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 Allergy Advisor Digest - May 2013
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Levels and predictors of urinary nickel concentrations of children in Germany
Read Identification of novel allergenic components from German cockroach fecal extract by a proteomic approach.
Read Role of staphylococcal superantigens in airway disease.
Read Airborne olive pollen counts are not representative of exposure to the major olive allergen Ole e 1.
Read Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.
Read Utility of penicillin allergy testing in patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy.
Read What's new in the diagnosis and management of food allergy in children?
Read Duck egg allergy in a patient who tolerates hen's eggs.
Read Profile of latex sensitization and allergies in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Read Proteomic and immunological characterization of a new food allergen from hazelnut.
Read Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to Bet v 1.

Abstracts shared in May 2013 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Relationship between treatment with antacid medication and the prevalence of food allergy in children.
Read The age impact on serum total and allergen-specific IgE.
Read Banana hypersensitivity among a group of atopic Egyptian children
Read The clinical usefulness of IgE antibodies against egg white and its components in Korean children.
Read Allergenicity of casein containing chalk in milk allergic schoolchildren.
Read Staphylococcal enterotoxin specific IgE and asthma
Read Cassia cinnamon as a source of coumarin in cinnamon-flavored food and food supplements in the United States.
Read Food allergy to caper (Capparis spinosa).
Read Perphenazine as a cause of mother-to-daughter contact dermatitis and photocontact dermatitis.
Read Tomato allergy: clinical features and usefulness of current routinely available diagnostic methods.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Levels and predictors of urinary nickel concentrations of children in Germany
Human biomonitoring of nickel has gained interest in environmental medicine due to its wide distribution in the environment and its allergenic potential. There are indications that the prevalence of nickel sensitization in children is increased by nickel exposure and that oral uptake of nickel can exacerbate nickel dermatitis in nickel-sensitive individuals. Urinary nickel measurement is a good indicator of exposure. However, data on nickel levels in urine of children are rare. For the first time, the German Environmental Survey on children (GerES IV) 2003-2006 provided representative data to describe the internal nickel exposure of children aged 3-14 years in Germany. Nickel levels (n=1576) ranged from <0.5 to 15 µg/l. Analysis showed that gender, age, socio-economic status, being overweight, consumption of hazelnut spread, nuts, cereals, chocolate and urinary creatinine were significant predictors for urinary nickel excretion of children who do not smoke. (Wilhelm 2013 ref.28933 3)

Levels and predictors of urinary nickel concentrations of children in Germany: results from the German Environmental Survey on children (GerES IV).  
Wilhelm M, Wittsiepe J, Seiwert M, Hünken A, Becker K, Conrad A, Schulz C, Kolossa-Gehring M.
Int J Hyg Environ Health 2013 Mar;216(2):163-9.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of novel allergenic components from German cockroach fecal extract by a proteomic approach.
This study analyzed the allergenic components from German cockroach feces. IgE-reactive proteins were analyzed by proteomic analysis and immunoblotting. Recombinant alpha-amylase was produced and its allergenicity was evaluated by ELISA. 12 IgE-reactive components were identified. Most of these allergens were found to be digestive enzymes such as alpha-amylase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, metalloprotease, and midgut carboxypeptidase A, but the identity of 3 IgE-reactive proteins is still unknown. Glycinin-like proteins, which were likely derived from the cockroach diet, were also identified. German cockroach alpha-amylase shares the highest identity with pig alpha-amylase (55.8%), followed by mite group 4 allergens (Blo t 4, 50.4%; Der p 4, 49.8%; Eur m 4, 47.4%). Recombinant alpha-amylase from German cockroach was expressed, and its allergenicity was examined by ELISA. Specific IgE against recombinant amylase was detected in 41.4% (12/29) of serum samples from German cockroach-sensitized subjects. Recombinant alpha-amylase was able to inhibit 55% of specific IgE to German cockroach whole-body extract. Amylase was therefore found to be an important novel allergen in cockroach feces.

Identification of novel allergenic components from German cockroach fecal extract by a proteomic approach.  
Jeong KY, Kim CR, Park J, Han IS, Park JW, Yong TS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):315-324

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Role of staphylococcal superantigens in airway disease.
Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen, which is regularly part of the normal microflora found in the nose and skin. It represents a significant threat to human health, not in the least because of its capability to produce exotoxins, which have superantigenic properties. These exotoxins, in particular the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs), are known to be involved in the modulation and aggravation of airway inflammation. Indeed, recent studies show an important impact of SEs on the natural course of allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis, asthma and COPD. This review outlines the current knowledge on the influence of SEs on airway inflammation. We highlight, in particular, the recent evidence on their role in asthma

Role of staphylococcal superantigens in airway disease.  
Huvenne W, Hellings PW, Bachert C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):304-314

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Airborne olive pollen counts are not representative of exposure to the major olive allergen Ole e 1.
Yearly olive pollen counts in Cordoba were 2.4 times higher than in Evora, but Ole e 1 concentrations were 7.6 times higher. When modeling the origin of the pollen, >40% of Ole e 1 exposure in Evora was explained by high-potency pollen originating from the south of Spain. Thus, olive pollen can vary substantially in allergen release, even though they are morphologically identical

Airborne olive pollen counts are not representative of exposure to the major olive allergen Ole e 1.  
Galan C, Antunes C, Brandao R, Torres C, Garcia-Mozo H, Caeiro E, Ferro R, Prank M, Sofiev M, Albertini R, Berger U, Cecchi L, Celenk S, Grewling L, Jackowiak B, Jager S, Kennedy R, Rantio-Leh.
Allergy 2013 Jun;68(6):809-812

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.
Allergic skin tests have to be performed 4-6 weeks after an allergic anesthetic reaction. Patients with allergic reactions during anesthesia were prospectively included (n = 44). Skin tests were performed in two stages: (i) Stage 1 (S1), 0-4 days after the reaction; and (ii) Stage 2 (S2), 4-8 weeks after. Five (11.5%) surgical procedures were suspended due to the reaction. Positive skin tests were obtained in 25/44 patients (57%). Allergic diagnosis was carried out at S1 in 15/25 (60%) and at S2 in 10/25 (40%). Three patients resulted positive only in S1. Overall agreement among S1 and S2 skin tests was 70.45%. The kappa statistic was 0.41 (P-value = 0.002). Odds ratio of obtaining a false negative in S1 (compared with S2) was 3.33. Early allergological study is useful, could minimize false negatives, but should be considered as a complement to late skin tests

Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.  
Lafuente A, Javaloyes G, Berroa F, Goikoetxea MJ, Moncada R, Nunez-Cordoba JM, Cabrera-Freitag P, D'Amelio C, Sanz ML, Gastaminza G.
Allergy 2013 Jun;68(6):820-822

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Utility of penicillin allergy testing in patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy.
A minority of patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy have evidence of immune-mediated hypersensitivity (17/110, 15%) in this study. Of these, eight out of seventeen (47%) had delayed reactions, demonstrating the usefulness and discriminating power of objective testing, which must include three-day oral challenge. Discriminating factors for immune-mediated allergy from patient history were a clear description of the original reaction and a history of anaphylaxis. Negative allergy testing enables the use of penicillin as first-line treatment when necessary and this can significantly reduce costs of antibiotics.

Utility of penicillin allergy testing in patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy.  
Sagar PS, Katelaris CH.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):115-119

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What's new in the diagnosis and management of food allergy in children?
This article reviews the recent advances in the diagnosis and management of IgE mediated food allergy in children. It will encompass the emerging technology of component testing; moves to standardization of the allergy food challenge; permissive diets which allow for inclusion of extensively heated food allergens with allergen avoidance; and strategies for accelerating tolerance and food desensitization including the use of adjuvants for specific tolerance induction.

What's new in the diagnosis and management of food allergy in children?  
Turner PJ, Campbell DE.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):88-95

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Duck egg allergy in a patient who tolerates hen's eggs.
People with allergy to hen’s eggs are generally also allergic to eggs from other birds, such as geese or duck. But it is possible to be allergic to one type of egg but not to others. A 69-year-old man presented with complaints of erythematous itchy papular rash in the perioral area accompanied by swelling of the lips in the area that had been in contact with duck egg. The reaction appeared 20 minutes after eating duck egg white. The patient also presented breathlessness, wheezing, and skin lesions on his body. He experienced symptoms every time he tried duck egg. Ingestion of hen’s eggs did not induce any symptoms. Skin tests were positive to grass pollen and weeds and hen’s egg proteins, and negative to egg white, egg yolk, ovalbumin (OVA) and ovomucoid. Prick-to-prick tests with fresh uncooked duck egg white and yolk were positive. A double-blind placebo-controlled oral food challenge with duck egg white caused oral pruritus and urticaria after 50 minutes. Immunoblotting showed a band of specific IgE protein with a molecular weight of around 14.4 kDa that might correspond to lysozyme (gal d 4).

Duck egg allergy in a patient who tolerates hen's eggs.  
Fernandez CS, Fernandez GA, Armentia MA, Pineda F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):135-136

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Profile of latex sensitization and allergies in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
This study evaluated the frequency of sensitization and allergy to latex in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The study included 55 children and adolescents with myelomeningocele followed at a specialized center. A prevalence of 25% for latex sensitization and of 20% for latex allergy was shown. Twenty-four patients (43.6%) were atopic and the average age for the first reaction to latex was 44.5 months. Cutaneous reactions were the most frequently reported reactions (72.7%). Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E to rHev b 1, rHev b 3, rHev b 5, rHev b 6.1, and rHev b 6.2 was detected in over 50% of patients allergic to latex.

Profile of latex sensitization and allergies in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
Bueno de SA, Camilo Araujo RF, Cavalheiro S, Carvalho MM, Sole D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):43-49

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Proteomic and immunological characterization of a new food allergen from hazelnut.
This study investigated the IgE-reactivity pattern of children with hazelnut allergy (N=15) from Regione Campania, Southern Italy, and addressed proteomic strategies for characterizing IgE-binding proteins. The predominant (15/15) IgE-reactive component was a minor ~55kDa protein not previously described. Similar to the hazelnut 11S globulin Cor a 9 allergen, the immunoreactive protein consisted of two subunits linked via a disulfide bridge. In contrast to Cor a 9, only the 20.7kDa alkaline subunit exhibited IgE-affinity. Peptide mass fingerprinting was unsuccessful in identifying it, due to the incompleteness of the annotated hazelnut genome. Several tryptic peptides were de novo sequenced showed a high degree of homology with the 11S globulin storage proteins from other seeds, some of which have already been reported as food allergens. The structural characterization suggests that the new putative allergen is a divergent isoform of the hazelnut 11S globulin. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Over the years, at least five proteins have been reported as potential food hazelnut allergens. The predominance of specific allergens appears to be strictly related to the geographical origin of the allergic subjects. The complex patterns of the IgE-reactivity of hazelnut storage proteins result in a poor diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. In the perspective of a component-resolved "molecular approach" to the hazelnut allergy the authors investigated the immune-reactivity patterns to hazelnuts of 15 patients (14 in the pediatric age range) The putative allergen appears to be an isoallergen of the hazelnut 11S globulin Cor a 9. Like this latter, the immunoreactive protein consisted of two subunits linked via a disulfide. In contrast to Cor a 9, only the 20.7kDa alkaline subunit exhibited IgE-affinity, in analogy to 11S allergens from other seeds (pistachio, cashew, soybean). (Nitride 2013 ref.28926 7)

Proteomic and immunological characterization of a new food allergen from hazelnut (Corylus avellana).  
Nitride C, Mamone G, Picariello G, Mills C, Nocerino R, Canani RB, Ferranti P.
Miscellaneous 592 2013 May 9.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to Bet v 1.
Patients with pollen allergy may frequently present an additional food-related allergy (Oral Allergic Syndrome, OAS), as consequence of cross-reactivity between pollen allergens (mainly birch, hazelnut, alder, mugwort) and vegetable allergens. This study evaluated the effect on Bet v 1-induced T cell proliferation exerted by the presence of OAS in birch patients. All 14 allergic patients evaluated were monosensitized to birch and suffered from allergic rhinitis: 4 had also OAS to apple. Proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells was evaluated using Bet v 1 and non-specific stimuli. OAS had higher proliferation than non-OAS patients. In addition, there were significant relationships between immunological and clinical parameters in OAS patients. This study evidences that OAS characterizes a more severe form of birch allergy: as OAS patients had higher SI, circulating eosinophils, and IgE levels. Thus, this study confirms the previous report and underlines the relevance of measuring recombinant birch allergen as higher values may suggest a reliable prediction of OAS. (Ciprandi 2012 ref.28928 5)

Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to Bet v 1.  
Ciprandi G, Fenoglio G, Kalli F, De Amici M, Leonardi S, Miraglia Del Giudice M, Salpietro C, La Rosa M, Caimmi S, Marseglia GL.
Miscellaneous 592 2012 Jan-Mar;26(1 Suppl):S113-7.

Abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Levels and predictors of urinary nickel concentrations of children in Germany: results from the German Environmental Survey on children (GerES IV).  
Wilhelm M, Wittsiepe J, Seiwert M, Hünken A, Becker K, Conrad A, Schulz C, Kolossa-Gehring M.
Int J Hyg Environ Health 2013 Mar;216(2):163-9.
Abstract

Identification of novel allergenic components from German cockroach fecal extract by a proteomic approach.  
Jeong KY, Kim CR, Park J, Han IS, Park JW, Yong TS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):315-324
Click to view abstract

Role of staphylococcal superantigens in airway disease.  
Huvenne W, Hellings PW, Bachert C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):304-314
Click to view abstract

Every cockroach is beautiful to its mother.  
Arruda LK, Pomes A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):289-292

Clinical routine utility of basophil activation testing for diagnosis of hymenoptera-allergic patients with emphasis on individuals with negative venom-specific IgE antibodies.  
Korosec P, Silar M, Erzen R, Celesnik N, Bajrovic N, Zidarn M, Kosnik M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 May 14;161(4):363-368
Click to view abstract

Airborne olive pollen counts are not representative of exposure to the major olive allergen Ole e 1.  
Galan C, Antunes C, Brandao R, Torres C, Garcia-Mozo H, Caeiro E, Ferro R, Prank M, Sofiev M, Albertini R, Berger U, Cecchi L, Celenk S, Grewling L, Jackowiak B, Jager S, Kennedy R, Rantio-Leh.
Allergy 2013 Jun;68(6):809-812
Click to view abstract

Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.  
Lafuente A, Javaloyes G, Berroa F, Goikoetxea MJ, Moncada R, Nunez-Cordoba JM, Cabrera-Freitag P, D'Amelio C, Sanz ML, Gastaminza G.
Allergy 2013 Jun;68(6):820-822
Click to view abstract

Characteristics of anaphylaxis in children referred to a tertiary care center.  
Vezir E, Erkocoglu M, Kaya A, Toyran M, Ozcan C, Akan A, Azkur D, Ginis T, Civelek E, Kocabas CN.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2013 May;34(3):239-246
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis in infancy compared with older children.  
Topal E, Bakirtas A, Yilmaz O, Ertoy K, Arga M, Demirsoy MS, Turktas I.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2013 May;34(3):233-238
Click to view abstract

Relationship between treatment with antacid medication and the prevalence of food allergy in children.  
Demuth K, Stecenko A, Sullivan K, Fitzpatrick A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2013 May;34(3):227-232
Click to view abstract

Biphasic reactions in children undergoing oral food challenges.  
Lee J, Garrett JP, Brown-Whitehorn T, Spergel JM.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2013 May;34(3):220-226
Click to view abstract

The Age Impact on Serum Total and Allergen-Specific IgE.  
De Amici M, Ciprandi G.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):170-174
Click to view abstract

Assessment of Total/Specific IgE Levels Against 7 Inhalant Allergens in Children Aged 3 to 6 Years in Seoul, Korea.  
Kim EJ, Kwon JW, Lim YM, Yoon D, Seo JH, Chang WS, Kim HY, Park JW, Cho SH, Hong SJ, Lee JS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):162-169
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of banana hypersensitivity among a group of atopic Egyptian children: relation to parental/self reports.  
El-Sayed ZA, El-Ghoneimy DH, El-Shennawy D, Nasser MW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):150-154
Click to view abstract

The clinical usefulness of IgE antibodies against egg white and its components in Korean children.  
Min TK, Jeon YH, Yang HJ, Pyun BY.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):138-142
Click to view abstract

Management of insect sting hypersensitivity: an update.  
Pesek RD, Lockey RF.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 May;5(3):129-137
Click to view abstract

Experiencing a first food allergic reaction: a survey of parent and caregiver perspectives.  
Abdurrahman ZB, Kastner M, Wurman C, Harada L, Bantock L, Cruickshank H, Waserman S.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2013 May 29;9(1):18
Click to view abstract

Allergen of the month-Chinese juniper.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):A27

Protein contact dermatitis and food allergy to mare milk.  
Doyen V, Leduc V, Corazza F, Mairesse M, Ledent C, Michel O.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):390-391

Food sensitization in Japanese infants is associated with a common Filaggrin variant.  
Nomura T, Tsuge I, Inuo C, Nakajima Y, Kondo Y, Sugiura S, Murata H, Iguchi T, Terada A, Saitoh S, Hashimoto S, Urisu A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):388-390

A comparison of subject room dust with home vacuum dust for evaluation of dust-borne aeroallergens.  
Barnes C, Portnoy JM, Ciaccio CE, Pacheco F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):375-379
Click to view abstract

The epidemiology of milk allergy in US children.  
Warren CM, Jhaveri S, Warrier MR, Smith B, Gupta RS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):370-374
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of casein containing chalk in milk allergic schoolchildren.  
Larramendi CH, Marco FM, Llombart M, de l, Chiner E, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Sempere JM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 May;110(5):335-339
Click to view abstract

Lack of association between passive smoking and asthma prevalence in Mexican children.  
Bedolla-Barajas M, Morales-Romero J.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):141-142

Passive smoking could still represent a risk factor in Mexican children with asthma.  
Pichilingue AP, Ono JQ.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):140

Staphylococcal enterotoxin specific IgE and asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Song WJ, Jo EJ, Lee JW, Kang HR, Cho SH, Min KU, Chang YS.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):120-126
Click to view abstract

Utility of penicillin allergy testing in patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy.  
Sagar PS, Katelaris CH.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):115-119
Click to view abstract

Clinical evaluation of pediatric anaphylaxis and the necessity for multiple doses of epinephrine.  
Inoue N, Yamamoto A.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):106-114
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of latex allergy in spina bifida patients in Singapore.  
Chua X, Mohamed J, van Bever HP.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):96-99
Click to view abstract

What's new in the diagnosis and management of food allergy in children?  
Turner PJ, Campbell DE.
Asia Pac Allergy 2013 Apr;3(2):88-95
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: analysis of the factors involved.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Ariza A, Dona I, Mayorga C, Montanez MI, Garcia-Campos J, Gomez F, Rondon C, Blanca M, Torres MJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 May;43(5):560-567
Click to view abstract

Prenatal smoke exposure, DNA methylation, and childhood atopic dermatitis.  
Wang IJ, Chen SL, Lu TP, Chuang EY, Chen PC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 May;43(5):535-543
Click to view abstract

Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.  
Owen KP, Sutter ME, Albertson TE.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 May 29;
Click to view abstract

Non-cigarette tobacco and the lung.  
Schivo M, Avdalovic MV, Murin S.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 May 15;
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnosis in pediatric allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.  
Melioli G, Passalacqua G, Canonica GW, Baena-Cagnani CE, Matricardi P.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 22;
Click to view abstract

Cardiovascular prophylaxis and aspirin 'allergy'.  
Woessner KM, Simon RA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):263-274
Click to view abstract

Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Caballero-Fonseca F, Capriles-Hulett A.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):251-262
Click to view abstract

NSAID Single-Drug-Induced Reactions.  
Woessner KM, Castells M.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):237-249
Click to view abstract

Pathogenesis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and reactions.  
Laidlaw TM, Boyce JA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):195-210
Click to view abstract

Genetics of Hypersensitivity to Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.  
Kim SH, Sanak M, Park HS.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):177-194
Click to view abstract

Rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Mullol J, Picado C.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):163-176
Click to view abstract

Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: clinical disease and diagnosis.  
Bochenek G, Nizankowska-Mogilnicka E.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):147-161
Click to view abstract

Classification of reactions to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.  
Kowalski ML, Stevenson DD.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2013 May;33(2):135-145
Click to view abstract

Cassia cinnamon as a source of coumarin in cinnamon-flavored food and food supplements in the United States.  
Wang YH, Avula B, Nanayakkara NP, Zhao J, Khan IA.
J Agric Food Chem

Pet exposure and risk of atopic dermatitis at the pediatric age: A meta-analysis of birth cohort studies.  
Pelucchi C, Galeone C, Bach JF, La VC, Chatenoud L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 24;
Click to view abstract

Filaggrin gene mutation associations with peanut allergy persist despite variations in peanut allergy diagnostic criteria or asthma status.  
Asai Y, Greenwood C, Hull PR, Alizadehfar R, Ben-Shoshan M, Brown SJ, Campbell L, Michel DL, Bussieres J, Rousseau F, Fujiwara TM, Morgan K, Irvine AD, McLean WH, Clarke A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 16;

Crystal structure and immunologic characterization of the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 4.  
Zafred D, Nandy A, Pump L, Kahlert H, Keller W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 14;
Click to view abstract

Development of a validated blood test for nickel sensitization.  
Pacheco K, Barker L, Maier L, Erb S, Sills M, Knight V.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 11;

Serum tryptase determination in patients with acute allergic reactions.  
Vitte J, Bongrand P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May 2;

French application of the European guidelines for regulation of allergenic extracts.  
de Blay F, Doyen V, Bloch-Morot E, Caillot D, Gayraud J, de Laval A, Thillay A; APSI group.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 May;131(5):1435-1437

Duck egg allergy in a patient who tolerates hen's eggs.  
Fernandez CS, Fernandez GA, Armentia MA, Pineda F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):135-136

Profilin may be a primary airborne sensitizer: a case report.  
Asero R, Villalta D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):134-135

Fixed drug eruption caused by piperacillin-tazobactam.  
Santosa A, Teo BW, Shek LP.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):132-133

Usefulness of oral food challenge and a visual analog scale in the etiologic diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Valbuena T, Fiandor A, Quirce S, Lucendo AJ, Caballero T.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):131-132

Nonadverse effects on allergenicity of isopentenyltransferase-transformed broccoli.  
Liao EC, Chen JT, Chao ML, Yu SC, Chang CY, Chu WS, Tsai JJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(2):112-119
Click to view abstract

Cypress-sensitized asymptomatic patients during the pollen season: sensitization or simply cross-reactivity?  
Sposato B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):74-75

Early diagnosis of an allergic reaction to cisatracurium.  
Goikoetxea MJ, Lafuente A, de la Borbolla JM, Moncada R, Sanz ML, Gastaminza G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):69-71

Food allergy to caper (Capparis spinosa).  
Alcantara M, Morales M, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):67-69

Perphenazine as a cause of mother-to-daughter contact dermatitis and photocontact dermatitis.  
Gacias L, Linares T, Escudero E, Soto-Mera MT, Abalde MT.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):60-61

Has sensitization to cockroach allergens changed during the last 17 years in the urban atopic population living in Naples (Southern Italy)?  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Piccolo A, Russo M, D'Amato M, Stanziola A, Bovenzi D, D'Amato G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):57-59

Allergen stimulation induces simultaneous production of type 2 helper T cells and regulatory cytokines in patients with pollen allergy.  
Urra JM, Feo BF, Carrasco P, De la RF, Zamorano J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):54-55

Profile of latex sensitization and allergies in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
Bueno de SA, Camilo Araujo RF, Cavalheiro S, Carvalho MM, Sole D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):43-49
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Tomato allergy: clinical features and usefulness of current routinely available diagnostic methods.  
Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):37-42
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Serum tryptase concentrations in beekeepers with and without Hymenoptera venom allergy.  
Carballada F, Alonso M, Vizcaino L, Coutinho V, Nunez R, Vidal C, Boquete M, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):30-36
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Immune responses to Tyrophagus putrescentiae-induced airway inflammation in mice.  
Liao EC, Ho CM, Yin SC, Tsai JJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(1):20-29
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Proteomic and immunological characterization of a new food allergen from hazelnut (Corylus avellana).  
Nitride C, Mamone G, Picariello G, Mills C, Nocerino R, Canani RB, Ferranti P.
Miscellaneous 592 2013 May 9.
Abstract

Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to Bet v 1.  
Ciprandi G, Fenoglio G, Kalli F, De Amici M, Leonardi S, Miraglia Del Giudice M, Salpietro C, La Rosa M, Caimmi S, Marseglia GL.
Miscellaneous 592 2012 Jan-Mar;26(1 Suppl):S113-7.
Abstract

Validation of the Paediatric Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire (PFA-QL).  
Knibb RC, Ibrahim NF, Petley R, Cummings AJ, King RM, Roberts G, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Lucas JS.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):288-292
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New validated recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled low-dose food challenges.  
Winberg A, Nordstrom L, Strinnholm A, Nylander A, Jonsall A, Ronmark E, West CE.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 May;24(3):282-287
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