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 Allergy Advisor Digest - July 2012
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read A population-based study of fish allergy in the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.
Read Antibodies to wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits in patients with celiac disease.
Read Nonallergic drug hypersensitivity reactions.
Read Wheat allergy in children; outgrowing the allergy?
Read Molecular allergens in the diagnosis of latex allergy.
Read Co-factor-enhanced food allergy.
Read A protocol to aid in the diagnosis of occupational asthma to Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole.
Read Analysis of mite allergic patients in a diverse territory by improved diagnostic tools.
Read Neural and behavioral correlates of food allergy.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis to colophonium in a sanitary pad
Read Assessment of environmental cockroach allergen exposure.
Read Animal lipocalin allergens.
Read Basophil reactivity, wheal size, and immunoglobulin levels distinguish degrees of cow's milk tolerance.
Read Molecular spreading and predictive value of preclinical IgE response to Phleum pratense in children with hay fever.
Read Infant origins of childhood asthma associated with specific molds.
Read Helminth glutathione-S transferase and the aeroallergen Bla g 5 share epitopes that can induce allergic cross-sensitization.
Read Winter season temperature drops and sulfur dioxide levels affect on exacerbation of refractory asthma
Read Changes in sensitization rate to weed allergens in children with increased weeds pollen counts in Seoul
Read Salami brusher's disease - a new type of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis
Read Ara h 1-, 2-, and 3-specific IgE antibodies is useful in diagnosis of peanut allergy in Japanese children.
Read Peanut seed storage proteins are responsible for clinical reactivity in Spanish peanut-allergic children.

Abstracts shared in July 2012 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Clinical and laboratory investigation of oral allergy syndrome to grape.
Read A case of dog-related human seminal plasma allergy.
Read Allergy to kiwi: is component-resolved diagnosis in routine clinical practice really impossible?
Read Anaphylaxis after a cat bite.
Read Allergy to beer in LTP-sensitized patients: beers are not all the same.
Read Ves v 5 can establish the diagnosis in patients without detectable specific IgE to wasp venom and a possible north-south difference in Api m 1 sensitization in Europe.
Read Stinkbug as a new aeroallergen.
Read Allergy to topical and oral goat products.
Read Sol i 2 & Sol i 4 venom proteins of queen red imported fire ants differ from worker ants.
Read The pholcodine case. cough medicines, IgE-sensitization, and anaphylaxis

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A population-based study of fish allergy in the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.
This study aimed to obtain an estimate of the population prevalence of fish allergy among older children in the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Fish allergy in 14- to 16-year-old children in the 3 countries was evaluated using a questionnaire distributed to students of randomly selected secondary schools. An extended questionnaire to determine convincing fish allergy on the basis of typical clinical manifestations within 2 h of ingestion was administered to those with positive responses. From acohort of 25,842 students, responses were 81.1% in the Philippines, 67.9% in Singapore and 80.2% in Thailand. Using criteria for convincing food allergy, fish allergy was much higher in the Philippines [2.29%] than in Singapore (0.26%) and Thailand (0.29%). Females were more likely to have fish allergy compared to males. Most allergies appeared mild, as only 28% of cases sought medical consultation at the time of the reaction and 31.2% of cases reported continued exposure despite allergic symptoms.

A population-based study of fish allergy in the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.  
Connett GJ, Gerez I, Cabrera-Morales EA, Yuenyongviwat A, Ngamphaiboon J, Chatchatee P, Sangsupawanich P, Soh SE, Yap GC, Shek LP, Lee BW.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 27;159(4):384-390

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Antibodies to wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits in patients with celiac disease.
Wheat gluten comprises gliadins and glutenins. The high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin subunits (GS)-1Dy10 are toxic for patients with celiac disease (CD). This study aimed to assess whether CD patients mount a serological response to HMW-GS-1Dy10. The study concludes that patients with untreated CD have raised antibody levels to HMW-GS-1Dy10, indicating the participation of these proteins in the adaptive immune response to gluten. Discrimination between CD patients and controls is not enhanced by deamidation of HMW-GS-1Dy10. Thus antibodies to these proteins are not useful markers for CD detection.

Antibodies to wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits in patients with celiac disease.  
Ellis HJ, Lozano-Sanchez P, Bermudo RC, Suligoj T, Biagi F, Bianchi PI, Corazza GR, De SA, Bravi E, Katakis I, O'Sullivan CK, Ciclitira PJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 17;159(4):428-434

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Nonallergic drug hypersensitivity reactions.
Nonallergic drug hypersensitivities do not involve either IgE-mediated (type 1) or delayed (type 4) hypersensitivity. Nonallergic hypersensitivities are commonly referred to as pseudoallergic or idiosyncratic reactions. The common nonallergic drug hypersensitivities are secondary to chemotherapeutic drugs, radiocontrast agents, vancomycin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, local anesthetic reactions and opiates. Protocols for skin testing of radiocontrast, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, local anesthetics and chemotherapeutic agents have been developed, though most have not been validated or standardized. Other diagnostic tests include in vitro-specific IgE tests, and the current 'gold' standard is usually an oral challenge or bronchoprovocation test. In the case of aspirin, even though it is not believed to be IgE-mediated, a 'desensitization' protocol has been developed and utilized successfully, although the mechanism of this desensitization is unclear.

Nonallergic drug hypersensitivity reactions.  
Farnam K, Chang C, Teuber S, Gershwin ME.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 25;159(4):327-345

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheat allergy in children; outgrowing the allergy?
The objective of this study was to evaluate the manifestations of wheat allergy and to follow the patients to evaluate whether outgrowing allergy occurs, and when. Eight previously diagnosed wheat allergic patients were re-evaluated together with 13 other new cases. Severe anaphylaxis was seen after wheat ingestion in more than 90% of the patients. Oral tolerance to wheat developed in three patients (37.5%) out of 8 known previous cases who had been followed for eight years, the mean age of oral tolerance to wheat was 68+/-6.36 (range; 36 months to 108 months). Clinical reactions in our wheat-allergic patients were more severe than those reported before. These patients were at risk for developing chronic allergic symptoms such as asthma. Oral tolerance to wheat was occuring in a minority of these patients.

Follow-up of the wheat allergy in children; consequences and outgrowing the allergy.  
Mansouri M, Pourpak Z, Mozafari H, Abdollah GF, Shokouhi SR.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;11(2):157-163

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular allergens in the diagnosis of latex allergy.
The aim of this study was to validate the most helpful allergens for the diagnosis of latex allergy in different clinical situations. 130 patients suspected to be allergic to latex with positive IgE against natural rubber latex (NRL) were studied: 97 were confirmed as latex allergic (among which 55 professionally exposed to latex and 35 with a peranaesthetic anaphylactic shock) and 33 were only sensitized to latex without clinical allergy. Each serum was tested for IgE against 9 recombinant latex allergens and bromelain. rHev b 6.01, 6.02, 2 and 5 were the major allergens in the allergic population. An excellent correlation (94%) was observed between IgE against rHev b 6.01 and latex prick test positivities. IgE against rHev b 1, 3 and 5 were more frequent and their levels significantly higher in patients with peranaesthetic anaphylactic shock. Among the asymptomatic patients (29/33 allergic to pollen),NRL IgE positivity is explained by the presence of anti-rHev b 8 and/or anti-carbohydrate IgE. Thus rHev b 6.01 and rHev b 5 specific IgE are of major interest to confirm latex allergy diagnosis. rHev b 5 is particularly useful in case of monosensitization where clinical symptoms and latex skin prick tests may be discordant. rHev b1 and rHev b 3 are interesting to document multi-operated and peranaesthetic latex allergy. Finally, rHev b 8 is a helpful marker to highlight latex/pollen cross-reactivity which improves the specificity of the serological tests.

Molecular allergens in the diagnosis of latex allergy.  
Garnier L, Selman L, Rouzaire P, Bouvier M, Roberts O, Berard F, Bienvenu J, Bienvenu F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):73-79

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Co-factor-enhanced food allergy.
Alcohol, exercise or non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAID) are frequently mentioned as amplifiers of food allergic reactions but only individual cases or small series have been previously published. A descriptive study including 74 cases of suspected co-factor enhanced food allergy, assessed by skin-prick tests, specific IgE and oral challenges, reports that anaphylaxis accounted for 85.1% of reactions. In 99% of cases culprit food allergens were plant-derived, mainly vegetables and cereals. NSAID were involved in 58%, exercise in 52.7% and alcohol in 12.2%. Lipid transfer protein was the most frequently involved allergen. The study concludes that co-factor enhanced food allergy should be considered when assessing food, alcohol, exercise and NSAID allergic reactions.

Co-factor-enhanced food allergy.  
Cardona V, Luengo O, Garriga T, Labrador-Horrillo M, Sala-Cunill A, Izquierdo A, Soto L, Guilarte M.
Allergy 2012 Jul 30;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A protocol to aid in the diagnosis of occupational asthma to Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole.
Occupational asthma has been described in workers exposed to aerosolized Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole. The authors present a protocol to aid in the diagnosis of this unique occupational asthma as well as the results of 11 inhalation challenges. A protocol to aid in the diagnosis of occupational asthma to Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole.

A protocol to aid in the diagnosis of occupational asthma to Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole.  
Altman LC, Ayars AG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 May;108(5):381-382

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of mite allergic patients in a diverse territory by improved diagnostic tools.
The objective of this study was to improve the diagnosis of mite allergic patients from a diverse territory in which D. pteronyssinus/D. farinae mites together with storage mites could be present in the environment. Four hundred and seventy-seven patients (both children and adults) from different regions, covering the main mite prevalent areas of Spain, were recruited. sIgE to eight allergens was measured together with SPT to whole mite extracts, level of mite allergen exposure, and specific IgG(4) . BAT and CAST was performed in a subgroup of patients. D. pteronyssinus and L. destructor were more prevalent in Atlantic areas, whereas D. farinae predominate in Mediterranean areas. About 90% of patients were sensitized to group 1 and/or group 2 allergens. Group 2 was the most prevalent, and the IgE response/intensity of sensitization in BAT was higher. sIgE to Der p 2/Der f 2 was almost fully cross-reactive, but no cross-reactivity was detected with Lep d 2. Group 1 allergens were also cross-reactive, but in some patients a species-specific response was observed. sIgE to Lep d 2 was associated with SPT results to storage mites. Sensitization to Der p 1 was more frequent in children, whereas Lep d 2 sensitization was more frequent in adults. A higher ratio IgE/IgG(4) to Der p 2 was associated with the presence of allergic asthma. The authors conclude that an improved diagnosis algorithm has been established. Group 2 allergens seem to have a leading role in mite allergy, but as group 1 sensitization could be species-specific in some patients and its prevalence is higher in children, an adequate balance on major mite species and major allergens must be consider in the design of mite allergy vaccines.

Analysis of mite allergic patients in a diverse territory by improved diagnostic tools.  
Barber D, Arias J, Boquete M, Cardona V, Carrillo T, Gala G, Gamboa P, Garcia-Robaina C, Hernandez D, Sanz L, Tabar AI, Vidal C, Ipsen H, de la TF, Lombardero M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Jul;42(7):1129-1138

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Neural and behavioral correlates of food allergy.
Food allergy accounts for a great number of reactions leading to diminished quality of life in western countries. There has been an abundance of reports of behavioral changes, as well as psychiatric conditions associated with food allergy over the past decades. Most of this field inspired little medical attention for its lack of a solid scientific ground. We review the literature on the association of food allergy and brain activity, leading to changes in emotion and behavior. Moreover, we describe an experimental paradigm employed to dissect the biological relevance of this association. Mice allergic to ovalbumin avoid a palatable sweet solution in order to escape contact with antigen. This choice is associated with increased levels of anxiety, compatible with a conflicting situation. These responses are associated with increased activity in brain areas associated with emotional and affective behavior, which are also important for anxiety and stress responses. Higher levels of corticosterone accompany these changes in behavior. These responses are mediated by specific antibodies and prevented by depletion or immunological tolerance. They are also partially mediated by C-sensitive afferents and mast cells. Far from anecdote, neural repercussions of food allergy should be considered when planning a therapeutic strategy in affected individuals

Neural and behavioral correlates of food allergy.  
Costa-Pinto FA, Basso AS.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2012;98222-239

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis to colophonium in a sanitary pad
Allergic contact dermatitis to colophonium in a sanitary pad: a report of a woman with chronic vulval irritation who had a positive patch test reaction to her own colophonium-containing sanitary pad.

Allergic contact dermatitis to colophonium in a sanitary pad-an overlooked allergen?  
Wujanto L, Wakelin S.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):161-162

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Assessment of environmental cockroach allergen exposure.
In the past, cockroach allergen exposure assessment mainly focused on settled dust in homes in low-income urban cities in the United States. That choice was not wrong; without measureable levels of cockroach allergen, it is difficult to show associations with any home characteristics, much less with health outcomes (e.g., allergy, asthma). However, recent studies in other suburban areas, schools, and other countries have elucidated the importance of cockroach allergen in these environments too. In addition, characterizing the underlying factors that give rise to cockroach allergen exposure (or protect against it) can lead to more targeted public health interventions. This review discusses different approaches to sampling indoor environments, interprets recent asthma and allergy studies, compares cockroach allergen levels from past studies with those of recent studies, and describes strategies for decreasing exposures

Assessment of environmental cockroach allergen exposure.  
Chew GL.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jul 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Animal lipocalin allergens.
Lipocalins represent the most important group of inhalant animal allergens. For some of them, three-dimensional protein structures have been resolved, but their functions are still elusive. Lipocalins generally display a low sequence identity between family members. The characterization of new lipocalin allergens has revealed however that some of them display a high sequence identity to lipocalins from another species. They constitute a new group of potentially cross-reactive molecules which, in addition to serum albumins, may contribute to allergic cross-reactions between animal dander of different species. However, the clinical relevance of cross-reactivity needs to be assessed. Further studies are needed to understand which of these animal lipocalins are the primary allergens and which are cross-reacting molecules.

Animal lipocalin allergens.  
Hilger C, Kuehn A, Hentges F.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jul 13;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Basophil reactivity, wheal size, and immunoglobulin levels distinguish degrees of cow's milk tolerance.
This study concludes that the majority of patients with milk allergy are able to tolerate some forms of baked milk in their diets. Different phenotypes of children with cow's milk allergy can be distinguished by casein- and milk-specific IgE levels, milk-specific basophil reactivity, and milk SPT mean wheal diameters. Spontaneous basophil activation is greater among patients with more severe clinical milk reactivity.

Basophil reactivity, wheal size, and immunoglobulin levels distinguish degrees of cow's milk tolerance.  
Ford LS, Bloom KA, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Shreffler WG, Masilamani M, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular spreading and predictive value of preclinical IgE response to Phleum pratense in children with hay fever.
This study sought to investigate the evolution at the molecular level and the preclinical predictive value of IgE responses against grass pollen.The German Multicentre Allergy Study examined a birth cohort born in 1990. One hundred seventy-seven of the 820 examined children had Grass pollen-related seasonal allergic rhinitis (SARg). A weak monomolecular/oligomolecular IgE response to P pratense was observed very frequently before SARg onset. These initial IgE responses increased in concentration and molecular complexity during the preclinical and clinical process. A typical progression of IgE sensitization was observed: Phl p 1 (initiator in >75% of cases); then Phl p 4 and Phl p 5; then Phl p 2, Phl p 6, and Phl p 11; and then Phl p 12 and Phl p 7. At age 3 years, IgE sensitization predicted SARg by age 12 years. At this preclinical prediction time, the number of recognized molecules and the serum levels of IgE to P pratense were significantly lower than at 3 or more years after SARg onset.

Molecular spreading and predictive value of preclinical IgE response to Phleum pratense in children with hay fever.  
Hatzler L, Panetta V, Lau S, Wagner P, Bergmann RL, Illi S, Bergmann KE, Keil T, Hofmaier S, Rohrbach A, Bauer CP, Hoffman U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, Wahn U, Matricardi PM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Infant origins of childhood asthma associated with specific molds.
The authors hypothesis was that specific mold exposures are associated with childhood asthma development. Infants were identified from birth certificates. Dust samples were collected from 289 homes when the infants were 8 months of age. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of 36 molds that comprise the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) and endotoxin, house dust mite, cat, dog, and cockroach allergens. Children were evaluated at age 7 years for asthma based on reported symptoms and objective measures of lung function. Host, environmental exposure, and home characteristics evaluated included a history of parental asthma, race, sex, upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms, season of birth, family income, cigarette smoke exposure, air conditioning, use of a dehumidifier, presence of carpeting, age of home, and visible mold at age 1 year and child's positive skin prick test response to aeroallergens and molds at age 7 years.

Asthma was diagnosed in 24% of the children at age 7 years. A statistically significant increase in asthma risk at age 7 years was associated with high ERMI values in the child's home in infancy. The summation of levels of 3 mold species, Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus unguis, and Penicillium variabile, was significantly associated with asthma. In this birth cohort study exposure during infancy to 3 mold species common to water-damaged buildings was associated with childhood asthma at age 7 years.

Infant origins of childhood asthma associated with specific molds.  
Reponen T, Lockey J, Bernstein DI, Vesper SJ, Levin L, Khurana Hershey GK, Zheng S, Ryan P, Grinshpun SA, Villareal M, Lemasters G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 10;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Helminth glutathione-S transferase and the aeroallergen Bla g 5 share epitopes that can induce allergic cross-sensitization.
The extensive similarities between helminth proteins and allergens are thought to contribute to helminth-driven allergic sensitization. This study investigated the cross-reactivity between a major glutathione-S transferase allergen of cockroach (Bla g 5) and the glutathione-S transferase of Wuchereria bancrofti (WbGST), a major lymphatic filarial pathogen of humans. These 2 proteins are 30% identical at the amino acid level with remarkable similarity in the N-terminal region and overall structural conservation based on predicted 3-dimensional models. Filarial infection was associated with IgE, IgG, and IgG(4) anti-Bla g 5 antibody production, with a significant correlation between antibodies (irrespective of isotype) to Bla g 5 and WbGST. Mice infected with H bakeri developed anti-HbGST IgE and showed immediate-type skin test reactivity to Bla g 5. These data demonstrate that helminth glutathione-S transferase and the aeroallergen Bla g 5 share epitopes that can induce allergic cross-sensitization.

Molecular mimicry between cockroach and helminth glutathione S-transferases promotes cross-reactivity and cross-sensitization.  
Santiago HC, Leevan E, Bennuru S, Ribeiro-Gomes F, Mueller E, Wilson M, Wynn T, Garboczi D, Urban J, Mitre E, Nutman TB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):248-256

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Winter season temperature drops and sulfur dioxide levels affect on exacerbation of refractory asthma
Exposure to temperature drops and increased sulfur dioxide concentrations are positively associated with the occurrence of acute RA exacerbation during winter with 1 or 2 day lags.

Winter season temperature drops and sulfur dioxide levels affect on exacerbation of refractory asthma in South Korea: a time-trend controlled case-crossover study using Soonchunhyang asthma cohort data.  
Kim S, Kim Y, Lee MR, Kim J, Jung A, Park JS, Jang AS, Park SW, Uh ST, Choi JS, Kim YH, Buckley T, Park CS.
J Asthma 2012 Jul 20;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Changes in sensitization rate to weed allergens in children with increased weeds pollen counts in Seoul
This Korean study evaluated the correlation between pollen count of weeds and their sensitization rate in Seoul, 1997-2009. Ragweed pollen gradually increased between 1999 and 2005, decreased after 2005 and plateaued until 2009. Japanese hop pollen increased between 2002 and 2009. Sensitization rates to weed pollen, especially ragweed and Japanese hop in children with allergic diseases, increased annually (ragweed, 2.2% in 2000 and 2.8% in 2002; Japanese hop, 1.4% in 2000 and 1.9% in 2002). The age for sensitization to pollen gradually became younger since 2000 (4 to 6 yr of age, 3.5% in 1997 and 6.2% in 2009; 7 to 9 yr of age, 4.2% in 1997 and 6.4% in 2009). In conclusion, sensitization rates for weed pollens increase in Korean children given increasing pollen counts of ragweed and Japanese hop.

Changes in sensitization rate to weed allergens in children with increased weeds pollen counts in Seoul metropolitan area.  
Kim JH, Oh JW, Lee HB, Kim SW, Kang IJ, Kook MH, Kim BS, Park KS, Baek HS, Kim KR, Choi YJ.
J Korean Med Sci 2012 Apr;27(4):350-355

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Salami brusher's disease - a new type of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis
Five consecutive cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in subjects working in a salami factory was observed. The workers had to clean the white mould growing on salami surface using a manual wire brush. Three patients had an acute clinical presentation with fever, dyspnoea, dry cough, oxygen desaturation, and presented at the emergency department with suspected diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia. The mean latency for developing respiratory symptoms was 11.6 days. Pulmonary function test demonstrated a reduction in diffusing capacity in all 5 patients. Skin prick test was positive for Penicillium spp in 3 cases and for Cladosporium and Aspergillus spp in 2 others. Specific IgG antibodies against Penicillium spp were positive in 3 subjects; 2 were positive for Aspergillus Fumigatus. Four subjects had a complete radiological and clinical resolution after changing work.

A new type of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis: salami brusher's disease.  
Marvisi M, Balzarini L, Mancini C, Mouzakiti P.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis 2012 Mar;77(1):35-37

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ara h 1-, 2-, and 3-specific IgE antibodies is useful in diagnosis of peanut allergy in Japanese children.
The aim was to evaluate IgE antibodies to peanut allergens in the diagnosis of peanut allergy in Japanese children using ImmunoCAP(®) and IgE immunoblotting. The study included 2-13-yr-old consecutive patients (n = 57). Serum samples were analyzed for IgE reactivity to peanut, recombinant ® Ara h 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and 9. IgE immunoblotting (n = 23) was performed using extracts from raw and roasted peanut. Twenty-six of the children failed (allergic group), and 31 passed the peanut challenge (tolerant group). The rAra h 2 ImmunoCAP test was superior in its ability to differentiate between children in the allergic and tolerant groups with a sensitivity and specificity of 88% and 84%, respectively. The combination of rAra h 1, 2, and 3 resulted in a higher specificity (94%) when IgE to all of them was the criteria for positivity. ImmunoCAP generally showed a good agreement with immunoblotting using both raw and roasted peanut for IgE reactivity to Ara h 1, 2, and 3. Therefore measurement of IgE antibodies to rAra h 1, 2, and 3 is useful in the diagnosis of peanut allergy and in the investigation of reactions to raw and roasted peanut.

Measurement of Ara h 1-, 2-, and 3-specific IgE antibodies is useful in diagnosis of peanut allergy in Japanese children.  
Ebisawa M, Moverare R, Sato S, Maruyama N, Borres MP, Komata T.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 26;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut seed storage proteins are responsible for clinical reactivity in Spanish peanut-allergic children.
Seed storage proteins (SSP; Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3) have been shown to be major peanut allergens, although recently, peanut lipid transfer protein has been reported to be an important allergen in the Mediterranean area. This study sought to investigate the sensitization pattern to peanut SSP and vegetable pan-allergens in a group of peanut-allergic children compared with a peanut-tolerant group. One hundred and twenty-three children who presented with food allergy were included in the study. Fifty-five of 123 children presented symptoms upon contact or ingestion. Frequency of sensitization to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 was 60.0%, 72.7%, and 43.6%, respectively, in the group of allergic children vs. 7.4%, 1.5%, and 7.4% in the group of tolerant children. Levels of specific IgE against Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 were significantly higher in the allergic group. The frequency of sensitization and the levels of specific IgE against Cor a 8 (36.4% vs. 16.2%) were significantly higher in the allergic children, whereas no significant differences were found for Pru p 3. No differences were seen for other pan-allergens. Patients sensitized to SSP, regardless of sensitization to nsLTP, were allergic rather than tolerant.

Peanut seed storage proteins are responsible for clinical reactivity in Spanish peanut-allergic children.  
Pedrosa M, Boyano-Martinez T, Garcia-Ara MC, Caballero T, Quirce S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 26;

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

A population-based study of fish allergy in the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.  
Connett GJ, Gerez I, Cabrera-Morales EA, Yuenyongviwat A, Ngamphaiboon J, Chatchatee P, Sangsupawanich P, Soh SE, Yap GC, Shek LP, Lee BW.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 27;159(4):384-390
Click to view abstract

Antibodies to wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits in patients with celiac disease.  
Ellis HJ, Lozano-Sanchez P, Bermudo RC, Suligoj T, Biagi F, Bianchi PI, Corazza GR, De SA, Bravi E, Katakis I, O'Sullivan CK, Ciclitira PJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 17;159(4):428-434
Click to view abstract

Unique and Cross-Reactive T Cell Epitope Peptides of the Major Bahia Grass Pollen Allergen, Pas n 1.  
Etto T, de BC, Prickett S, Gardner LM, Voskamp A, Davies JM, O'Hehir RE, Rolland JM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 25;159(4):355-366
Click to view abstract

Plant food allergy in patients with pollinosis from the Mediterranean area.  
Flores E, Cervera L, Sanz ML, az-Perales A, Fernandez J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 25;159(4):346-354
Click to view abstract

Nonallergic drug hypersensitivity reactions.  
Farnam K, Chang C, Teuber S, Gershwin ME.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 25;159(4):327-345
Click to view abstract

Follow-up of the wheat allergy in children; consequences and outgrowing the allergy.  
Mansouri M, Pourpak Z, Mozafari H, Abdollah GF, Shokouhi SR.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;11(2):157-163
Click to view abstract

Clinical and laboratory investigation of oral allergy syndrome to grape.  
Falak R, Sankian M, Tehrani M, Jabbari AF, Abolhasani A, Varasteh A.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;11(2):147-155
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Mouse (Mus m1) and rat (Rat n1) allergen levels in dust from private and public houses in Strasbourg, France are lower than houses in the U.S.A.  
Muti D, Purohit A, Dazy A, Verot A, de BF.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):93-95
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A case of dog-related human seminal plasma allergy.  
Kofler L, Kofler H, Mattsson L, Lidholm J.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):89-92
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Molecular allergens in the diagnosis of latex allergy.  
Garnier L, Selman L, Rouzaire P, Bouvier M, Roberts O, Berard F, Bienvenu J, Bienvenu F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):73-79
Click to view abstract

Diagnosed child, treated child: food challenge as the first step toward tolerance induction in cow's milk protein allergy.  
Longo G, Berti I, Barbi E, Calligaris L, Matarazzo L, Radillo O, Ronfani L, Ventura A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):54-60
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Allergy to kiwi: is component-resolved diagnosis in routine clinical practice really impossible?  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Apr;44(2):42-47
Click to view abstract

Specific oral tolerance induction in paediatric patients with persistent egg allergy.  
Fuentes-Aparicio V, varez-Perea A, Infante S, Zapatero L, D'Oleo A, onso-Lebrero E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2012 Jul 24;
Click to view abstract

Are new pets really responsible for development of new allergies?  
Liccardi G, D'Amato M, Pio A, Montera MC, Schiavo ML, Sapio C, D'Amato G.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2012 Jul 3;

Aspirin tolerance following omalizumab therapy in a patient with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Aksu K, Kurt E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2012 Jul 2;

Prevalence of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease in patients with asthma in Turkey: A cross-sectional survey.  
Bavbek S, Yilmaz I, Celik G, Aydin O, Erkekol FO, Orman A, Kurt E, Ediger D, Dursun B, Abadoglu O, Ozseker F, Akkaya E, Karakis GP, Canbakan S, Yuksel S, Misirligil Z.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2012 Jul;40(4):225-230
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis after a cat bite.  
Maeda Y, Akiyama K.
Allergol Int 2012 Jul 25;

Allergy to beer in LTP-sensitized patients: beers are not all the same.  
Quercia O, Zoccatelli G, Stefanini GF, Mistrello G, Amato S, Bolla M, Emiliani F, Asero R.
Allergy 2012 Jul 30;
Click to view abstract

Co-factor-enhanced food allergy.  
Cardona V, Luengo O, Garriga T, Labrador-Horrillo M, Sala-Cunill A, Izquierdo A, Soto L, Guilarte M.
Allergy 2012 Jul 30;
Click to view abstract

Can component-resolved diagnosis overturn the current knowledge on vespid allergy?  
Incorvaia C, Mauro M.
Allergy 2012 Jul;67(7):966-967

The role of basophil activation test in special populations with mastocytosis and reactions to hymenoptera sting.  
Bonadonna P, Zanotti R, Melioli G, Antonini F, Romano I, Lenzi L, Caruso B, Passalacqua G.
Allergy 2012 Jul;67(7):962-965
Click to view abstract

Diesel exhaust exposure, wheezing and sneezing.  
Bernstein DI.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Jul;4(4):178-183
Click to view abstract

CSACI Position statement on the testing of food-specific IgG.  
Carr S, Chan E, Lavine E, Moote W.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 26;8(1):12

A protocol to aid in the diagnosis of occupational asthma to Alaska pollock and Yellowfin sole.  
Altman LC, Ayars AG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 May;108(5):381-382

Allergen of the month-burr oak.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):A7

Delayed-onset cold anaphylaxis after hymenoptera sting.  
Wong CG, Borici-Mazi R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):77-78

Occupational allergy to rice involving alpha-amylase inhibitor as the relevant allergen.  
Gonzalez-De-Olano D, Pastor-Vargas C, Perez-Bustamante MS, Maroto AS, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Bartolome B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):71-72

Effect of Pru p 3 on dendritic cell maturation and T-lymphocyte proliferation in peach allergic patients.  
Gomez E, az-Perales A, Tordesillas L, Dona I, Torres MJ, Blazquez AB, Gomez F, Blanca M, Mayorga C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):52-58
Click to view abstract

Food and Drug Administration reclassification of allergens for diagnosis and treatment: now is the time to be heard.  
Larenas-Linnemann DE, Finegold I, Nelson H.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):6-9

It's about time for allergenic extracts to undergo review.  
Portnoy JM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jul;109(1):3-4

Cow's milk allergy and rolandic epilepsy: a close relationship?  
Lucarelli S, Spalice A, D'Alfonso Y, Lastrucci G, Sodano S, Topazio L, Frediani T.
Arch Dis Child 2012 May;97(5):481

Convenient, rapid and economic detection and semi-quantification of American cockroach allergen in the environment.  
Tungtrongchitr A, Sookrung N, Chaicumpa W, Indrawattana N, Poolphol R, Sae-Lim N, Weeravejsukit S, Bunnag GC, Vichyanond P.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun;30(2):99-106
Click to view abstract

Comparison of irritatant reactions between using lyophilized and commercial food allergen extracts in atopy patch tests in a normal population.  
Boonyaviwat O, Pacharn P, Piboonpocanun O, Vichyanond P, Visitsunthorn N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun;30(2):158-161
Click to view abstract

Analysis of mite allergic patients in a diverse territory by improved diagnostic tools.  
Barber D, Arias J, Boquete M, Cardona V, Carrillo T, Gala G, Gamboa P, Garcia-Robaina C, Hernandez D, Sanz L, Tabar AI, Vidal C, Ipsen H, de la TF, Lombardero M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Jul;42(7):1129-1138

Monitoring neutrophils and platelets during casein-induced anaphylaxis in an experimental BALB/c mouse model.  
Krishnamurthy D, Starkl P, Szalai K, Roth-Walter F, Diesner SC, Mittlboeck M, Mannhalter C, Untersmayr E, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Jul;42(7):1119-1128
Click to view abstract

Distinct temporal patterns of immediate asthmatic reactions due to high- and low-molecular-weight agents.  
Malo JL, Ghezzo H, L'archeveque J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Jul;42(7):1021-1027
Click to view abstract

Neural and behavioral correlates of food allergy.  
Costa-Pinto FA, Basso AS.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2012;98222-239
Click to view abstract

Allergen-induced neuromodulation in the respiratory tract.  
Weigand LA, Undem BJ.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2012;98142-162
Click to view abstract

The strategies that peanut and nut-allergic consumers employ to remain safe when travelling abroad.  
Barnett J, Botting N, Gowland MH, Lucas JS.
Clin Transl Allergy 2012 Jul 9;2(1):12
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to colophonium in a sanitary pad-an overlooked allergen?  
Wujanto L, Wakelin S.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):161-162

Assessment of environmental cockroach allergen exposure.  
Chew GL.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jul 24;
Click to view abstract

Animal lipocalin allergens.  
Hilger C, Kuehn A, Hentges F.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jul 13;
Click to view abstract

Time for new methods for avoidance of house dust mite and other allergens.  
Tovey E, Ferro A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jul 26;
Click to view abstract

Symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema secondary to topical 5-fluorouracil.  
Powers R, Gordon R, Roberts K, Kovach R.
Cutis 2012 May;89(5):225-228
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in childhood and adolescence. [German]  
Ott H.
Hautarzt 2012 Feb;63(2):97-103
Click to view abstract

Basophil reactivity, wheal size, and immunoglobulin levels distinguish degrees of cow's milk tolerance.  
Ford LS, Bloom KA, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Shreffler WG, Masilamani M, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 19;
Click to view abstract

Ves v 5 can establish the diagnosis in patients without detectable specific IgE to wasp venom and a possible north-south difference in Api m 1 sensitization in Europe.  
Sturm GJ, Bilo MB, Bonadonna P, Hemmer W, Caruso B, Bokanovic D, Aberer W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 11;

Molecular spreading and predictive value of preclinical IgE response to Phleum pratense in children with hay fever.  
Hatzler L, Panetta V, Lau S, Wagner P, Bergmann RL, Illi S, Bergmann KE, Keil T, Hofmaier S, Rohrbach A, Bauer CP, Hoffman U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, Wahn U, Matricardi PM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 25;
Click to view abstract

Ambient pollen concentrations and emergency department visits for asthma and wheeze.  
Darrow LA, Hess J, Rogers CA, Tolbert PE, Klein M, Sarnat SE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 26;
Click to view abstract

Amikacin-induced drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome: Delayed skin test and ELISPOT assay results allow the identification of the culprit drug.  
Bensaid B, Rozieres A, Nosbaum A, Nicolas JF, Berard F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 26;

Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome can occur in adults.  
Fernandes BN, Boyle RJ, Gore C, Simpson A, Custovic A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 24;

Food allergy-related quality of life after double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in adults, adolescents, and children.  
van d, Flokstra-de Blok BM, de GH, Oude-Elberink JN, Kerkhof M, Duiverman EJ, Dubois AE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 24;
Click to view abstract

The brown marmorated stinkbug as a new aeroallergen.  
Mertz TL, Jacobs SB, Craig TJ, Ishmael FT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 24;

Infant origins of childhood asthma associated with specific molds.  
Reponen T, Lockey J, Bernstein DI, Vesper SJ, Levin L, Khurana Hershey GK, Zheng S, Ryan P, Grinshpun SA, Villareal M, Lemasters G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul 10;
Click to view abstract

Accurate oral food challenge requires a cumulative dose on a subsequent day.  
Niggemann B, Lange L, Finger A, Ziegert M, Muller V, Beyer K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):261-263

A self-regulation intervention can improve quality of life for families with food allergy.  
Baptist AP, Dever SI, Greenhawt MJ, Polmear-Swendris N, McMorris MS, Clark NM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):263-265

Molecular mimicry between cockroach and helminth glutathione S-transferases promotes cross-reactivity and cross-sensitization.  
Santiago HC, Leevan E, Bennuru S, Ribeiro-Gomes F, Mueller E, Wilson M, Wynn T, Garboczi D, Urban J, Mitre E, Nutman TB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):248-256

Intrauterine sensitization of allergen-specific IgE analyzed by a highly sensitive new allergen microarray.  
Kamemura N, Tada H, Shimojo N, Morita Y, Kohno Y, Ichioka T, Suzuki K, Kubota K, Hiyoshi M, Kido H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):113-121
Click to view abstract

Winter season temperature drops and sulfur dioxide levels affect on exacerbation of refractory asthma in South Korea: a time-trend controlled case-crossover study using Soonchunhyang asthma cohort data.  
Kim S, Kim Y, Lee MR, Kim J, Jung A, Park JS, Jang AS, Park SW, Uh ST, Choi JS, Kim YH, Buckley T, Park CS.
J Asthma 2012 Jul 20;
Click to view abstract

Changes in sensitization rate to weed allergens in children with increased weeds pollen counts in Seoul metropolitan area.  
Kim JH, Oh JW, Lee HB, Kim SW, Kang IJ, Kook MH, Kim BS, Park KS, Baek HS, Kim KR, Choi YJ.
J Korean Med Sci 2012 Apr;27(4):350-355
Click to view abstract

Potential association of DCBLD2 polymorphisms with fall rates of FEV(1) by aspirin provocation in Korean asthmatics.  
Park TJ, Kim JH, Park BL, Cheong HS, Bae JS, Pasaje CF, Park JS, Uh ST, Kim MK, Choi IS, Park CS, Shin HD.
J Korean Med Sci 2012 Apr;27(4):343-349
Click to view abstract

Asthma forecast: why heat, humidity trigger symptoms.  
Voelker R.
JAMA 2012 Jul 4;308(1):20

A new type of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis: salami brusher's disease.  
Marvisi M, Balzarini L, Mancini C, Mouzakiti P.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis 2012 Mar;77(1):35-37

Work-related asthma in France: recent trends for the period 2001-2009.  
Paris C, Ngatchou-Wandji J, Luc A, McNamee R, sefa-Colas L, Larabi L, Telle-Lamberton M, Herin F, Bergeret A, Bonneterre V, Brochard P, Choudat D, Dupas D, Garnier R, Pairon JC, Agius RM, Ame.
Occup Environ Med 2012 Jun;69(6):391-397
Click to view abstract

Paraquat application and respiratory health effects among South Korean farmers.  
Cha ES, Lee YK, Moon EK, Kim YB, Lee YJ, Jeong WC, Cho EY, Lee IJ, Hur J, Ha M, Lee WJ.
Occup Environ Med 2012 Jun;69(6):398-403
Click to view abstract

Contact dermatitis due to dipentene and pine oil in an automobile mechanic.  
D'Erme AM, Francalanci S, Milanesi N, Ricci L, Gola M.
Occup Environ Med 2012 Jun;69(6):452

Measurement of Ara h 1-, 2-, and 3-specific IgE antibodies is useful in diagnosis of peanut allergy in Japanese children.  
Ebisawa M, Moverare R, Sato S, Maruyama N, Borres MP, Komata T.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 26;
Click to view abstract

Peanut seed storage proteins are responsible for clinical reactivity in Spanish peanut-allergic children.  
Pedrosa M, Boyano-Martinez T, Garcia-Ara MC, Caballero T, Quirce S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jul 26;
Click to view abstract

Respiratory effects associated with wood fuel use: a cross-sectional biomarker study among adolescents.  
Van ME, Sardella A, Nickmilder M, Bernard A.
Pediatr Pulmonol 2012 Apr;47(4):358-366
Click to view abstract

Photopatch testing comes of age.  
Sarkany RP.
Br J Dermatol 2012 May;166(5):912-913

A European multicentre photopatch test study.  

Br J Dermatol 2012 May;166(5):1002-1009
Click to view abstract

Clozapine-induced symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema: first reported cases.  
Rao A, Francis N, Morar N.
Br J Dermatol 2012 May;166(5):1142-1143

Allergy to topical and oral goat products.  
Mullins RJ.
MJA 2012;197(3):148-149.

Identification, expression, and immuno-reactivity of Sol i 2 & Sol i 4 venom proteins of queen red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).  
Lockwood SA, Haghipour-Peasley J, Hoffman DR, Deslippe RJ.
Toxicon 2012 Jun 5. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

The pholcodine case. cough medicines, IgE-sensitization, and anaphylaxis: a devious connection  
Florvaag E. Johansson SGO.
WAO Journal 2012;5(7):73–78
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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