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 Allergy Advisor Digest - March 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read House dust mites as an allergen source in henhouse
Read Occurence and hygienic/ allergological relevance of mould
Read Application of recombinant allergens in allergologic diagnostics
Read Frozen native food allergens applied to prick-skin test are stable for months up to years
Read Rush specific oral tolerance induction in school-age children with severe egg allergy: one year follow up.
Read Antacids and dietary supplements with an influence on the gastric pH increase the risk for food sensitization.
Read The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.
Read Clinical value of negative skin tests to iodinated contrast media.
Read Occupational immediate-type asthma and rhinitis due to rhodium salts.
Read Exposure to the airborne mould Botrytis and its health effects.
Read Oral allergy syndrome: a clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenge.
Read Pest and allergen exposure and abatement in inner-city asthma.
Read Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy.
Read Key nasal symptoms predicting a positive skin test in allergic rhinitis and patient characteristics according to ARIA classification.
Read Occupational asthma and allergy in snow crab processing in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Read Partially hydrolysed formula based on rice protein in the treatment of infants with cow's milk protein allergy.
Read Hypersensitivity pneumonitis with proteolytic enzymes from Bacillus subtilis

Abstracts shared in March 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Sensitization to casein and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) in children with cow's milk allergy.
Read IgE reactivity in 23 077 subjects using an allergenic molecule-based microarray detection system.
Read Thaumatin-like protein and baker's respiratory allergy.
Read Threshold dose for peanut: Risk characterization - oral challenge of 286 peanut-allergic individuals.
Read Prevalence of Tyrophagus putrescentiae hypersensitivity in subjects over 70 years of age in a veterans' nursing home in Taiwan.
Read Measurement of IgE antibodies to shrimp tropomyosin is superior to skin prick testing
Read The natural history of soy allergy.
Read Characterization, antigenicity and detection of fish gelatine and isinglass used as processing aids in wines.
Read Specific profiles of house dust mite sensitization in children with asthma and in children with eczema.
Read Angioedema secondary to gastrointestinal reflux?

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
House dust mites as an allergen source in henhouse
Storage mites (SM) are important allergen sources in the working environment of German farms. 29 samples of dust from ten henhouses were analysed. House dust mites (HDM) in both high abundance and steadiness were found. 92.1% of all mites found were domestic mites (DM = HDM + SM), whereby 52.3% of the DM found belonged to the HDM. 13 DM species (ten SM, three HDM) could be identified. 24/29 samples contained 2,452 HDM and 2,237 SM (= 4,689 DM in 24 g of dust). Summarizing abundance and steadiness showed the followings ranking: Lepidoglyphus destructor > Dermatophagoides farinae > Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus > Euroglyphus longior > Thyreophagus entomophagus > Glycyphagus domesticus > Acarus siro > Tyrophagus longior > Tyrophagus palmarum > Acarus immobilis > Glycyphagus geniculatus > Acarus farris > Gohieria fusca.

Original Article House dust mites as an allergen source in henhouses  
J.-T. Franz, H. Müsken
Allergo J 2010;1:106 -

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occurence and hygienic/ allergological relevance of mould
In a health study of the State Health Agency (LGA) children attending Class 4 of a primary school were tested by an in-vitro allergy screening for the mould allergens mx1 (Penicillium chrysogenum m1, Cladosporium herbarum m2, Aspergillus fumigatus m3 and Alternaria alternata m6). About 5% of the children were sensitized against mould associated with the ambient air. Most of the children were sensitized against Alternaria alternata and IgE-concentration was highest for Alternaria alternata. Children with sensitization against mould were often polysensitized. It was unclear if the allergy screening for mould mx1 included moulds indicative of the indoor moulds such as Acremonium spp., Aspergillus penicillioides, Aspergillus restrictus, Aspergillus versicolor, Chaetomium spp., Phialophora spp., Stachybotrys chartarum, Tritirachium (Engyodontium) album and Trichoderma spp. as a result of crossreactvity.

Occurence and hygienic/ allergological relevance of mould from point of view of the environmental medicine  
T. Gabrio und U. Weidner
Allergologie 2010;33(3):101-

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Application of recombinant allergens in allergologic diagnostics
"Allergological diagnostics and therapy are performed with native allergen extracts so far. These extracts contain a mixture of proteins from pure allergen sources of different allergenicity. With the introduction of genetic engineering techniques single allergen components can be separated and recombinantly produced. The importance of single allergen proteins is explained by the example of timothy grass and birch pollen, which reflect leading allergens in their plant families. Timothy grass reaches its high allergenicity by the marker allergens Phl p 1 and 5 as major allergens and Phl p 7 and 12 as minor allergens. In analogy Bet v 1 is the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 2 and 4 are the relevant minor allergens. IgE antibodies (AB) against minor allergens lead in the absence of major allergen AB to an apparent poly-sensitization. These minor allergens represent profilins and calcium-binding proteins (CBP) as pan-allergen families. Profilins as well as CBPs have high rates of cross reactivity in their groups und can be responsible for the intolerance of many vegetable and animal foods. Further relevant pan-allergen families are tropomyosins, prolamins, and cupins. In summary, recombinant allergens provide the expansion of the diagnostic spectrum in serological allergy diagnostics. By excellent IgE binding ability, recombinant allergens are suitable for cutaneous as well as for in vitro diagnostics. This turns out to be a special advantage in clinical practice in the detection of primary allergies in poly-sensitized patients. In the future patient-tailored therapies and preventive vaccinations are imaginable."

Application of recombinant allergens in allergologic diagnostics  
G. Mühlmeier und H. Maier
Allergologie 2010;33(3):114-

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Frozen native food allergens applied to prick-skin test are stable for months up to years
"In 2001 we described a new technique of freezing allergens in the form of juice or pulp for skin prick test. Frozen allergens without interruption of freezing were tested 4 month up to 8 years after freezing. All these frozen native allergens turned out still to produce positive skin tests after these long periods of freezing. This observation is an important condition to apply frozen allergens for prick skin test."

Frozen native food allergens applied to prick-skin test are stable for months up to years  
J. Sennekamp und M. Joest
Allergologie 2010;33(3):97-

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Rush specific oral tolerance induction in school-age children with severe egg allergy: one year follow up.
The objectives of this study was to perform rush SOTI for school-age patients with severe egg allergy, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this method for one year. Six school-age children (7-12 years of age) with severe IgE-mediated egg allergy confirmed by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) underwent rush SOTI, in which patients ingested increasing doses of egg several times every day. After rush SOTI, patients ingested the maintenance dose of egg at least twice a week. In DBPCFC, the median threshold dose of egg white inducing allergic reactions was 0.152 g (0.012-0.360 g). All subjects acquired tolerance to more than one whole egg (60 g). It took only 12 days (9-18 days). None experienced any serious reaction.

Rush specific oral tolerance induction in school-age children with severe egg allergy: one year follow up.  
Itoh N, Itagaki Y, Kurihara K.
Allergol Int 2010 Mar;59(1):43-51

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Antacids and dietary supplements with an influence on the gastric pH increase the risk for food sensitization.
Elevation of the gastric pH increases the risk for sensitization against food allergens by hindering protein breakdown. This can be caused by acid-suppressing medication like sucralphate, H2-receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, as shown in recent murine experimental and human observational studies.

The aim of this study was to assess the sensitization capacity of the dietary supplement base powder and of over-the-counter antacids. To examine the in vivo influence, BALB/c mice were fed codfish extract with one of the acid-suppressing substances. The pH of hydrochloric acid was substantially increased in vitro by base powder as well as antacids in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This elevation hindered the digestion of codfish proteins in vitro. A significant increase in codfish-specific IgE antibodies was found in the groups fed codfish combined with Rennie((R)) Antacidum or with base powder; the latter also showed significantly elevated IgG1 and IgG2a levels. The induction of an anaphylactic immune response was proven by positive results in intradermal skin tests. The study demonstates that antacids and dietary supplements influence the gastric pH and increase the risk for sensitization against allergenic food proteins. As these substances are commonly used in the general population without consulting a physician, this may have a practical and clinical impact.

Antacids and dietary supplements with an influence on the gastric pH increase the risk for food sensitization.  
Pali-Scholl I, Herzog R, Wallmann J, Szalai K, Brunner R, Lukschal A, Karagiannis P, Diesner SC, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar 4;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.
"Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated radio contrast media (RCM) are either immediate-type (IT) or delayed reactions (DT). In IT, the pathomechanism is unclear. In DT, delayed positive patch (PT) and intradermal tests (IDT) and RCM-specific T cells suggest a T cell-mediated mechanism. In both, the role of iodine has not been clarified; however, patients are often labelled as 'iodine allergic'. Occasionally, positive skin tests to iodine-containing drugs are observed. "

The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of hypersensitivity to iodine in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. In the IT group, skin tests were positive in three out of nine patients to one RCM. One patient with negative skin tests reacted twice to oral iodine with urticaria. In the DT group, sensitization to one or several RCM was identified in 10 out of 10 patients. In seven out of 10 patients, additional sensitizations to the iodine formulations were found. Two patients developed a mild exanthema after oral provocation with Lugol's solution (LS). The authors conclude that they had previously demonstrated in patients with iodine mumps that an oral challenge with LS is a valid means to elicit hypersensitivity reactions to iodine. In 19 patients, iodine was shown to be rarely the eliciting agent in hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. Only one patient with a late urticaria to an RCM with a late urticaria to LS and two patients with DT and broad sensitization to all RCM tested reacted to LS with an exanthema. In most cases, more likely the RCM molecules and not iodine are the eliciting compounds.

The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.  
Scherer K, Harr T, Bach S, Bircher AJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar;40(3):468-475

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical value of negative skin tests to iodinated contrast media.
Skin testing for iodinated contrast medium hypersensitivity has a negative predictive value of 96.6% (95% CI: 89.9-103.2) and none of the reactions in skin-test-negative patients were severe. Multi-centric large surveys are still needed for confirmation.

Clinical value of negative skin tests to iodinated contrast media.  
Caimmi S, Benyahia B, Suau D, Bousquet-Rouanet L, Caimmi D, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar 12;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational immediate-type asthma and rhinitis due to rhodium salts.
A 27-year-old atopic operator of an electroplating plant developed work-related shortness of breath and runny nose with sneezing after exposure to rhodium salts. The patient showed positive SPT reactions and positive bronchial immediate-type reactions with rhodium and platinum salts. Sensitivity to rhodium salt was much higher than to platinum salt; the molar concentrations differed by a factor of 256 in SPT and a factor of 16 in bronchial challenges. Rhodium salts should be considered as occupational immediate-type allergens.

Occupational immediate-type asthma and rhinitis due to rhodium salts.  
Merget R, Sander I, van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Ulmer HM, Kulzer R, Bruening T.
Am J Ind Med 2010 Jan;53(1):42-46

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Exposure to the airborne mould Botrytis and its health effects.
"In this review, we investigate the airborne exposure level and health effect of Botrytis, both at general exposure and in occupational settings. The surveyed papers show that Botrytis is found globally with different spore seasons depending on the region investigated. The levels of Botrytis in the percentage of all fungi have a calculated median of around 1.1% in the different environments, confirming that it is among the less prevalent fungi. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients and workers are allergic to Botrytis cinerea, and when B. cinerea was included in extended test panels additional allergic patients were found. Thus, B. cinerea is as important as the more prevalent mould genera Cladosporium and Alternaria and we suggest that it should be included in standard allergic tests panels."

Exposure to the airborne mould Botrytis and its health effects.  
Jurgensen CW, Madsen A.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2009 Dec;16(2):183-196

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oral allergy syndrome: a clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenge.
The purpose of this article was to provide a review of the literature and discuss the clinical, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges of oral allergy syndrome (OAS). OAS occurs in patients with a prior cross-reactive aeroallergen sensitization and clinically presents with initial oralpharyngeal symptoms after ingestion of a triggering fruit or vegetable. Although controversial, these symptoms may progress to systemic symptoms outside the gastrointestinal tract in 8.7% of patients and anaphylactic shock in 1.7%. OAS's underlying pathophysiology may play a role in clinical presentation and outcome, depending on whether the cross-reactive protein is a heat-labile PR-10 protein, a partially labile profilin, or a relatively heat-stable lipid transfer protein. Diagnostic testing is variable based on the underlying food tested, but fresh food skin prick test typically has the highest sensitivity. Treatment centers on avoidance and the consideration of self-injectable epinephrine. Because of its relationship with a cross-reactive aeroallergen sensitization, subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy have also been therapeutically tried with mixed results.

Oral allergy syndrome: a clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenge.  
Webber CM, England RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):101-108

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pest and allergen exposure and abatement in inner-city asthma.
"Our work group report details the importance of pest allergen exposure in inner-city asthma. We will focus specifically on mouse and cockroach exposure. We will discuss how exposure to these pests is common in the inner city and what conditions exist in urban areas that might lead to increased exposure. We will discuss how exposure is associated with allergen sensitization and asthma morbidity. Finally, we will discuss different methods of intervention and the effectiveness of these tactics"

Pest and allergen exposure and abatement in inner-city asthma: a work group report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Indoor Allergy/Air Pollution Committee.  
Sheehan WJ, Rangsithienchai PA, Wood RA, Rivard D, Chinratanapisit S, Perzanowski MS, Chew GL, Seltzer JM, Matsui EC, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar;125(3):575-581

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy.
Results of this study demonstrated that subjects with milk allergy had increased epitope diversity compared with those who outgrew their allergy. heated milk (HM)-tolerant subjects had IgE-binding patterns similar to those who had outgrown their allergy, but IgG4-binding patterns that were more similar to those of the allergic group. Binding to higher numbers of IgE peptides was associated with more severe allergic reactions during challenge. There was no association between IgG4 peptides and clinical features of milk allergy. Allergic patients demonstrated a combination of high- and low-affinity IgE binding, whereas HM-tolerant subjects and those who had outgrown their milk allergy had primarily low-affinity binding. Therefore greater IgE epitope diversity and higher affinity, as determined by using the peptide microarray, were associated with clinical phenotypes and severity of milk allergy.

Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy.  
Wang J, Lin J, Bardina L, Goldis M, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Shreffler WG, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar;125(3):695-702, 702

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Key nasal symptoms predicting a positive skin test in allergic rhinitis and patient characteristics according to ARIA classification.
In this Thai study of patients with allergic rhinitis, of 434 patients, 277 (63.8%) were skin prick test positive.

Results of allergen skin prick tests: 277 patients

Allergen - pos - Percent

D.farinae - 229 (82.7)

D. pteronyssinus - 225 (81.2)

House dust - 180 (65.0)

American cockroach - 156 (56.3)

Bermuda grass - 65 (23.5)

Feather - 42 (15.2)

Johnson grass - 39 (14.1)

Cat - 36 (13.0)

Kapok - 25 (9.0)

Cotton - 26 (9.4)

Dog - 11 (4.0)

Penicillium - 9 (3.2)

Alternaria - 6 (2.2)

Aspergillus - 6 (2.2) (Chaiyasate 2009 ref.23808 7)

Key nasal symptoms predicting a positive skin test in allergic rhinitis and patient characteristics according to ARIA classification.  
Chaiyasate S, Roongrotwattanasiri K, Fooanant S, Sumitsawan Y.
Miscellaneous J Med Assoc Thai 2009 Mar;92(3):377-81.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma and allergy in snow crab processing in Newfoundland and Labrador.
The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of occupational asthma (OA) and occupational allergy (OAl) in snow crab-processing workers n Newfoundland and Labrador and to determine their relationship with exposure to snow crab allergens and other potential risk factors. 215 workers (120 female/95 male) were recruited. The prevalences of almost certain or highly probable OA and OAl were 15.8% and 14.9%, respectively. A high cumulative exposure to crab allergens, in jobs mostly held by women, was associated with OA and with OAl; job held when symptoms started (cleaning, packing, freezing) also predicted OA. Atopy, female gender and smoking were significant determinants for OA.

Occupational asthma and allergy in snow crab processing in Newfoundland and Labrador.  
Gautrin D, Cartier A, Howse D, Horth-Susin L, Jong M, Swanson M, Lehrer S, Fox G, Neis B.
Occup Environ Med 2010 Jan;67(1):17-23

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Partially hydrolysed formula based on rice protein in the treatment of infants with cow's milk protein allergy.
A prospective open, randomized clinical study to compare the clinical tolerance of a new hydrolysed rice protein formula (HRPF) with an extensively hydrolysed CMP formula (EHF) in the feeding of infants with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy was conducted in 92 infants aged 1.1-10.1 months diagnosed with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy. Patients were randomized to receive either an EHF based on CMP or a new HRPF. Follow-up was at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Growth parameters were measured at each visit. One infant showed immediate allergic reaction to EHF, but no reaction was shown by any infant in the HRPF group. HRPF was well tolerated by infants with moderate to severe symptoms of IgE-mediated CMP allergy. Children receiving this formula showed similar growth and development of clinical tolerance to those receiving an EHF.

The effect of a partially hydrolysed formula based on rice protein in the treatment of infants with cow's milk protein allergy.  
Reche M, Pascual C, Fiandor A, Polanco I, Rivero-Urgell M, Chifre R, Johnston S, Martin-Esteban M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar 10;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis with proteolytic enzymes from Bacillus subtilis
The authors report a case of a worker who was exposed to proteolytic enzymes of Bacillus subtilis while soaking clothes. A diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis was based on the clinical presentation (dyspnoea, fever, crepitations) and the results of complimentary investigations. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to proteolytic enzymes of B. subtilis is rare and not recognized as an occupational disease in Tunisia.

Pneumopathie d’hypersensibilité aux enzymes protéolytiques du Bacillus subtilis dans l’industrie de délavage des Jean. / Hypersensitivity pneumonitis with proteolytic enzymes from Bacillus subtilis in the industry washout of John. Presentation of a case  
A. Benzarti Mezni, N. Mhiri, M. Beji, A. Ben Jemaa
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(2):77-81

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Sensitization to casein and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) in children with cow's milk allergy. [Japanese]  
Nakano T, Shimojo N, Morita Y, Arima T, Tomiita M, Kohno Y.
Arerugi 2010 Feb;59(2):117-122
Click to view abstract

Highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of allergens from Dermatophagoides, DER p 1 and DER f 1. [Japanese]  
Kondoh M, Fukada K, Shimada T, Kitamura Y, Yasueda H, Enomoto T.
Arerugi 2010 Feb;59(2):109-116

To promise personalized medicine: development of world's fastest SNP detection method to circumvent drug-induced adverse reactions. [Japanese]  
Ishikawa T, Aw W, Lezhava A, Hayashizaki Y.
Arerugi 2010 Feb;59(2):98-108

Immediate type hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents in pediatric patients.  
Visitsunthorn N, Utsawapreechawong W, Pacharn P, Jirapongsananuruk O, Vichyanond P.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2009 Dec;27(4):191-197
Click to view abstract

What's eating you? Cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis).  
Golomb MR, Golomb HS.
Cutis 2010 Jan;85(1):10-11

Recurrent angioedema associated with efalizumab.  
Mallbris L, von BF, van HM, Stahle M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2009 Nov;89(6):665-666

In-vitro-Diagnostik im Fokus.  
H. F. Merk, T. Jakob
Allergo J 2010;1:81 -
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergy News Augen auf bei alten Antihistaminika Seelische Spätfolgen Der Smiley-Test: Erkennen uns Bienen? Exotische Dermatitis Silikon-Allergie bei Herzschrittmacher  

Allergo J 2010;1:86 -
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Journal Club Erdnüsse für Mäusemütter – Anaphylaxieschutz für Mäusekinder Allergieprävention durch Synbiotika?  

Allergo J 2010;1:88 -
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Guidelines In vitro allergy diagnostics  
H. Renz, T. Biedermann, A. Bufe, B. Eberlein, U. Jappe, M. Ollert, A. Petersen, J. Kleine-Tebbe, M. Raulf-Heimsoth, J. Saloga, T. Werfel, M. Worm
Allergo J 2010;1:110 -
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

CME In-vitro-Allergiediagnostik  

Allergo J 2010;1:129 -
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Methods of in-vitro allergy diagnostic  
R. Wahl und R. Krause
Allergologie 2010;33(3):121-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Position paper Fructose malabsorption  
C. Schäfer, I. Reese, B.K. Ballmer-Weber et al.
Allergologie 2010;33(3):134-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

A case of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome-like symptoms following HHV-6 encephalopathy.  
Saida S, Yoshida A, Tanaka R, Abe J, Hamahata K, Okumura M, Momoi T.
Allergol Int 2010 Mar;59(1):83-86
Click to view abstract

Role of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in the modulation of pollinosis induced by pollen antigens.  
Hashimoto M, Sato EF, Hiramoto K, Kasahara E, Inoue M.
Allergol Int 2010 Mar 25;59(2):

Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis exclusively during menstruation.  
Fischer J, Schuck E, Biedermann T.
Allergy 2010 Mar 19;

Fish allergy: in Cyp c1 we trust.  
Agabriel C, Robert P, Bongrand P, Sarles J, Vitte J.
Allergy 2010 Mar 22;

Oral mite anaphylaxis.  
Sanchez-Machin I, Glez-Paloma PR, Iglesias-Souto J, Iraola V, Matheu V.
Allergy 2010 Mar 10;

Anaphylaxis after consuming soy products in patients with birch pollinosis.  
van Zuuren EJ, Terreehorst I, Tupker RA, Hiemstra PS, Akkerdaas JH.
Allergy 2010 Mar 5;

Accuracy of a point-of-care testing device in children with suspected respiratory allergy.  
Serratud T, Donnanno S, Terracciano L, Trimarco G, Martelli A, Petersson C, Borres M, Fiocchi A, Cavagni G.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Mar 16;
Click to view abstract

Does avoidance of peanuts in early life reduce the risk of peanut allergy?  
McLean S, Sheikh A.
BMJ 2010;340c424

Should allergic reactions to radio-contrast media be investigated by an allergist?  
Nasser S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar 1;

Longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form in children 0-12 years following positive and negative food challenges.  
Dunngalvin A, Cullinane C, Daly DA, Flokstra-de Blok BM, Dubois AE, Hourihane JO.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar;40(3):476-485
Click to view abstract

The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.  
Scherer K, Harr T, Bach S, Bircher AJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar;40(3):468-475
Click to view abstract

Immediate and dual response to nasal challenge with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in local allergic rhinitis.  
Lopez S, Rondon C, Torres MJ, Campo P, Canto G, Fernandez R, Garcia R, Martinez-Canavate A, Blanca M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar 12;
Click to view abstract

Clinical value of negative skin tests to iodinated contrast media.  
Caimmi S, Benyahia B, Suau D, Bousquet-Rouanet L, Caimmi D, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Mar 12;
Click to view abstract

Occupational immediate-type asthma and rhinitis due to rhodium salts.  
Merget R, Sander I, van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Ulmer HM, Kulzer R, Bruening T.
Am J Ind Med 2010 Jan;53(1):42-46
Click to view abstract

House-dust mite nasal provocation: A diagnostic tool in perennial rhinitis.  
Chusakul S, Phannaso C, Sangsarsri S, Aeumjaturapat S, Snidvongs K.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Mar;24(2):133-136
Click to view abstract

Influence of hyperosmotic conditions on basophil CD203c upregulation in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Wolanczyk-Medrala A, Barg W, Gogolewski G, Panaszek B, Liebhart J, Litwa M, Medrala W.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2009 Dec;16(2):301-304

Oral allergy syndrome: a clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenge.  
Webber CM, England RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):101-108
Click to view abstract

Castor bean, Ricinus communis.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):A4

Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome during delayed pressure urticaria treatment.  
do Valle SO, Franca AT, Pires GV, Guimaraes P, Dias GA, Levy SA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):181-182

A comparison of 4 epinephrine autoinjector delivery systems: usability and patient preference.  
Guerlain S, Hugine A, Wang L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):172-177
Click to view abstract

Effects of summer mailing on in vivo and in vitro relative potencies of standardized timothy grass extract.  
Moore M, Tucker M, Grier T, Quinn J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):147-151
Click to view abstract

Thaumatin-like protein and baker's respiratory allergy.  
Lehto M, Airaksinen L, Puustinen A, Tillander S, Hannula S, Nyman T, Toskala E, Alenius H, Lauerma A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):139-146
Click to view abstract

Pest and allergen exposure and abatement in inner-city asthma: a work group report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Indoor Allergy/Air Pollution Committee.  
Sheehan WJ, Rangsithienchai PA, Wood RA, Rivard D, Chinratanapisit S, Perzanowski MS, Chew GL, Seltzer JM, Matsui EC, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar;125(3):575-581
Click to view abstract

The structure of the dust mite allergen Der p 7 reveals similarities to innate immune proteins.  
Mueller GA, Edwards LL, Aloor JJ, Fessler MB, Glesner J, Pomes A, Chapman MD, London RE, Pedersen LC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 10;
Click to view abstract

Allergen-induced, eotaxin-rich, proangiogenic bone marrow progenitors: A blood-borne cellular envoy for lung eosinophilia.  
Asosingh K, Hanson JD, Cheng G, Aronica MA, Erzurum SC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 12;
Click to view abstract

Risks associated with foods having advisory milk labeling.  
Crotty MP, Taylor SL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 12;

Utility of peanut-specific IgE levels in predicting the outcome of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges.  
van Nieuwaal NH, Lasfar W, Meijer Y, Kentie PA, Flinterman AE, Pasmans SG, Knulst AC, Hoekstra MO.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 19;

Is the detection of IgE to multiple Bet v 1-homologous food allergens by means of allergen microarray clinically useful?  
Villalta D, Asero R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 19;

Risk of severe anaphylaxis for patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy: Are angiotensin-receptor blockers comparable to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors?  
Caviglia AG, Passalacqua G, Senna G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 25;

Increased risk of eczema but reduced risk of early wheezy disorder from exclusive breast-feeding in high-risk infants.  
Giwercman C, Halkjaer LB, Jensen SM, Bonnelykke K, Lauritzen L, Bisgaard H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 15;
Click to view abstract

False positive results can occur on delayed reading of intradermal tests with cisplatin.  
Guyot-Caquelin P, Granel F, Kaminsky MC, Trechot P, Schmutz JL, Barbaud A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 23;

Measurement of IgE antibodies to shrimp tropomyosin is superior to skin prick testing with commercial extract and measurement of IgE to shrimp for predicting clinically relevant allergic reactions after shrimp ingestion.  
Yang AC, Arruda LK, Santos AB, Barbosa MC, Chapman MD, Galvao CE, Kalil J, Morato-Castro FF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 10;
Click to view abstract

Administration of influenza vaccines to patients with egg allergy.  
Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar 10;

Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy.  
Wang J, Lin J, Bardina L, Goldis M, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Shreffler WG, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Mar;125(3):695-702, 702
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Temporary henna tattoos with long-term consequences.  
Almeida PJ, Borrego L.
Med J Aust 2009 Dec 7;191(11-12):687

Indoor allergen exposure, sensitization, and development of asthma in a high-risk birth cohort.  
Carlsten C, mich-Ward H, Becker AB, Ferguson A, Chan HW, Dybuncio A, Chan-Yeung M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar 19;

The effect of a partially hydrolysed formula based on rice protein in the treatment of infants with cow's milk protein allergy.  
Reche M, Pascual C, Fiandor A, Polanco I, Rivero-Urgell M, Chifre R, Johnston S, Martin-Esteban M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar 10;

[Epidemiological characteristics of patients with food allergy assisted at Regional Center of Allergies and Clinical Immunology of Monterrey].  
Rodriguez-Ortiz PG, Munoz-Mendoza D, rias-Cruz A, Gonzalez-Diaz SN, Herrera-Castro D, Vidaurri-Ojeda AC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Nov;56(6):185-191
Click to view abstract

[Prevalence of allergic diseases in Mexico City].  
Lopez PG, Morfin Maciel BM, Huerta LJ, Mejia CF, Lopez LJ, Aguilar G, Rivera Perez JL, Lopez ML, Vargas F.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 May;56(3):72-79
Click to view abstract

[Sensitization to three species of mites in allergic patients from the coastal area of Havana city].  
Almarales RL, Castello MA, Diaz MR, Canosa JS, Gomez IG, Leon MG, Dominguez IE, Rosado AL, Viltre BI, Diaz YO, Morejon MM.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Mar;56(2):31-35
Click to view abstract

[Risk factors of food allergy].  
Hidalgo-Castro EM, del Rio-Navarro BE, Sienra-Monge JJ.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Sep;56(5):158-164
Click to view abstract

[Anesthesiologist's aptitude for peri-operative detection and treatment of latex allergy].  
Cabrera-Pivaral CE, Rangel-Ramirez AA, Franco-Chavez S, Gamez-Nava JI, Riebeling C, Nava A.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Jul;56(4):108-114
Click to view abstract

[Sensitization to mites. Relation with atopic diseases in school children from San Antonio de los Banos].  
Diaz RA, Fabre Ortiz DE, Coutin MG, Gonzales MT.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 May;56(3):80-85
Click to view abstract

[Allergens used in skin tests in Mexico].  
Larenas LD, Arias CA, Guidos Fogelbach GA, Cid del Prado ML.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Mar;56(2):41-47
Click to view abstract

[Sensitization to pollens of Oleaceae family in a group of patients from Mexico City].  
Morfin-Maciel BM, Flores I, Rosas-Alvarado A, Bautista M, Lopez-Lopez JR.
Rev Alerg Mex 2009 Nov;56(6):198-203
Click to view abstract

Comment tester l’allergie de contact à la colle tissulaire au 2-octylcyanoacrylate (Dermabond®) ? / How to test the contact allergy to the tissue adhesive 2-octylcyanoacrylate (Dermabond ®)?  
M. Studer, C. Pouget-Jasson, J. Waton, J.-L. Schmutz, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(2):75-76
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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