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 Allergy Advisor Digest - November 2014
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the November 2014 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Occupational anaphylaxis - An EAACI task force consensus statement.
Read Green areas around homes reduce atopic sensitization in children.
Read Food hypersensitivity in Mexican adults at 18 to 50 years of age: a questionnaire survey.
Read Immunoglobulin E-antibodies to atracurium: a new diagnostic tool?
Read p-Phenylenediamine and other allergens in hair dye products in the United States: a consumer exposure study
Read Contact and photocontact allergy to octocrylene
Read Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.
Read Benzophenones.
Read Diagnosis and prevalence of lanolin allergy.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis of the vulva.
Read American contact dermatitis society core allergen series.
Read Contact allergy to sorbitans: a follow-up study.
Read The role of contact allergens in chronic idiopathic urticaria.
Read Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.
Read Changing patterns of antigen exposure and their impact on the prevalence of allergy.
Read The inflammatory effect of the crude extract of Phaenopsectra flavipes Northeast Algeria, in a mouse model

Snippets posted in the November 2014 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read New risks from ancient food dyes: cochineal red allergy.
Read Unusual sensitization to parvalbumins from certain fish species.
Read Allergy reaction mediated by Gal d 4 (lysozyme) after the induction of tolerance with egg.
Read Systemic reactions to honeybee stings and nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs.
Read Hypersensitivity to pollen of four different species of Brassica: a clinico-immunologic evaluation in patients of respiratory allergy in India.
Read Occupational airborne contact dermatitis from benzodiazepines and other drugs.
Read Goat's cheese anaphylaxis after cutaneous sensitization by moisturizer that contained goat's milk.
Read Determination of the clinical egg allergy phenotypes using component-resolved diagnostics.
Read Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 sensitization predict peanut allergy in Mediterranean pediatric patients.
Read Hypersensitivity allergic to foods in the irritable bowel syndrome

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational anaphylaxis - An EAACI task force consensus statement.
Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction, potentially life-threatening that can be due to non-occupational or, less commonly, to occupational triggers. Occupational anaphylaxis could be defined as anaphylaxis arising out of triggers and conditions attributable to a particular work environment. Hymenoptera stings and natural rubber latex are the commonest triggers of occupational anaphylaxis. Other triggers include food, medications, insect/mammal/snake bites and chemicals. The underlying mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions due to occupational exposure are usually IgE-mediated and less frequently non-IgE-mediated allergy or non-allergic. Some aspects of work-related allergen exposure, such as route and frequency of exposure, type of allergens and cofactors may explain the variability of symptoms in contrast to the non-occupational setting. When assessing occupational anaphylaxis both confirmation of the diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction and also identification of the trigger are required. Prevention of further episodes is important and is based on removal from further exposure. Workers with a history of occupational anaphylaxis should immediately be provided with a written emergency management plan, an adrenaline auto-injector and educated to its use. Immunotherapy is recommended only for occupational anaphylaxis due to Hymenoptera stings.

Occupational anaphylaxis - An EAACI task force consensus statement.  
Siracusa A, Folletti I, Gerth van WR, Jeebhay M, Moscato G, Quirce S, Raulf M, Rueff F, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Whitaker P, Tarlo S.
Allergy 2014 Nov 5;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Green areas around homes reduce atopic sensitization in children.
The amount of green environment (forest and agricultural land) around home was inversely associated with the risk of atopic sensitization in children. The results indicate that early life exposure to green environments is especially important. The environmental effect may be mediated via the effect of environmental microbiota on the commensal microbiota influencing immunotolerance.

Green areas around homes reduce atopic sensitization in children.  
Ruokolainen L, von HL, Fyhrquist N, Laatikainen T, Lehtomaki J, Auvinen P, Karvonen A, Hyvarinen AM, Tillmann V, Niemela O, Knip M, Haahtela T, Pekkanen J, Hanski I.
Allergy 2014 Nov 11;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food hypersensitivity in Mexican adults at 18 to 50 years of age: a questionnaire survey.
This studyaimed to determine the prevalence of food hypersensitivity in Mexican adults, their clinical features and to establish common food involved in its appearance. 1,126 subjects answered a structured survey to gather information related to FH. Oas, urticaria and anaphylaxis symptoms were reported for shrimp, peach, avocado, apple, kiwi, peanut, coconut, strawberry, honey, tequila, mushroom, walnut, fish, garlic, onion, cherry, chocolate, mango, melon, papaya, pork, clam, milk, lentil, snail, beer, peach, lemon, pepper, banana, beetroot, rabbit, sesame, crab, guava and linseed.

Food hypersensitivity in Mexican adults at 18 to 50 years of age: a questionnaire survey.  
Bedolla-Barajas M, Bedolla-Pulido TR, Camacho-Pena AS, Gonzalez-Garcia E, Morales-Romero J.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Nov;6(6):511-516

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunoglobulin E-antibodies to atracurium: a new diagnostic tool?
Correct diagnosis of atracurium allergy is not straightforward because drug-specific skin tests and measurement of specific IgE (sIgE)-antibodies against tertiary and quaternary substituted ammonium ions do not demonstrate an absolute predictive value. Recently a solid phase prepared from tetrahydropapaverine, modified with b-propiolactone, and conjugated to poly-L-lysine was developed to detect serum IgE-antibodies to atracurium. However, before acceptance into routine diagnostic practice, this assay requires validation.

Immunoglobulin E-antibodies to atracurium: a new diagnostic tool?  
Uyttebroek A, Sabato V, Bridts C, De CL, Ebo D.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Nov 6;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
p-Phenylenediamine and other allergens in hair dye products in the United States: a consumer exposure study
Hair dye products constitute an important source of allergen exposure, and contribute importantly to allergic contact dermatitis in consumers and hairdressers. This study evaluated the presence of potent contact sensitizers in oxidative hair dye products intended for home use on the US market. Ingredient labels of 107 hair dyes from 10 major brands were examined and used to assess the prevalence of hair dye substances known to be potent contact sensitizers. One hundred and six of 107 (99%) products contained at least one potent sensitizer, and the average product contained six (range 0-11). p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) was found in 83 products (78%), but resorcinol (89%), m-aminophenol (75%), p-aminophenol (60%) and toluene-2,5-diamine (21%) were also frequently identified.

p-Phenylenediamine and other allergens in hair dye products in the United States: a consumer exposure study.  
Hamann D, Yazar K, Hamann CR, Thyssen JP, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):213-218

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact and photocontact allergy to octocrylene
Octocrylene is an ultraviolet (UV)B and UVAII absorber that was introduced some 15 years ago, and is now widely used in sunscreen agents and skin care cosmetics. Since 2003, several studies, notably from France, Belgium, Spain, and Italy, have reported an increasing number of patients with photocontact allergy to octocrylene. This reaction is seen mainly in adult patients who have previously used topical products containing the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen. Photosensitization to ketoprofen leads, in many cases, to photocontact allergy to octocrylene; the mechanism of this reaction is unknown.

Contact and photocontact allergy to octocrylene: a review.  
de Groot AC, Roberts DW.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):193-204

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.
Penicillin is the most common beta-lactam antibiotic allergy and the most common drug class allergy, reported in about 8% of individuals using health care in the USA. Only about 1% of individuals using health care in the USA have a cephalosporin allergy noted in their medical record, and other specific non-penicillin, non-cephalosporin beta-lactam allergies are even rarer. Most reported penicillin allergy is not associated with clinically significant IgE-mediated reactions after penicillin rechallenge. Un-verified penicillin allergy is a significant and growing public health problem. Clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy can be safely confirmed or refuted using skin testing with penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G and, if skin test is negative, an oral amoxicillin challenge. Acute tolerance of an oral therapeutic dose of a penicillin class antibiotic is the current gold standard test for a lack of clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy. Cephalosporins and other non-penicillin beta-lactams are widely, safely, and appropriately used in individuals, even with confirmed penicillin allergy. There is little, if any, clinically significant immunologic cross-reactivity between penicillins and other beta-lactams. Routine cephalosporin skin testing should be restricted to research settings. It is rarely needed clinically to safely manage patients and has unclear predictive value at this time. The use of alternative cephalosporins, with different side chains, is acceptable in the setting of a specific cephalosporin allergy. Carbapenems and monobactams are also safely used in individuals with confirmed penicillin allergy. A certain predictable, but low, rate of adverse reactions will occur with all beta-lactam antibiotic use both pre- and post-beta-lactam allergy evaluations

Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.  
Macy E.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Nov;14(11):476

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Benzophenones.
Benzophenones are ultraviolet light filters that have been documented to cause a myriad of adverse cutaneous reactions, including contact and photocontact dermatitis, contact and photocontact urticaria, and anaphylaxis. In recent years, they have become particularly well known for their ability to induce allergy and photoallergy. Topical sunscreens and other cosmetics are the sources of these allergens in most patients, but reports of reactions secondary to use of industrial products also exist. Benzophenones as a group have been named the American Contact Dermatitis Society's Allergen of the Year for 2014 to raise awareness of both allergy and photoallergy to these ubiquitous agents

Benzophenones.  
Heurung AR, Raju SI, Warshaw EM.
Dermatitis 2014 Jan;25(1):3-10

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnosis and prevalence of lanolin allergy.
Current evaluation of suspected allergic contact dermatitis to lanolin includes patch testing to lanolin alcohol (30% in petrolatum). Using this method, the prevalence of lanolin allergy is low (1.8%-2.5%). The objective of this study was to determine whether patch testing to a single lanolin derivative results in underdiagnosis compared with patch testing to 12 lanolin derivatives. Patients were prospectively patch tested to (1) lanolin alcohol (30% in petrolatum) in our standard allergen series; (2) Amerchol L101 (50% in petrolatum) in our cosmetic series; and (3) 10 lanolin derivatives (using concentrations and vehicles recommended in the literature) in a supplemental series. Of 286 patients, the overall prevalence of positive reactions to lanolin in at least 1 of the 3 patch test series was 6.29% (n = 18). The prevalence rates of lanolin allergy using the standard, cosmetic, and supplemental series were 1.05%, and 3.85%, respectively. Amerchol L101 was associated with increased reaction rates compared with the standard and supplemental series, whereas reaction rates were similar for the standard and supplemental series. Therefore Amerchol L101 and patients' own products should be added to a standard patch testing allergen series to adequately identify lanolin allergy.

Diagnosis and prevalence of lanolin allergy.  
Miest RY, Yiannias JA, Chang YH, Singh N.
Dermatitis 2013 May;24(3):119-123

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis of the vulva.
Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) of the vulva arises as a primary condition or develops secondary to topical agents. Using a database of the patch testing results from 3 geographically distinct sites, patients were identified tested to a gynecologic series between 2003 and 2010. Ninety patients were included. Thirty-five (39%) had a relevant positive result. The 5 allergens with the highest number of cases with a relevant reaction were natural fragrance mix 2%, balsam of Peru, benzocaine 5%, fragrance mix 8%, and quaternium 15 1%. The most common gynecologic series allergen to cause a relevant reaction was terconazole.

Allergic contact dermatitis of the vulva.  
O'Gorman SM, Torgerson RR.
Dermatitis 2013 Mar;24(2):64-72

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
American contact dermatitis society core allergen series.
Evidence for the effectiveness of patch testing and the need for an expanded series that provides experience and evidence-based suggestions for an extended patch testing series are examined in this review. Many of those testing with shorter allergen series are interested in expanding the spectrum of patch testing. The American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) Core Allergen Series Group has arranged a group of suggested allergen groups that can be logically scaled up or down depending on the needs of the patch tester and the community being tested. This is not an 'ACDS 80 Standard.' We suggest a core group of allergens similar to the TRUE Test (SmartPractice, Phoenix, Ariz) with subsequent trays providing a greater breadth of coverage in a logical fashion, with more likely allergens being higher in the tray. For more extensive testing, specialty trays (ie, cosmetics, metals, plant, etc) are recommended

American contact dermatitis society core allergen series.  
Schalock PC, Dunnick CA, Nedorost S, Brod B, Warshaw E, Mowad C.
Dermatitis 2013 Jan;24(1):7-9

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to sorbitans: a follow-up study.
Sorbitan sesquioleate (SSO), an emulsifier in many corticosteroids, was previously found positive in 8.9% of 112 dermatitis patients. The objective of this study was to present data on 24 of 591 dermatitis patients with reactions to SSO and/or sorbitan monooleate (SMO) on patch testing. Of the 591 patients tested, 24 reacted to SSO and/or SMO (4.1%), 19 (3.2%) reacted to SSO alone, 1 (0.17%) to SMO alone, and 4 (0.68%) reacted to both. Of the 24 sorbitan-allergic patients, 2 (8.3%) reacted to any of 4 corticosteroid screening chemicals tested.

Contact allergy to sorbitans: a follow-up study.  
Cressey BD, Kumar N, Scheinman PL.
Dermatitis 2012 Jul;23(4):158-161

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The role of contact allergens in chronic idiopathic urticaria.
The objective of this study was to determine whether contact allergens play a role in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). A longitudinal prospective study of 23 patients with CIU was conducted. Twenty-one of 23 patients were female. The mean age was 46 years. The mean duration of urticaria was 32 months. Of the 23 patients, 8 (35%) experienced improvement of their symptoms with allergen avoidance. Four (17%) experienced a complete remission, and 4 (17%) experienced partial improvement. Two of the complete responders challenged themselves to proven contact allergens and developed urticaria, which resolved upon allergen avoidance. The most common allergens were potassium dichromate (n = 9), nickel sulfate (n = 7), Myroxylon pereirae (n = 6), cobalt chloride, neomycin, p-phenylenediamine (n = 5); fragrance mix I, fragrance mix II (n = 4); cinnamic aldehyde (n = 3); and formaldehyde (n = 2).

The role of contact allergens in chronic idiopathic urticaria.  
Hession MT, Scheinman PL.
Dermatitis 2012 May;23(3):110-116

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.
Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways.

Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.  
Szebeni J.
Mol Immunol 2014 Oct;61(2):163-173

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Changing patterns of antigen exposure and their impact on the prevalence of allergy.
Industrial development has advanced at a varying pace in different parts of the world over the past two hundred years. Inhabitants of the most industrially advanced regions have experienced major changes in patterns of antigen exposure to infectious agents and to environmental biological substances. This article analyzes the major factors that affect the amounts and variety of antigens to which the immune system of a young child is exposed. Depending on individual living environments and lifestyles, the types of antigen exposure of young children are graded into five patterns: "primitive", "pre-modern", "early-modern", "modern" and "ultra-modern". These patterns represent increasing deviation from the pattern of human immune system exposure to antigens prior to the industrial revolution. This article further discusses how such changes in antigen exposure have affected the immunological system, especially with regard to the development of total IgE and allergic response-relevant antigen-specific IgE, and how the patterns of antigen exposure are related to the propensity to develop allergy.

Changing patterns of antigen exposure and their impact on the prevalence of allergy.  
Chang TW.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The inflammatory effect of the crude extract of Phaenopsectra flavipes Northeast Algeria, in a mouse model
Chironomidae are insects that inhabit the wetlands. In Algeria, this hypersensitivity has not yet been clarified although this country is rich in wetlands of international importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the crude extract of the larvae of Phaenopsectra flavipes (Diptera: Chironomidae) on the immune system of a murine model. The results proved an inflammatory effect of the larval extract in respiratory tracts.

L’effet inflammatoire de l’extrait brut de Phaenopsectra flavipes (Diptera : Chironomidae) du Nord-Est algérien, chez un modèle murin / The inflammatory effect of the crude extract of Phaenopsectra flavipes Northeast Algeria, in a mouse model  
Z. Bensakhri, K. Zerguine, I. Bouguenoun, D. Bendjeddou
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(7):485-493

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Erratum to: In patients with LTP syndrome food-specific IgE show a predictable hierarchical order.  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Nov;46(6):239

New risks from ancient food dyes: cochineal red allergy.  
Voltolini S, Pellegrini S, Contatore M, Bignardi D, Minale P.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Nov;46(6):232-233

Occupational anaphylaxis - An EAACI task force consensus statement.  
Siracusa A, Folletti I, Gerth van WR, Jeebhay M, Moscato G, Quirce S, Raulf M, Rueff F, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Whitaker P, Tarlo S.
Allergy 2014 Nov 5;

Serum IgE-targeted elimination diets for treating eosinophilic esophagitis: things are not what they seem.  
Lucendo AJ, Arias A, Tenias JM, Rodriguez-Sanchez J, Gomez-Torrijos E, Feo-Brito F, Molina-Infante J.
Allergy 2014 Nov;69(11):1567-1568

Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.  
Rutkowski K, Nasser SM.
Allergy 2014 Nov;69(11):1560-1563

EAACI Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines. Protecting consumers with food allergies: understanding food consumption, meeting regulations and identifying unmet needs.  
Muraro A, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Holzhauser T, Poulsen LK, Gowland MH, Akdis CA, Mills EN, Papadopoulos N, Roberts G, Schnadt S, van Ree R, Sheikh A, Vieths S.
Allergy 2014 Nov;69(11):1464-1472

Green areas around homes reduce atopic sensitization in children.  
Ruokolainen L, von HL, Fyhrquist N, Laatikainen T, Lehtomaki J, Auvinen P, Karvonen A, Hyvarinen AM, Tillmann V, Niemela O, Knip M, Haahtela T, Pekkanen J, Hanski I.
Allergy 2014 Nov 11;

The importance of allergen avoidance in high risk infants and sensitized patients: a meta-analysis study.  
Huiyan W, Yuhe G, Juan W, Junyan Z, Shan W, Xiaojun Z, Ailin T.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Nov;6(6):525-534

Relationship between indoor air pollutant levels and residential environment in children with atopic dermatitis.  
Lee JH, Lee HS, Park MR, Lee SW, Kim EH, Cho JB, Kim J, Han Y, Jung K, Cheong HK, Lee SI, Ahn K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Nov;6(6):517-524

Food hypersensitivity in Mexican adults at 18 to 50 years of age: a questionnaire survey.  
Bedolla-Barajas M, Bedolla-Pulido TR, Camacho-Pena AS, Gonzalez-Garcia E, Morales-Romero J.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Nov;6(6):511-516

Pine nut-induced bitter dysgeusia. [French]  
Boulinguez S, Mularcyk M, Viraben R.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2014 Mar;141(3):220-222

Vemurafenib-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis. [French]  
Wantz M, Spanoudi-Kitrimi I, Lasek A, Lebas D, Quinchon JF, Modiano P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2014 Mar;141(3):215-218
Click to view abstract

Unusual sensitization to parvalbumins from certain fish species.  
Raith M, Klug C, Sesztak-Greinecker G, Balic N, Focke M, Linhart B, Hemmer W, Swoboda I.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Aug 29;

Allergy reaction mediated by Gal d 4 (lysozyme) after the induction of tolerance with egg.  
Infante S, Lopez-Matas MA, Carnes J, Fuentes V, Alonso E, Zapatero L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Aug 19;

Systemic reactions to honeybee stings and nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs.  
Pucci S, De PT, D'Alo S, Illuminati I, Makri E, Incorvaia C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Aug;113(2):237-238

House dust mite allergy: environment evaluation and disease prevention.  
Yu SJ, Liao EC, Tsai JJ.
Asia Pac Allergy 2014 Oct;4(4):241-252

The role of antiseptic agents in atopic dermatitis.  
Lee M, Van BH.
Asia Pac Allergy 2014 Oct;4(4):230-240

Hypersensitivity to pollen of four different species of Brassica: a clinico-immunologic evaluation in patients of respiratory allergy in India.  
Singh A, Shahi S, Katiyar RK, Gaur S, Jain V.
Asia Pac Allergy 2014 Oct;4(4):197-205

Clinical and diagnostic features of perioperative hypersensitivity to cefuroxime.  
Christiansen IS, Kroigaard M, Mosbech H, Skov PS, Poulsen LK, Garvey LH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Nov 14;

Airway responses towards allergens - from the airway epithelium to T cells.  
Papazian D, Hansen S, Wurtzen PA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Nov 14;

To what extent is allergen exposure a risk factor for the development of allergic disease?  
Custovic A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Nov 8;

Immunoglobulin E-antibodies to atracurium: a new diagnostic tool?  
Uyttebroek A, Sabato V, Bridts C, De CL, Ebo D.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Nov 6;

Hidden exposure to formaldehyde in a swab caused allergic contact dermatitis.  
Friis UF, Dahlin J, Bruze M, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):258-260

Bullous allergic reaction caused by colophonium in medical adhesives.  
Christoffers WA, Coenraads PJ, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):256-257

Contact allergy to Tinosorb(R) M: recommendations for diagnostic improvement.  
de Groot AC, van Zuuren EJ, Hissink D.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):251-254

Palpebral eczematous dermatitis caused by nickel in an eye pencil.  
Verhulst L, Persson L, Zimerson E, Bruze M, Vanden BK, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):247-249

Further evidence of the methylisothiazolinone epidemic.  
Madsen JT, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):246-247

Repeated open application test with methylisothiazolinone in individuals sensitive to methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone.  
Isaksson M, Gruvberger B, Goncalo M, Goossens A, Le Coz CJ, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):244-246

Methylisothiazolinone: second 'epidemic' of isothiazolinone sensitization.  
Gameiro A, Coutinho I, Ramos L, Goncalo M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):242-243

Can methylisothiazolinone be patch tested in petrolatum?  
Isaksson M, Gruvberger B, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):240-242

The rise in prevalence of contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone in the British Isles.  
Johnston GA.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):238-240

p-Phenylenediamine and other allergens in hair dye products in the United States: a consumer exposure study.  
Hamann D, Yazar K, Hamann CR, Thyssen JP, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):213-218
Click to view abstract

Contact and photocontact allergy to octocrylene: a review.  
de Groot AC, Roberts DW.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):193-204
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact dermatitis in hairdressers: an analysis of patch test data from the Danish contact dermatitis group, 2002-2011.  
Schwensen JF, Johansen JD, Veien NK, Funding AT, Avnstorp C, Osterballe M, Andersen KE, Paulsen E, Mortz CG, Sommerlund M, Danielsen A, Andersen BL, Thormann J, Kristensen O, Kristensen B, V.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):233-237
Click to view abstract

Coupled exposure to ingredients of cosmetic products: II. Preservatives.  
Uter W, Yazar K, Kratz EM, Mildau G, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):219-226
Click to view abstract

Occupational airborne contact dermatitis from benzodiazepines and other drugs.  
Swinnen I, Ghys K, Kerre S, Constandt L, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Apr;70(4):227-232
Click to view abstract

Hand dermatitis: an allergist's nightmare.  
Wold L, Chen JK, Lampel HP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Nov;14(11):474

Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.  
Macy E.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Nov;14(11):476

Fever, eosinophilia, and death: a case of minocycline hypersensitivity.  
Wu PA, Anadkat MJ.
Cutis 2014 Feb;93(2):107-110
Click to view abstract

Vibratory angioedema in a trumpet professor.  
Sarmast SA, Fang F, Zic J.
Cutis 2014 Feb;93(2):E10-E11

New Strategies for Allergen T Cell Epitope Identification: Going beyond IgE.  
Schulten V, Peters B, Sette A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 15;165(2):75-82

Goat's cheese anaphylaxis after cutaneous sensitization by moisturizer that contained goat's milk.  
Voskamp AL, Zubrinich CM, Abramovitch JB, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):629-630

Patterns of aeroallergen sensitization predicting risk for asthma in preschool children with atopic dermatitis.  
Calamelli E, Ricci G, Neri I, Ricci L, Rondelli R, Pession A, Patrizi A.
J Asthma 2014 Nov 24;1-7

Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.  
Szebeni J.
Mol Immunol 2014 Oct;61(2):163-173
Click to view abstract

Can family history and cord blood IgE predict sensitization and allergic diseases up to adulthood?  
Nissen SP, Kjaer HF, Host A, Nielsen J, Halken S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 25;

Differences between observers in interpreting double blind placebo controlled food challenges: A randomized trial.  
Brand PL, Landzaat-Berghuizen MA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 18;

Component resolved diagnosis: Performance of specific IgE to Alternaria compared to Alt a 1.  
Nieto M, Lafuente I, Calderon R, Uixera S, Pina R, Calaforra S, Cortell I, Nieto A, Mazon A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 11;

Changing patterns of antigen exposure and their impact on the prevalence of allergy.  
Chang TW.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

Soy allergy complicating disease management in a child with coeliac disease.  
Syrigou E, Angelakopoulou A, Merikas E, Syrigos K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

Determination of the clinical egg allergy phenotypes using component-resolved diagnostics.  
Dang TD, Mills CE, Allen KJ.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

NSAID hypersensitivity in twins.  
Caimmi SM, Manca E, Caimmi D, Marseglia GL, Demoly P.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 sensitization predict peanut allergy in Mediterranean pediatric patients.  
Agabriel C, Ghazouani O, Birnbaum J, Valerie L, Porri F, Gouitaa M, Cleach I, Grob JJ, Bongrand P, Sarles J, Vitte J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Nov 7;

Les facteurs de risque de l’allergie alimentaire : des allergènes alimentaires au syndrome de Kounis… / The risk factors for food allergy: food allergens Kounis syndrome. Editorial  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(7):477-479
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L’effet inflammatoire de l’extrait brut de Phaenopsectra flavipes (Diptera : Chironomidae) du Nord-Est algérien, chez un modèle murin / The inflammatory effect of the crude extract of Phaenopsectra flavipes Northeast Algeria, in a mouse model  
Z. Bensakhri, K. Zerguine, I. Bouguenoun, D. Bendjeddou
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(7):485-493
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Les facteurs de risque d’allergie alimentaire chez l’adulte / Food allergy risk factors in adults  
M. Morisset, F. Morel-Codreanu, C. Hilger, C. Lehners, A. Kuehn, F. Hentges
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(7):513-518
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L’hypersensibilité allergique aux aliments au cours du syndrome de l’intestin irritable / Hypersensitivity allergic to foods in the irritable bowel syndrome  
R. Dainese-Plichon, M.-H. Vivinus-Nébot, T. Piche, H. Bzioueche-Hadhiri, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(7):529-534
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