybuncio A, Becker A, Chan-Yeung M, Brauer M.
Occup Environ Med 2011 Apr;68(4):291-295

Parental perceptions and dietary adherence in children with seafood allergy.  
Ng IE, Turner PJ, Kemp AS, Campbell DE.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jul 13;

Total serum tryptase levels are higher in young infants.  
Belhocine W, Ibrahim Z, Grandne V, Buffat C, Robert P, Gras D, Cleach I, Bongrand P, Carayon P, Vitte J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jul 8;

Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, environmental tobacco smoke and asthma.  
Rosa MJ, Jung KH, Perzanowski MS, Kelvin EA, Darling KW, Camann DE, Chillrud SN, Whyatt RM, Kinney PL, Perera FP, Miller RL.
Respir Med 2011 Jun;105(6):869-876

Effects of allergen exposure on methacholine and AMP-induced air trapping in pollen-sensitive subjects.  
Lopez V, Prieto L, Perez C, Barato D, Marin J.
Respir Med 2011 Jun;105(6):856-863

Réactions d’hypersensibilité allergique et non allergique aux médicaments. Partie 1 : épidémiologie, génétique, physiopathologie, diagnostic, prévention, médicaments anti-infectieux / Hypersensitivity allergic and non allergic to medicines. Part 1: …  

Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):458-468
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie pollinique / Pollen allergy  
F. Rancé
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):413
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Qualité de l’air intérieur dans les écoles et asthme et allergies parmi les écoliers en Auvergne. Différences entre le milieu rural et le milieu urbain / Indoor air quality in schools and asthma and allergies among schoolchildren in Auvergne.  
M. Hulin, I. Annesi-Maesano, D. Caillaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):419-424
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Impact des changements climatiques sur la pollinose / Impact of climate change on pollinosis  
P. Richard
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):425-429
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Qualité de vie chez l’enfant avec allergie alimentaire : validation de la version française des questionnaires spécifiques de qualité de vie / Quality of life in children with food allergies: validation of the French version of the questionnaires . . .  
J. Wassenberg, M.-M. Cochard, A. DunnGalvin, B.M.J. de Blok, M. Hofer, P.A. Eigenmann
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):437-438
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Pathologie non allergique et exposition aux moisissures domestiques / Non-allergic disease and exposure to household mold  
A. Palot, C. Charpin-Kadouch, H. Dumon, D. Charpin
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):439-445
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Indications du bilan d’allergie aux venins d’hyménoptères. Génétique de l’allergie aux venins d’hyménoptères / Indications of the balance sheet of allergy to Hymenoptera venom. Genetics of allergy to Hymenoptera venom  
I. Sullerot, E. Girodet, J. Birnbaum and et Groupe de travail Insectes Piqueurs SFA-ANAFORCAL
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):449-450
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Choc anaphylactique au latex favorisé par l’oxytocine au cours d’un accouchement / Latex anaphylaxis enhanced by oxytocin during childbirth  
I. Luez, A. Nosbaum, P. Rouzaire, F. Bienvenu, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Bérard
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):451-453
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergologie moléculaire en pratique : exploration d’une patiente présentant une anaphylaxie d’effort / Molecular Allergy in Practice: exploration of a patient with exercise anaphylaxis  
C. Mailhol, A. Didier
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(4):454-455
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis: a New Zealand experience.  
Hill SE, Yung A, Rademaker M.
Australas J Dermatol 2011 Feb;52(1):27-31

Biologic-induced urticaria due to polysorbate 80: usefulness of prick test.  
Perez-Perez L, Garcia-Gavin J, Pineiro B, Zulaica A.
Br J Dermatol 2011 May;164(5):1119-1120

Epitope grafting, re-creating a conformational Bet v 1 antibody epitope on the surface of the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1.  
Holm J, Ferreras M, Ipsen H, Wurtzen PA, Gajhede M, Larsen JN, Lund K, Spangfort MD.
J Biol Chem 2011 May 20;286(20):17569-17578

Recognition of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 through the cysteine-rich domain of the mannose receptor determines its allergenicity.  
Emara M, Royer PJ, Abbas Z, Sewell HF, Mohamed GG, Singh S, Peel S, Fox J, Shakib F, Martinez-Pomares L, Ghaemmaghami AM.
J Biol Chem 2011 Apr 15;286(15):13033-13040

Glutaraldehyde-modified recombinant Fel d 1: a hypoallergen with negligible biological activity but retained immunogenicity  
Versteeg, Serge A.; Bulder, Ingrid; Himly, Martin; van Capel, Toni M.; van den Hout, R.; Koppelman, Stef J.; de Jong, Esther C.; Ferreira, Fatima; van Ree, Ronald
WAO Journal 2011;4(7):113-120
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Climate change, migration, and allergic respiratory diseases: an update for the allergist  
D'Amato, Gennaro; Rottem, Menachem; Dahl, Ronald; Blaiss, Michael S.; Ridolo, Erminia; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Rosario, Nelson; Motala, Cassim; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella
WAO Journal 2011;4(7):121-125
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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