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 Allergy Advisor Digest - October 2012
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of squid.
Read Sudden loss of cow's milk tolerance in a long-sensitized patient.
Read Anisakis simplex: current knowledge.
Read Systemic contact dermatitis to corticosteroids.
Read Immunologic evaluation of ofloxacin hypersensitivity.
Read Identity of the fungal species present in the homes of asthmatic children.
Read Redefining the major peanut allergens.
Read Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have similar allergenic activity and are substantially redundant.
Read Evaluation of the effect of pollution and fungal disease on Pinus radiata pollen allergenicity.
Read Quantitation of IgE binding to the chitinase and chitinase-like house dust mite allergens Der p 15 and Der p 18
Read Recombinant Pan b 1, a major allergen of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis.
Read Evaluation of allergenicity of acid-hydrolyzed wheat protein using an in vitro elicitation test.
Read Anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria from eating Chinese bayberry fruit.
Read Children monosensitized to pine nuts have similar patterns of sensitization.
Read Cow's milk associated rectal bleeding: a population based prospective study.
Read Cross-reactivity in grasses: biochemical attributes define exemplar relevance.

Abstracts shared in October 2012 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Delayed anaphylaxis to red meat in patients with IgE Specific for Galactose alpha-1,3-Galactose (alpha-gal).
Read Selective anaphylaxis to paracetamol in a child.
Read Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.
Read Retrospective multicenter survey on food-related symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy in NICU neonates.
Read IgE, but not IgG4, antibodies to Ara h 2 distinguish peanut allergy from asymptomatic peanut sensitization.
Read Identification and characterisation of main allergic proteins in Vitis vinifera vitis.
Read Anisakis simplex hypersensitivity is associated with chronic urticaria in endemic areas.
Read Clinical features of children with venom allergy and risk factors for severe systemic reactions.
Read Analysis of protein composition of red wine in comparison with rose and white wines
Read Anaphylaxis to cow's milk formula containing a short-chain galacto-oligosaccharide prebiotic.
Read Severe pepper allergy in a young child.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of squid.
A 62-year-old man ingested dressed salmon and its roe (ikura) and grilled mackerel and one hour later further ingested raw tuna and squid. Soon after the ingestion of raw seafood, he showed wheals, loss of consciousness and low blood pressure. Skin prick tests and specific serum IgE for Anisakis simplex was positive but negative to the other seafoods ingested. Immunoblot analysis of A. simplex extract using the patient serum showed two highly intense protein bands at 18 and 17 kDa, one intense band at 35 kDa and two weak bands at 28 and 26 kDa. ELISA with 11 natural or recombinant A. simplex allergens (Ani s 1-6, 8, 9, 11 and 12 and troponin C-like protein) showed that the patient serum strongly reacted to Ani s 1 and Ani s 12 and weakly to Ani s 2 and troponin C-like protein. Based on these results, he was diagnosed as IgE-mediated A. simplex allergy due to four allergens (Ani s 1, Ani s 2, Ani s 12 and troponin C-like protein), possibly from infested raw squid.

A case of an allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex possibly after the ingestion of squid - successful detection of four A. simplex allergens, ani s 1, ani s 2, ani s 12 and troponin C-like protein-. [Japanese]  
Iijima S, Moriyama T, Ichikawa H, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K.
Arerugi 2012 Aug;61(8):1104-1110

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sudden loss of cow's milk tolerance in a long-sensitized patient.
The authors report a case of sudden loss of cow's milk tolerance in a long-sensitized girl with celiac disease after a short period of milkless diet. They hypothesize that the continuous intake of high quantities of antigen sustained tolerance despite high levels of specific IgE and that, in the presence of epithelial barrier dysfunction caused by celiac disease, the few weeks of allergen-free diet led to a rapid loss of tolerance.

Sudden loss of cow's milk tolerance in a long-sensitized patient.  
Dello II, Verga MC.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):172-174

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anisakis simplex: current knowledge.
Anisakiasis, firstly described in 1960s in the Netherlands, is a fish-borne parasitic disease caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked fish or cephalopods contaminated by third stage (13) larvae of the Anisakidae family, in particular Anisakis simplex (As), A. pegreffii and Pseudoterranova decipiens. Every year, approximately 20,000 cases of anisakiasis were reported worldwide, over 90% are from Japan and most others in Spain, the Netherlands and Germany, depending on the habits of fish consuming. Live As larvae can elicit i) a parasitic infection of the digestive tract or, occasionally, other organs, causing erosive and/or haemorrhagic lesions, ascites, perforations until granulomas and masses, if larva is not removed, and ii) allergic reactions, as anaphylaxis, acute/chronic urticaria and angioedema. Like other parasite infestations, As larva induces an immune adaptive response characterised by T-lymphocyte proliferation with polyclonal and monoclonal (responsible for As allergic symptoms) IgE production, eosinophilia and mastocytosis. Several As allergens, many of which thermostable, were described In particular the major allergen Ani s 1 and Ani s 7 could characterized a past or a recent infection. There is a general agreement that an active infection is required to initiate allergic sensitivity to Anisakis. Until now, the only effective treatment for anisakiasis is the endoscopic removal of live larvae and the best protection against anisakiasis is to educate consumers about the dangers of eating raw fish and to recommend avoiding the consumption of raw or inadequately thermally treated marine fish or cephalopods.

Anisakis simplex: current knowledge.  
Pravettoni V, Primavesi L, Piantanida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):150-156

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Systemic contact dermatitis to corticosteroids.
Sixteen subjects (out of 315 with CS delayed-type hypersensitivity) presented with allergic manifestations due to systemic administration of corticosteroids. Most patients reacted to molecules from the three groups of the recently reappraised classification. The reactions observed seem to be in most cases 'systemic contact dermatitis' due to oral or parenteral re-exposure of sensitized individuals with the respective corticosteroids previously applied topically. Moreover, most patients seem to be able to react to any corticosteroid molecules and therefore need a systematic individualized evaluation of their sensitization/tolerance profile.

Systemic contact dermatitis to corticosteroids.  
Baeck M, Goossens A.
Allergy 2012 Oct 4;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunologic evaluation of ofloxacin hypersensitivity.
Quinolone hypersensitivity, most of which is immediate type, is rare but has increased in recent years. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying immediate reactions are not defined clearly. This study was aimed to observe the clinical characteristics of immediate hypersensitivity to ofloxacin and to investigate the pathogenic mechanism with detection of serum specific IgE to ofloxacin using an enzyme-linked immunoasorbent assay (ELISA). We recruited 5 patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to ofloxacin (group I), and as control groups, 5 subjects with ciprofloxacin hypersensitivity (group II) and 20 healthy subjects with no history of drug allergy. Serum specific-IgE to ofloxacin-human serum albumin (HSA) conjugate was detectable in four group I subjects (80%) and three group II subjects (60%). The ELISA inhibition test showed significant inhibition with both ofloxacin-HSA conjugate and free ofloxacin in a dose-dependent manner. As to ciprofloxacin, significant inhibition was noted upon addition of free ciprofloxacin in one subject, while minimal inhibition was noted in the other. We confirmed that an IgE-mediated response is a major pathogenic mechanism of ofloxacin hypersensitivity. Cross reactivity between ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin was noted with individual difference

Immunologic evaluation of ofloxacin hypersensitivity.  
Nam YH, Kim JE, Kim SH, Jin HJ, Hwang EK, Shin YS, Ye YM, Park HS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Nov;4(6):367-369

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identity of the fungal species present in the homes of asthmatic children.
This study explored the fungal species spectrum in 88 homes with at least one asthmatic child in the Middle West region of the United States mostly during late spring and fall season in comparison with 85 homes that did not contain an asthmatic child during flu season. The results indicated that Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Basidiospores, Epicoccum and Pithomyces were found in more asthmatic homes than in homes without an asthmatic child or existed in higher concentration in asthmatic homes than in homes without an asthmatic child even after adjusting outdoor spore concentration. The results for culturable fungal species confirmed most of these findings even after adjusting for seasonal factors. Although Alternaria was commonly found in both kinds of homes, there was no significant difference in detection rate or concentration of Alternaria between asthmatic homes and homes without an asthmatic child by either spore counting or culturable airborne detection. Since many allergens have been identified in these fungal species, identifying and controlling these fungal species in asthmatic homes might be expected to improve asthma care and benefit asthmatic children

Identity of the fungal species present in the homes of asthmatic children.  
Meng J, Barnes CS, Rosenwasser LJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1448-1458

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Redefining the major peanut allergens.
Food allergy has become a major public health concern in westernized countries, and allergic reactions to peanuts are particularly common and severe. Allergens are defined as antigens that elicit an IgE response, and most allergenic materials (e.g., pollens, danders, and foods) contain multiple allergenic proteins. This has led to the concept that there are "major" allergens and allergens of less importance. "Major allergens" have been defined as allergens that bind a large amount of IgE from the majority of patients and have biologic activity. However, the ability of an allergen to cross-link complexes of IgE and its high-affinity receptor FceRI (IgE/FceRI), which we have termed its allergic effector activity, does not correlate well with assays of IgE binding. To identify the proteins that are the most active allergens in peanuts, we and others have employed in vitro model assays of allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE/FceRI complexes and have demonstrated that the most potent allergens are not necessarily those that bind the most IgE. The importance of a specific allergen can be determined by measuring the allergic effector activity of that allergen following purification under non-denaturing conditions and by specifically removing the allergen from a complex allergenic extract either by chromatography or by specific immunodepletion. In our studies of peanut allergens, our laboratory has found that two related allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, together account for the majority of the effector activity in a crude peanut extract. Furthermore, murine studies demonstrated that Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are not only the major elicitors of anaphylaxis in this system, but also can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic mice. As a result of these observations, we propose that the definition of a major allergen should be based on the potency of that allergen in assays of allergic effector activity and demonstration that removal of that allergen from an extract results in loss of potency. Using these criteria, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are the major peanut allergens.

Redefining the major peanut allergens.  
Zhuang Y, Dreskin SC.
Immunol Res 2012 Sep 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have similar allergenic activity and are substantially redundant.
The moderately homologous (approx. 60%) proteins Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are the most potent peanut allergens. This study was designed to define the relative individual contributions of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 to the overall allergenic activity of a crude peanut extract (CPE). The potency of the native proteins were significantly different (p < 0.0001) although not dramatically so, with a rank order of Ara h 2.01 > Ara h 2.02 > Ara h 6. The addition of either purified Ara h 2 or Ara h 6 independently at their original concentration to CPE depleted of both Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 restored 80-100% of the original CPE allergenic activity. This study indicates that either Ara h 2 or Ara h 6 independently can account for most of the allergenic activity in a CPE and demonstrate important redundancy in the allergenic activity of these related molecules.

Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have similar allergenic activity and are substantially redundant.  
Chen X, Wang Q, El-Mezayen R, Zhuang Y, Dreskin SC.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):251-258

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of the effect of pollution and fungal disease on Pinus radiata pollen allergenicity.
A greater allergenic potency (skin tests and sIgE), is observed in pine pollen coming from unpolluted areas. The authors suggest that this may be related to a higher exposure to ozone, resulting in a greater expression of allergenic proteins.

Evaluation of the effect of pollution and fungal disease on Pinus radiata pollen allergenicity.  
Garcia-Gallardo MV, Algorta J, Longo N, Espinel S, Aragones A, Lombardero M, Bernaola G, Jauregui I, Aranzabal A, Albizu MV, Gastaminza G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):241-250

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Quantitation of IgE binding to the chitinase and chitinase-like house dust mite allergens Der p 15 and Der p 18
The prevalence of IgE binding to the group 15 and 18 house dust mite (HDM) allergens of the Dermatophagoides species is reported to be >50% and they are the major allergens of HDM-sensitised dogs. The objective was to quantitate the IgE titres to Der p 15 and Der p 18 and evaluate their importance in human HDM sensitisation compared to the known major and mid-tier allergens. The prevalence of IgE titres to Der p 15 and Der p 18 >0.1 ng/ml was low (38%) and only one subject had a titre >10 ng/ml to either allergen. The mean anti-Der p 15 and Der p 18 titres were approximately 10- to 20-fold lower than the response to the major Der p 1 and Der p 2 allergens. The IgE responses to Der p 15 and Der p 18 were lower than the mid-tier allergens Der p 5 and Der p 7 and although they correlated with each other, they did not correlate with titres to either the major or mid-tier allergens. Therefore sensitisation to Der p 15 and Der p 18 makes a minor contribution to anti-HDM IgE titres, and the titres do not correlate with the size of the response to the major allergens.

Quantitation of IgE binding to the chitinase and chitinase-like house dust mite allergens Der p 15 and Der p 18 compared to the major and mid-range allergens.  
Hales BJ, Elliot CE, Chai LY, Pearce LJ, Tipayanon T, Hazell L, Stone S, Piboonpocanun S, Thomas WR, Smith WA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):233-240

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant Pan b 1, a major allergen of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis.
The shrimp species Pandalus borealis is the commercially most important coldwater shrimp species, and its protein extract is commonly used in shrimp allergy diagnostics. The DNA sequence of its major allergen, tropomyosin, designated Pan b 1, has not previously been described. cDNA from Pan b 1 was generated, and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein shared 97-100% identity with other shrimp tropomyosins. Immunoblot and ELISA studies as well as BATs and SPTs showed equivalent results of recombinant and natural Pan b 1.

Structural and immunological characterization of recombinant Pan b 1, a major allergen of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis.  
Myrset HR, Barletta B, Di FG, Egaas E, Dooper MM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):221-232

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of allergenicity of acid-hydrolyzed wheat protein using an in vitro elicitation test.
This study determined the ability of different types of wheat-allergic patients' IgE to induce humanized mast cell activation after the addition of various time-treated acid-hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWPs). The reactivity of heat- and various time-treated acid-hydrolyzed glutens (acid-HGs) and commercial acid-HWP (HWP1), using serum IgE from wheat allergy accompanied by skin and rhinoconjunctival sensitization to HWP1 in the facial soap, pediatric subjects with food allergy to native wheat, adult wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis subjects, and nonatopic healthy subjects, was elucidated by dot blot and a luciferase assay-based in vitro elicitation test (EXiLE test). Even after prolonged hydrolyzation, acid-HGs still retained the ability to activate mast cells in the case of HWP1-sensitized subjects

Evaluation of allergenicity of acid-hydrolyzed wheat protein using an in vitro elicitation test.  
Nakamura R, Nakamura R, Adachi R, Itagaki Y, Fukutomi Y, Teshima R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 17;160(3):259-264

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria from eating Chinese bayberry fruit.
Chinese bayberry Myrica rubra is a very popular fruit in southeastern China. A native myrica cerifera bayberry (or wax-myrtle), within the same genus, has been reported as a tree pollen allergen source in USA. A 40-year-old woman experienced anaphylaxis from Chinese bayberry fruit. Prick-prick skin tests were strongly positive to fresh Chinese bayberry fruits as well as to peach, and weaker reactions to some other fruits including apple, melon, and banana. Identical titers of specific IgE (4.3 kU(A)/L) to peach extract and its lipid transfer protein (LTP, rPru p 3) was shown, confirmed by detection of a 9 kD band following immunoblotting. Immunoblot analysis with Chinese bayberry extract gave bands of 22, 45, and 90 kD, but no 9 kD band was recognized. There was also no evidence of LTP recognition for loquat (36 kD) or melon (24 kD). This first report of a severe allergic reaction to Chinese bayberry fruit in a patient with LTP-mediated peach allergy indicates that other as yet unidentified non-pollen related fruit allergens are involved in this new severe fruit allergy. (Wang 2012 ref.28303 5)

Anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria from eating Chinese bayberry fruit.  
Wang HY, Gao ZS, Yang ZW, Shao JX, Zhao XZ, Dai Y, van Ree R.
Miscellaneous 592 2012 Oct;13(10):851-854.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Children monosensitized to pine nuts have similar patterns of sensitization.
The aim of this study was to identify the major pine nut allergens in a group of children monosensitized to pine nuts. Five children with pine nut allergies only were investigated. Five similar protein bands between 6 and 47 kDa in all the subjects studied were demonstrated.

Children monosensitized to pine nuts have similar patterns of sensitization.  
Novembre E, Mori F, Barni S, Ferrante G, Pucci N, Ballabio C, Uberti F, Penas E, Restani P.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow's milk associated rectal bleeding: a population based prospective study.
Isolated rectal bleeding in infants is often attributed to the consumption of cow's milk. However, the prevalence of this condition has not been described, and its preferred diagnostic methods and management are controversial. A prospective population-based study following 13,019 children from birth, 21 infants with isolated rectal bleeding attributed to cow's milk protein consumption were identified. The prevalence of isolated rectal bleeding attributed to cow's milk consumption was 0.16%. All infants were asymptomatic within days of dietary modifications. Eleven of the 14 infants (78.5%) whose parents reintroduced cow's milk protein to their diet following our evaluation tolerated it with no adverse effects. Those 11 infants were significantly younger at initial consumption of cow's milk protein (6.7 +/- 1.6 months) compared to those who continued elimination diet (17.7 +/- 9.2 months), (p = 0.002) while their 1-yr hemoglobin levels were comparable (p = 0.98). No risk factors for rectal bleeding were identified.

Cow's milk associated rectal bleeding: a population based prospective study.  
Elizur A, Cohen M, Goldberg MR, Rajuan N, Cohen A, Leshno M, Katz Y.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 11;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactivity in grasses: biochemical attributes define exemplar relevance.
Broad-spectrum grass pollen immunotherapies contain large numbers of allergenic proteins from multiple species. The principle of homologous grouping is used as a tool to assist in the standardization of allergen immunotherapy. This study reviews the principle of homologous grouping, questions what an exemplar grass should be, and queries whether a 1-way system of inferring homology is appropriate. Grass pollens were extracted and analyzed using a variety of techniques. Variation in protein content, IgG, IgE, and Phl p 5 reactivity is evident among all grasses analyzed. There is significant evidence of similarity but also disparity consistent with variation resulting from evolutionary change. Proprietary software called Gel Electrophoresis Protein Profile Analysis has been developed, which highlights that each grass exhibits a greater than 55% similarity measure; this is considered high similarity. None of the grass species examined display an identical biological profile. However, data indicate that there is a high degree of homology. The data are considered to be sufficient to include Crested Dogstail within the sweet grasses group of the Pooideae family; however, the subtle differences in grasses also justify the inclusion of multiple species to create a broad-spectrum immunotherapy.

Cross-reactivity in grasses: biochemical attributes define exemplar relevance.  
Bullimore, Alan; Batten, Toby; Hewings, Simon; Fischer von Weikersthal-Drachenberg, Karl Juergen; Skinner, Murray
WAO Journal 2012;5(9):95-102.

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

A case of an allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex possibly after the ingestion of squid - successful detection of four A. simplex allergens, ani s 1, ani s 2, ani s 12 and troponin C-like protein-. [Japanese]  
Iijima S, Moriyama T, Ichikawa H, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K.
Arerugi 2012 Aug;61(8):1104-1110
Click to view abstract

Analysis of cytology in nasal smear of Japanese ceder pollinosis before and in season. [Japanese]  
Otsuka H, Takanashi M, Okubo K.
Arerugi 2012 Aug;61(8):1092-1103
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Latex allergy safety-measures guideline 2009 -the latex allergy which should be understood at least-. [Japanese]  
Akasawa A.
Arerugi 2012 Aug;61(8):1067-1072

Establishment of the oral food challenge network. [Japanese]  
Ito K.
Arerugi 2012 Aug;61(8):1047-1053

Overview of component resolved diagnostics.  
Treudler R, Simon JC.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Oct 18;
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Climate Change and Allergic Disease.  
Bielory L, Lyons K, Goldberg R.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Oct 13;
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Use of omalizumab in the treatment of food allergy and anaphylaxis.  
Lieberman JA, Chehade M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Oct 11;
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Delayed anaphylaxis to red meat in patients with IgE Specific for Galactose alpha-1,3-Galactose (alpha-gal).  
Commins SP, Platts-Mills TA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Oct 9;
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Is European legislation killing allergy diagnostics?  
Zuberbier T, Werfel T.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;12(5):475-476

Guidelines change the diagnostic process of cow milk food allergy: problem-based learning.  
Assa'ad A, Fiocchi A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;12(5):564-569
Click to view abstract

Sudden loss of cow's milk tolerance in a long-sensitized patient.  
Dello II, Verga MC.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):172-174
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Monosensitization to a novel plane pollen allergen.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S, Villalta D.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):167-169
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Selective anaphylaxis to paracetamol in a child.  
Couto M, Gaspar A, Morais-Almeida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):163-166
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Aspirin challenge/desensitisation before coronary stenting in subjects with history of hypersensitivity. A pragmatic approach.  
Cortellini G, Testi S, Severino M, Chechi T, Iorno ML, Santucci A, Corvetta A, Piovaccari G, Santarelli A, Franco N, Canonica GW, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):160-162
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Ragweed allergy in northern Italy: are patterns of sensitization changing?  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):157-159
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Anisakis simplex: current knowledge.  
Pravettoni V, Primavesi L, Piantanida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Aug;44(4):150-156
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Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.  
Chinuki Y, Morita E.
Allergol Int 2012 Oct 25;
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Retrospective multicenter survey on food-related symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy in NICU neonates.  
Miyazawa T, Itabashi K, Imai T.
Allergol Int 2012 Oct 25;
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IgE, but not IgG4, antibodies to Ara h 2 distinguish peanut allergy from asymptomatic peanut sensitization.  
Hong X, Caruso D, Kumar R, Liu R, Liu X, Wang G, Pongracic JA, Wang X.
Allergy 2012 Oct 25;

Palladium-induced Th2 cytokine responses reflect skin test reactivity.  
Muris J, Feilzer AJ, Kleverlaan CJ, Rustemeyer T, van H, Scheper RJ, von Blomberg BM.
Allergy 2012 Oct 16;
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An IgE epitope of Bet v 1 and fagales PR10 proteins as defined by a human monoclonal IgE.  
Hecker J, Diethers A, Schulz D, Sabri A, Plum M, Michel Y, Mempel M, Ollert M, Jakob T, Blank S, Braren I, Spillner E.
Allergy 2012 Oct 16;
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Systemic contact dermatitis to corticosteroids.  
Baeck M, Goossens A.
Allergy 2012 Oct 4;
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Microarray evaluation of specific IgE to allergen components in elite athletes.  
Bonini M, Marcomini L, Gramiccioni C, Tranquilli C, Melioli G, Canonica GW, Bonini S.
Allergy 2012 Oct 4;
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Immunologic evaluation of ofloxacin hypersensitivity.  
Nam YH, Kim JE, Kim SH, Jin HJ, Hwang EK, Shin YS, Ye YM, Park HS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Nov;4(6):367-369
Click to view abstract

Standardization of house dust mite extracts in Korea.  
Jeong KY, Choi SY, Lee JH, Lee IY, Yong TS, Lee JS, Hong CS, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Nov;4(6):346-350
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Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness to Methacholine and AMP in Children With Atopic Asthma.  
Kang SH, Kim HY, Seo JH, Kwon JW, Jung YH, Song YH, Hong SJ.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Nov;4(6):341-345
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House dust mite allergy in Korea: the most important inhalant allergen in current and future.  
Jeong KY, Park JW, Hong CS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2012 Nov;4(6):313-325
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Role of fungal colonization for sensitization in asthma.  
Ogawa H, Fujimura M, Takeuchi Y, Makimura K.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1540-1541

Lipid transfer protein syndrome: clinical pattern, cofactor effect and profile of molecular sensitization to plant-foods and pollens.  
Pascal M, Munoz-Cano R, Reina Z, Palacin A, Vilella R, Picado C, Juan M, Sanchez-Lopez J, Rueda M, Salcedo G, Valero A, Yague J, Bartra J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1529-1539
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Trends in cutaneous sensitization in the first 18 years of life: results from the 1989 Isle of Wight birth cohort study.  
Roberts G, Zhang H, Karmaus W, Raza A, Scott M, Matthews S, Kurukulaaratchy RJ, Dean T, Arshad SH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1501-1509
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Comparison of Timothy grass pollen extract- and single major allergen-induced gene expression and mediator release in airway epithelial cells: a meta-analysis.  
Roschmann KI, van Kuijen AM, Luiten S, Jonker MJ, Breit TM, Fokkens WJ, Petersen A, van Drunen CM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1479-1490
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Identity of the fungal species present in the homes of asthmatic children.  
Meng J, Barnes CS, Rosenwasser LJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Oct;42(10):1448-1458
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Allergen of the month-European aspen.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Oct;109(4):A17

Vancomycin-induced DRESS with evidence of T-cell activation in a 22-month-old patient.  
Kitcharoensakkul M, Ree N, Bloomberg GR, Dehner LP, Heidingsfelder JA, White AJ, Cooper MA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Oct;109(4):280-281

Factors contributing to risks for pediatric asthma in rural Saskatchewan.  
Barry RJ, Pickett W, Rennie DC, Senthilselvan A, Cockcroft DW, Lawson JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Oct;109(4):255-259
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Identification and characterisation of main allergic proteins in Vitis vinifera vitis.  
Falak R, Sankian M, Noorbakhsh R, Tehrani M, Assarehzadegan MA, Jabbari Azad F, Abolhasani A, Varasteh AR.
Food Agric Immunol 2012(0):-
Abstract

Redefining the major peanut allergens.  
Zhuang Y, Dreskin SC.
Immunol Res 2012 Sep 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Acoustic rhinometry and aspirin nasal challenge in the diagnosis of aspirin-intolerant asthma: clinical finding and safety aspects.  
Munoz-Cano R, Bartra J, Sanchez-Lopez J, Picado C, Bissinger I, Valero A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 18;160(3):307-312
Click to view abstract

Anisakis simplex hypersensitivity is associated with chronic urticaria in endemic areas.  
Ventura MT, Napolitano S, Menga R, Cecere R, Asero R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 18;160(3):297-300
Click to view abstract

Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have similar allergenic activity and are substantially redundant.  
Chen X, Wang Q, El-Mezayen R, Zhuang Y, Dreskin SC.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):251-258
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of the effect of pollution and fungal disease on Pinus radiata pollen allergenicity.  
Garcia-Gallardo MV, Algorta J, Longo N, Espinel S, Aragones A, Lombardero M, Bernaola G, Jauregui I, Aranzabal A, Albizu MV, Gastaminza G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):241-250
Click to view abstract

Quantitation of IgE binding to the chitinase and chitinase-like house dust mite allergens Der p 15 and Der p 18 compared to the major and mid-range allergens.  
Hales BJ, Elliot CE, Chai LY, Pearce LJ, Tipayanon T, Hazell L, Stone S, Piboonpocanun S, Thomas WR, Smith WA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):233-240
Click to view abstract

Structural and immunological characterization of recombinant Pan b 1, a major allergen of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis.  
Myrset HR, Barletta B, Di FG, Egaas E, Dooper MM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 16;160(3):221-232
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of allergenicity of acid-hydrolyzed wheat protein using an in vitro elicitation test.  
Nakamura R, Nakamura R, Adachi R, Itagaki Y, Fukutomi Y, Teshima R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 17;160(3):259-264
Click to view abstract

Clinical features of children with venom allergy and risk factors for severe systemic reactions.  
Yavuz ST, Sahiner UM, Buyuktiryaki B, Soyer OU, Sackesen C, Sekerel BE, Tuncer A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 18;160(3):313-321
Click to view abstract

Analysis of protein composition of red wine in comparison with rose and white wines by electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS).  
Wigand P, Tenzer S, Schild H, Decker H.
J Agric Food Chem 2009 May 27;57(10):4328-4333

Anaphylaxis caused by hidden soybean allergens in pillows.  
Armentia A, Pineda F, Martin B, San MA, Martin Gil FJ, Puente Y, de LC, Palacios R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct 26;

Anaphylaxis to cow's milk formula containing short-chain galacto-oligosaccharide.  
Chiang WC, Huang CH, Llanora GV, Gerez I, Goh SH, Shek LP, Nauta AJ, Van Doorn WA, Bindels J, Ulfman LH, Knipping K, Delsing DJ, Knol EF, Lee BW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct 23;
Click to view abstract

Egg: A frequent trigger of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.  
Hsu P, Mehr S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct 12;

Pru p 3 acts as a strong sensitizer for peanut allergy in Spain.  
Javaloyes G, Goikoetxea MJ, Nunez IG, Aranda A, Sanz ML, Blanca M, Diaz PA, da SJ, Esparza I, Del P, Blazquez AB, Scheurer S, Vieths S, Ferrer M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct 12;

Tolerant beekeepers display venom-specific functional IgG(4) antibodies in the absence of specific IgE.  
Varga EM, Kausar F, Aberer W, Zach M, Eber E, Durham SR, Shamji MH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct 11;

The myth of hypoallergenic dogs (and cats).  
Lockey RF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;130(4):910-911

Science from a black box.  
Aalberse RC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;130(4):902-903

Peanut allergy diagnoses among children residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota.  
Rinaldi M, Harnack L, Oberg C, Schreiner P, St SJ, Travis LL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;130(4):945-950
Click to view abstract

Which factors in raw cow's milk contribute to protection against allergies?  
van Neerven RJ, Knol EF, Heck JM, Savelkoul HF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;130(4):853-858
Click to view abstract

Airborne particulate matter-associated endotoxin and proinflammatory responses.  
Gangamma S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;130(4):1012

Associations between Pollen Counts, Pollutants, and Asthma-Related Hospital Admissions in a High-Density Indian Metropolis.  
Ghosh D, Chakraborty P, Gupta J, Biswas A, Roy I, Das S, Gupta-Bhattacharya S.
J Asthma 2012 Oct;49(8):792-799
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria from eating Chinese bayberry fruit.  
Wang HY, Gao ZS, Yang ZW, Shao JX, Zhao XZ, Dai Y, van Ree R.
Miscellaneous 592 2012 Oct;13(10):851-854.
Abstract

Severe pepper allergy in a young child.  
Gimenez L, Zacharisen M.
Miscellaneous WMJ 2011 Jun;110(3):138-9.
Abstract

Oral food challenge: safety, adherence to guidelines and predictive value of skin prick testing.  
Calvani M, Berti I, Fiocchi A, Galli E, Giorgio V, Martelli A, Miceli SS, Panetta V.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 29;
Click to view abstract

Children monosensitized to pine nuts have similar patterns of sensitization.  
Novembre E, Mori F, Barni S, Ferrante G, Pucci N, Ballabio C, Uberti F, Penas E, Restani P.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 29;
Click to view abstract

High prevalence of food sensitisation in young children with liver disease: a clue to food allergy pathogenesis?  
Brown C, Haringman N, Davies C, Gore C, Hussain M, Mieli-Vergani G, Vergani D, Warner JO, Marks SD, Boyle RJ.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 11;
Click to view abstract

Cow's milk associated rectal bleeding: a population based prospective study.  
Elizur A, Cohen M, Goldberg MR, Rajuan N, Cohen A, Leshno M, Katz Y.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Oct 11;
Click to view abstract

Cross-reactivity in grasses: biochemical attributes define exemplar relevance.  
Bullimore, Alan; Batten, Toby; Hewings, Simon; Fischer von Weikersthal-Drachenberg, Karl Juergen; Skinner, Murray
WAO Journal 2012;5(9):95-102.
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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