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 Allergy Advisor Digest - September 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the September 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Food allergy: practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention.
Read Milk hypersensitivities: where is the grey line regarding their dietary management?
Read Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in pre-school children with cow's milk allergy.
Read Eosinophilia in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Japan.
Read Allergy testing in children with persistent asthma: Comparison of four diagnostic methods.
Read Cannabis sativa allergy: looking through the fog.
Read The clinical relevance of birch pollen profilin cross reactivity in sensitized patients.
Read Vacuolar serine protease is a major allergen of Fusarium proliferatum and an IgE-cross reactive pan-fungal allergen.
Read Orthologous allergens and diagnostic utility of major allergen Alt a 1.
Read Does spore count matter in fungal allergy?: the role of allergenic fungal species.
Read A novel combination of an IgE mediated adult onset food allergy and a suspected mast cell activation syndrome presenting as anaphylaxis.
Read Allergy test outcomes in patients self-reported as having penicillin allergy: Two-year experience.
Read Cow's milk allergy guidelines: a quality appraisal with the AGREE II instrument.
Read Unmet diagnostic needs in contact oral mucosal allergies.
Read Invited Commentary: Alpha-Gal allergy: tip of the iceberg to a pivotal immune response.
Read rAed a 4: A New 67-kDa Aedes aegypti mosquito salivary allergen for the diagnosis of mosquito allergy.
Read Insect sting reactions and specific IgE to venom and major allergens in a general population.
Read Frequent use of household cleaning products is associated with rhinitis in Chinese children.

Snippets posted in the September 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Histamine intolerance and dietary management: A complete review.
Read Ana o 3-specific IgE is a good predictor for clinically relevant cashew allergy in children.
Read Prevalence of fish and shellfish allergy: A systematic review.
Read Allergy to apple cultivars among patients with birch pollinosis and oral allergy syndrome.
Read Incidence of apnea attack as allergic reaction after oral food challenge in patient with IgE-mediated wheat allergy.
Read Cashew nut allergy: clinical relevance and allergen characterisation.
Read Der p 11 is a major allergen for house dust mite-allergic patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.
Read Specific IgE to Jug r 1 has no additional value compared to extract based testing in diagnosing walnut allergy in adults.
Read Lettuce allergy is a lipid transfer syndrome-related food allergy with high risk of severe reactions.
Read A rare cause of aeroallergen-induced anaphylaxis: horse allergy.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy: practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention.
ood allergies are a growing problem and currently the primary treatment of food allergy is avoidance of culprit foods. However, given the lack of information and education and also the ubiquitous nature of allergens, accidental exposures to food allergens are not uncommon. The fear of potential fatal reactions and the need of a proper avoidance leads in most of the cases to the limitation of leisure and social activities. This review aims to be a practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention regarding activities like shopping, eating out, and travelling. The recommendations are focused especially on proper reading of food labels and the management of the disease, namely in restaurants and airplanes, concerning cross-contact and communication with other stakeholders. The implementation of effective tools is essential to manage food allergy outside home, avoid serious allergic reactions and minimize the disease's impact on individuals' quality of life

Food allergy: practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention.  
Padua I, Moreira A, Moreira P, Barros R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;48(5):174-181

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Milk hypersensitivities: where is the grey line regarding their dietary management?
The proportion of people suffering or reporting to have a hypersensitivity caused by cow's milk consumption is increasing, and even health professionals often face difficulties into elaborating properly with a milk reaction due to misdiagnosis. The scope of this review is to present literature data that lead into putting the border line between cow's milk allergy and cow's milk intolerance, mainly focusing on how the different pathophysiology leads to their different dietary diagnosis and management

Milk hypersensitivities: where is the grey line regarding their dietary management?  
Vassilopoulou E, Efthymiou D.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;48(5):164-173

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in pre-school children with cow's milk allergy.
The present study aims to evaluate the frequency of psychiatric disorders and the severity of psychiatric symptoms in pre-school children with cow's milk allergy. The parents of the pre-school children with cow's milk allergy were interviewed in person and asked to fill out the Early Childhood Inventory-4 form. The cow's milk allergy group included 40 children (27 male, 13 female) with mean age, 44.5+/-14.7 months. It was established that 65% of the group with cow's milk allergy received at least one psychiatric diagnosis, while 36.6% of the control group received at least one psychiatric diagnosis, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.02). Within the psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, and attachment disorder were found significantly higher compared with the healthy control group. When the groups were compared in terms of psychiatric symptom severity scores, calculated by using the Early Childhood Inventory-4 form, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders severity (p=0.006) and oppositional defiant disorder severity (p=0.037) were found to be higher in the cow's milk allergy group.

Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in pre-school children with cow's milk allergy.  
Topal E, Catal F, Soylu N, Ozcan OO, Celiksoy MH, Babayigit A, Erge D, Karakoc HT, Sancak R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):445-449

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Eosinophilia in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Japan.
Many Japanese infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) show eosinophilia, which has been thought to be a characteristic of food protein-induced proctocolitis (FPIP). This study elucidated the characteristics of eosinophilia in Japanese FPIES patients, 113 infants with non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy due to cow's milk were enrolled and classified into FPIES (n = 94) and FPIP (n = 19). The percentage of peripheral blood eosinophils (Eo) was increased in most FPIES patients (median, 7.5%), which was comparable with that in FPIP patients (9.0%). Among FPIES patients, Eo was the highest in patients who had vomiting, bloody stool, and diarrhea simultaneously (12.9%) and lowest in patients with diarrhea alone (3.2%). Eo showed a significant positive correlation with the incidence of vomiting (Cramer's V = 0.31, p < 0.005) and bloody stool (Cramer's V = 0.34, p < 0.0005). A significant difference was found in Eo between early- (10 days, n = 38) FPIES (median, 9.8% vs. 5.4%; p < 0.005). IL-5 production by peripheral blood T cells stimulated with cow's milk protein in early-onset FPIES was significantly higher than that in late-onset FPIES (67.7 pg/mL vs. 12.5 pg/mL, p < 0.01), and showed a significant positive correlation with Eo (rs = 0.60, p < 0.01).

Eosinophilia in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Japan.  
Kimura M, Shimomura M, Morishita H, Meguro T, Seto S.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 10;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy testing in children with persistent asthma: Comparison of four diagnostic methods.
The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and information obtained by two microarray platforms applied on a well-characterized pediatric asthma cohort. Seventy-one (71) children were recruited from a nationwide Swedish study on severe childhood asthma. Severe (n = 40) and controlled (n = 31) asthmatics were assessed for allergic sensitization by two microarray systems (Microtest and ISAC) and by two standard diagnostic methods (ImmunoCAP and skin prick test). A high prevalence of allergic sensitization was observed in this cohort. The pairwise concordance between two methods was 90-92% independently of methods compared. The sensitivity of the four methods against doctor's diagnosis was 0.77-0.88, and the specificity was 0.97-0.99. Microarray methods provided new information in 47% of the sensitized children in comparison to results obtained by standard diagnostic methods.

Allergy testing in children with persistent asthma: Comparison of four diagnostic methods.  
Onell A, Whiteman A, Nordlund B, Baldracchini F, Mazzoleni G, Hedlin G, Gronlund H, Konradsen JR.
Allergy 2016 Sep 17;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cannabis sativa allergy: looking through the fog.
IgE-mediated Cannabis (C. sativa, marihuana) allergy seems to be on the rise. Both active and passive exposure to cannabis allergens may trigger a C. sativa sensitization and/or allergy. The clinical presentation of a C. sativa allergy varies from mild to life-threatening reactions and often seems to depend on the route of exposure. In addition, sensitization to cannabis allergens can result in various cross-allergies, mostly for plant foods. This clinical entity, designated as the 'cannabis-fruit/vegetable syndrome' might also imply cross-reactivity with tobacco, natural latex and plant-food derived alcoholic beverages. Hitherto, these cross-allergies are predominantly reported in Europe and appear mainly to rely upon cross-reactivity between non-specific lipid transfer proteins (ns-LTPs) or thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) present in C. sativa and their homologues, ubiquitously distributed throughout plant kingdom. At present, diagnosis of cannabis-related allergies predominantly rests upon a thorough history completed with skin testing using native extracts from crushed buds and leaves. However, quantification of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies and basophil activation tests (BAT) can also be helpful to establish correct diagnosis. In the absence of a cure, treatment comprises absolute avoidance measures. Whether avoidance of further use will halt the extension of related cross-allergies remains uncertain.

Cannabis sativa allergy: looking through the fog.  
Decuyper II, Van Gasse AL, Cop N, Sabato V, Faber M, Mertens C, Bridts CH, Hagendorens MM, De CL, Rihs HP, Ebo DG.
Allergy 2016 Sep 3;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The clinical relevance of birch pollen profilin cross reactivity in sensitized patients.
Overlapping seasons and cross reactivity, especially to grass pollen profilin, can hamper the diagnosis of birch pollen allergy. To identify the primary sensitizing allergen and the clinical relevance of cross sensitization, the authors correlated sensitization profiles with in vitro and in vivo tests, symptom scores and pollen counts. 433 patients with positive skin prick test (SPT) to birch pollen were analyzed regarding IgE to major birch and grass pollen allergens Bet v 1 and Phl p 1/p 5 and the profilins Bet v 2 and Phl p 12. Subgroups were analyzed by basophil activation test (BAT) and CAP-FEIA based cross- and self-inhibition tests. 349 patients were sensitized to Bet v 1, 44 to both Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 and 15 patients to Bet v 2 only. From Bet v 2 sensitized patients 40 were also sensitized to Phl p 12. Ex vivo, Bet v 2 and Phl p 12 induced dose dependent activation in basophils of these patients. Cross- and self-inhibition tests with both allergens confirmed cross reactivity. However, semi-quantitative analysis of SPTs demonstrated markedly increased reactivity to grass compared to birch pollen extract in Bet v 2 only sensitized patients. Accordingly, in most of those patients clinical symptoms precisely correlated with grass pollen counts.

The clinical relevance of birch pollen profilin cross reactivity in sensitized patients.  
Wolbing F, Kunz J, Kempf WE, Grimmel C, Fischer J, Biedermann T.
Allergy 2016 Sep 2;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Vacuolar serine protease is a major allergen of Fusarium proliferatum and an IgE-cross reactive pan-fungal allergen.
Fusarium species are among prevalent airborne fungi and causative agents of human respiratory atopic disorders. The authors previously identified a 36.5-kDa F. proliferatum component recognized by IgE antibodies in 9 (53%) of the 17 F. proliferatum-sensitized atopic serum samples. The purpose of this study is to characterize the 36.5-kDa allergen of F. proliferatum. A fungal vacuolar serine protease allergen was identified. Fus p 9.0101 was subsequently cloned. Nine serum samples from respiratory atopic patients with IgE binding to the vacuolar serine protease allergen of Penicillium chrysogenum (Pen ch 18) also showed IgE-immunoblot reactivity to rFus p 9.0101. The purified rFus p 9.0101 can inhibit IgE and FUM20 binding to the 36.5-kDa component of F. proliferatum. Thus, a novel and important Fus p 9.0101 was identified. The rPen ch 18 can inhibit IgE binding to Fus p 9.0101. It indicates that IgE cross-reactivity between Fus p 9.0101 and Pen ch 18 also exists.

Vacuolar serine protease is a major allergen of Fusarium proliferatum and an IgE-cross reactive pan-fungal allergen.  
Yeh CC, Tai HY, Chou H, Wu KG, Shen HD.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):438-444

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Orthologous allergens and diagnostic utility of major allergen Alt a 1.
For some fungi, such as Alternaria alternata (A. alternata), the symptoms of asthma are persistent, increasing disease severity and the risk of fatal outcomes. With the difficulties in obtaining adequate standardized extracts, means that there remain significant challenges in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy associated with fungi. The aim of this study was to determine hypersensitivity to indoor fungi in a population from Cuenca, Spain. Thirty-five patients with symptoms compatible with rhinitis or asthma who showed clear worsening of their symptoms in their homes or workplace were included. Ulocladium botrytis (U. botrytis) and A. alternata were the most representative species as a source of home sensitization. These species showed very high concordance in skin tests, specific IgE, and histamine release. The allergen Alt a 1, which was recognized in all patients, was detected in A. alternata, U. botrytis, and Stemphylium botryosum (S. botryosum). Alt a 1 was recognized in all patients and may be considered a non-species-specific allergen that could be used as a diagnostic source of sensitization to some species of the Pleosporaceae family.

Orthologous allergens and diagnostic utility of major allergen Alt a 1.  
Moreno A, Pineda F, Alcover J, Rodriguez D, Palacios R, Martinez-Naves E.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):428-437

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Does spore count matter in fungal allergy?: the role of allergenic fungal species.
The major factor causing exacerbation of allergic symptoms in established fungal allergic patients may be the spore concentration of specific allergenic fungi rather than the total fungal concentration. These results may be useful in making recommendations as regards environmental control for fungal allergic patients

Does spore count matter in fungal allergy?: the role of allergenic fungal species.  
Lin WR, Chen YH, Lee MF, Hsu LY, Tien CJ, Shih FM, Hsiao SC, Wang PH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):404-411

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A novel combination of an IgE mediated adult onset food allergy and a suspected mast cell activation syndrome presenting as anaphylaxis.
Adult onset food allergy is a rare, but increasingly recognized phenomenon. Mast cell activation syndromes present an ongoing diagnostic and classification challenge. The combination of the two has been rarely described in the literature. In this report, onset of IgE mediated food allergy in combination with a mast cell activation syndrome in an elderly patient not known to have a history of atopy is presented. He presented to a hospital with a first presentation of anaphylaxis manifesting profound hypotension following consumption of a stew consisting of fish and shellfish. He had a persistently elevated serum tryptase and demonstrated evidence of high titre serum specific IgE to shellfish. He responded well to histaminergic blockade.

A novel combination of an IgE mediated adult onset food allergy and a suspected mast cell activation syndrome presenting as anaphylaxis.  
Barber C, Kalicinsky C.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1246

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy test outcomes in patients self-reported as having penicillin allergy: Two-year experience.
Penicillin allergy is associated with increased antibiotic resistance and health care costs. However, most patients with self-reported penicillin allergy are not truly allergic. The objective of this study was to summarize the authors experience with allergy tests in patients with a history of penicillin allergy and to compare them with the results of other groups. The study concludes that only 28.6% of patients with self-reported penicillin allergy were confirmed to be allergic. Importantly, when the index drug is amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or flucloxacillin, the patients may tolerate amoxicillin

Allergy test outcomes in patients self-reported as having penicillin allergy: Two-year experience.  
Meng J, Thursfield D, Lukawska JJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):273-279

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow's milk allergy guidelines: a quality appraisal with the AGREE II instrument.
The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases were searched from 2010 to November 2015. The methodological rigour, quality, and transparency of relevant guidelines were assessed with the use of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool. A number of guidelines on CMA are available; however, their quality varies. Overall, the guidelines developed by recognized professional/scientific organizations were of the highest quality. These guidelines should be recommended for use. Still, the methodological quality of CMA guidelines may be improved

Cow's milk allergy guidelines: a quality appraisal with the AGREE II instrument.  
Ruszczynski M, Horvath A, Dziechciarz P, Szajewska H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Sep;46(9):1236-1241

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Unmet diagnostic needs in contact oral mucosal allergies.
The oral mucosa including the lips is constantly exposed to several noxious stimuli, irritants and allergens. However, oral contact pathologies are not frequently seen because of the relative resistance of the oral mucosa to irritant agents and allergens due to anatomical and physiological factors. The spectrum of signs and symptoms of oral contact allergies (OCA) is broad and a large number of condition can be the clinical expression of OCA such as allergic contact stomatitis, allergic contact cheilitis, geographic tongue, oral lichenoid reactions, burning mouth syndrome. The main etiological factors causing OCA are dental materials, food and oral hygiene products, as they contain flavouring agents and preservatives. The personal medical history of the patient is helpful to perform a diagnosis, as a positive history for recent dental procedures. Sometimes histology is mandatory. When it cannot identify a direct cause of a substance, in both acute and chronic OCA, patch tests can play a pivotal role in the diagnosis. However, patch tests might have several pitfalls. Indeed, the presence of metal ions as haptens and specifically the differences in their concentrations in oral mucosa and in standard preparation for patch testing and in the differences in pH of the medium might result in either false positive/negative reactions or non-specific irritative reactions. Another limitation of patch test results is the difficulty to assess the clinical relevance of haptens contained in dental materials and only the removal of dental materials or the avoidance of other contactant and consequent improvement of the disease may demonstrate the haptens' responsibility. In conclusion, the wide spectrum of clinical presentations, the broad range of materials and allergens which can cause it, the difficult interpretation of patch-test results, the clinical relevance assessment of haptens found positive at patch test are the main factors that make sometimes difficult the diagnosis and the management of OCA that requires an interdisciplinary approach to the patient.

Unmet diagnostic needs in contact oral mucosal allergies.  
Minciullo PL, Paolino G, Vacca M, Gangemi S, Nettis E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;14(1):10

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Invited Commentary: Alpha-Gal allergy: tip of the iceberg to a pivotal immune response.
The syndrome of delayed allergic reactions to the carbohydrate galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose ('alpha-gal') has become increasingly recognized in allergy and immunology clinics regionally throughout the southeastern USA. Due to the increasing awareness of this unique food allergy, cases have been identified in the northeastern and central USA as well as in Central and South America, Europe, Asia, Scandinavia, and Australia. Clinically, alpha-gal allergy is characterized by reactions to non-primate mammalian meat (e.g., beef, pork, lamb) that occur 3-6 h following exposure. The IgE response to alpha-gal is thought to develop after tick bites and can result in the loss of tolerance to foods that have been safely consumed for years. Although the initial description of alpha-gal allergy in 2009 was limited to red meat, this epitope is now identified in an expanded number of products, medications and foods-both labeled and unlabeled. Moreover, we are beginning to recognize that alpha-gal food allergy is the tip of the iceberg for this immune response.

Invited Commentary: Alpha-Gal allergy: tip of the iceberg to a pivotal immune response.  
Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):61

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
rAed a 4: A New 67-kDa Aedes aegypti mosquito salivary allergen for the diagnosis of mosquito allergy.
The authors have previously studied 3 recombinant (r) Aedes aegypti mosquito salivary allergens: rAed a 1, rAed a 2 and rAed a 3. Here, they report the expression, purification, identification and evaluation of rAed a 4, a 67-kDa alpha-glucosidase. Purified rAed a 4 bound to the IgE in mosquito-allergic sera: 46% of the 13 allergic individuals had a positive IgE, while none of the controls was positive.

rAed a 4: A New 67-kDa Aedes aegypti mosquito salivary allergen for the diagnosis of mosquito allergy.  
Peng Z, Caihe L, Beckett AN, Guan Q, James AA, Simons FE.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 8;170(3):206-210

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Insect sting reactions and specific IgE to venom and major allergens in a general population.
Questionnaire data and results from measurements of specific IgE against venom, major allergens and cross-reacting carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) were collected from 2,090 adult participants in a cross-sectional survey. 13% of the population reported symptoms of sting reactions and about half were systemic in nature. In all, 15% were sensitized to venom but only 31% of these had reacted to stings and only 38% of those with reactions had IgE to venom. In addition, 12% with IgE to venom were double-sensitized (DS), i.e. to both bee and wasp venom. Among DS IgE to major venom allergens, rApi m 1, rVes v 1 and rVes v 5 were negative and of no help in 31%, but 59% could be identified as likely sensitized to bee or wasp. IgE to CCDs occurred in only 0.7%, but 80% of these were DS. Finally, 36% with IgE to CCDs had had symptoms, mostly local. Serum tryptase was not associated with a history of sting reactions. In a temperate climate, self-reported insect sting reactions and sensitization to venom are frequent, but in most cases, these are not seen in the same individual. In DS individuals, measurements of IgE to major allergens can be helpful in some but not all cases and additional analyses are needed. IgE to CCDs may have some clinical relevance.

Insect sting reactions and specific IgE to venom and major allergens in a general population.  
Mosbech H, Tang L, Linneberg A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 3;170(3):194-200

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Frequent use of household cleaning products is associated with rhinitis in Chinese children.
This study concludes that frequent use of chemical cleaning products at home is associated with an increase in the odds of rhinitis in Chinese primary school children

Frequent use of household cleaning products is associated with rhinitis in Chinese children.  
Liu X, Lao XQ, Wong CC, Tan L, Zhang Z, Wong TW, Tse LA, Lau AP, Yu IT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):754-760

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Food allergy: practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention.  
Padua I, Moreira A, Moreira P, Barros R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;48(5):174-181
Click to view abstract

Milk hypersensitivities: where is the grey line regarding their dietary management?  
Vassilopoulou E, Efthymiou D.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;48(5):164-173
Click to view abstract

Histamine intolerance and dietary management: A complete review.  
San MM, Brachero S, Garicano VE.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):475-483
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Mould and grass pollen allergy as risk factors for childhood asthma in Zaragoza, Spain.  
Segura N, Fraj J, Cubero JL, Sobrevia MT, Lezaun A, Ferrer L, Sebastian A, Colas C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):455-460
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Sensitisation to mites and other animal-derived home aeroallergens in children and its concordance as a measure of covariation of sensitisation.  
Moral L, Toral T.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):427-432
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Oral mite anaphylaxis mimicking acute asthma.  
Garcia ME, Sanchez-Borges M, Capriles-Hulett A, Fernandez-Caldas E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):484-485

Increased prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae serological positivity in Chilean young children.  
Carcey J, Garcia P, Padilla O, Castro-Rodriguez JA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):467-471
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Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in pre-school children with cow's milk allergy.  
Topal E, Catal F, Soylu N, Ozcan OO, Celiksoy MH, Babayigit A, Erge D, Karakoc HT, Sancak R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2016 Sep;44(5):445-449
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Active treatment for food allergy.  
Kobernick AK, Burks AW.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 13;
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Eosinophilia in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Japan.  
Kimura M, Shimomura M, Morishita H, Meguro T, Seto S.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 10;
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Celebration of the 50th anniversary of IgE discovery.  
Saito H.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 20;

Prevention of food allergy - Early dietary interventions.  
Du Toit G, Foong RM, Lack G.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 8;
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Food allergy: Past, present and future.  
Sampson HA.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 6;
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Validation and reliability of the Japanese version of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Parent Form.  
Mizuno Y, Ohya Y, Nagao M, DunnGalvin A, Fujisawa T.
Allergol Int 2016 Sep 2;
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Ana o 3-specific IgE is a good predictor for clinically relevant cashew allergy in children.  
Lange L, Lasota L, Finger A, Vlajnic D, Busing S, Meister J, Brockaert I, Pfannenstiel C, Friedrichs F, Price M, Trendelenburg V, Niggemann B, Beyer K.
Allergy 2016 Sep 19;
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Allergy testing in children with persistent asthma: Comparison of four diagnostic methods.  
Onell A, Whiteman A, Nordlund B, Baldracchini F, Mazzoleni G, Hedlin G, Gronlund H, Konradsen JR.
Allergy 2016 Sep 17;
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Assessment of children's nutritional attitudes before oral food challenges to identify patients at risk of food reintroduction failure: a prospective study.  
Polloni L, Ferruzza E, Ronconi L, Toniolo A, Lazzarotto F, Bonaguro R, Celegato N, Muraro A.
Allergy 2016 Sep 23;
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High incidence and persistence of airborne allergen sensitization up to age 19 years.  
Ronmark E, Warm K, Bjerg A, Backman H, Hedman L, Lundback B.
Allergy 2016 Sep 23;
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Cannabis sativa allergy: looking through the fog.  
Decuyper II, Van Gasse AL, Cop N, Sabato V, Faber M, Mertens C, Bridts CH, Hagendorens MM, De CL, Rihs HP, Ebo DG.
Allergy 2016 Sep 3;
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The clinical relevance of birch pollen profilin cross reactivity in sensitized patients.  
Wolbing F, Kunz J, Kempf WE, Grimmel C, Fischer J, Biedermann T.
Allergy 2016 Sep 2;
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Microbiome and its impact on gastrointestinal atopy.  
Muir AB, Benitez AJ, Dods K, Spergel JM, Fillon SA.
Allergy 2016 Sep;71(9):1256-1263
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Comparison of pain during skin-prick testing, immunizations, and phlebotomy.  
Coop CA, Forester JP.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2016 Sep;37(5):93-97
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Vacuolar serine protease is a major allergen of Fusarium proliferatum and an IgE-cross reactive pan-fungal allergen.  
Yeh CC, Tai HY, Chou H, Wu KG, Shen HD.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):438-444
Click to view abstract

Orthologous allergens and diagnostic utility of major allergen Alt a 1.  
Moreno A, Pineda F, Alcover J, Rodriguez D, Palacios R, Martinez-Naves E.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):428-437
Click to view abstract

Does spore count matter in fungal allergy?: the role of allergenic fungal species.  
Lin WR, Chen YH, Lee MF, Hsu LY, Tien CJ, Shih FM, Hsiao SC, Wang PH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):404-411
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Does specific fungal allergen really matter?  
Yoo Y.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Sep;8(5):389-390

A novel combination of an IgE mediated adult onset food allergy and a suspected mast cell activation syndrome presenting as anaphylaxis.  
Barber C, Kalicinsky C.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;1246
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High Chinese elm pollen counts in the fall in Atlanta, Georgia, 2009-2015.  
Shams M, Fineman S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep 13;

Annatto seed hypersensitivity in a pediatric patient.  
Ramsey NB, Tuano KT, Davis CM, Dillard K, Hanson C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):331-333

Allergy test outcomes in patients self-reported as having penicillin allergy: Two-year experience.  
Meng J, Thursfield D, Lukawska JJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):273-279
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of fish and shellfish allergy: A systematic review.  
Moonesinghe H, Mackenzie H, Venter C, Kilburn S, Turner P, Weir K, Dean T.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):264-272
Click to view abstract

Chronic food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: Characterization of clinical phenotype and literature review.  
Weinberger T, Feuille E, Thompson C, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):227-233

Allergy to apple cultivars among patients with birch pollinosis and oral allergy syndrome.  
Wagner A, Szwed A, Buczylko K, Wagner W.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep 1;
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Systemic mastocytosis presenting as occupational IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to pine processionary caterpillar.  
Morales-Cabeza C, Prieto-Garcia A, Acero S, Bartolome-Zavala B, Morgado JM, Matito A, Sanchez-Munoz L, varez-Twose I.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):333-334

Variations in pollen counts between Indianapolis, IN, and Dayton, OH, in spring 2013 and 2014.  
Vitalpur G, Padgett S, Kloepfer KM, Slaven J, Leickly FE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):328-329

Food allergy education program at an elementary school: A pilot study.  
Yamamoto-Hanada K, Honda T, Kurihara J, Ishitsuka K, Futamura M, Ohya Y.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Sep;117(3):318-319

Incidence of apnea attack as allergic reaction after oral food challenge in patient with IgE-mediated wheat allergy. [Japanese]  
Akashi M.
Arerugi 2016 Aug;65(8):1018-1021
Click to view abstract

The dispersion of herbaceous plant pollen in Ito city, Shizuoka. [Japanese]  
Fujii M, Makiyama K, Okazaki K, Hisamatsu K.
Arerugi 2016 Aug;65(8):999-1008
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergy. [Japanese]  
Ishizuka T, Morikawa M.
Arerugi 2016 Aug;65(8):963-973

Cow's milk allergy guidelines: a quality appraisal with the AGREE II instrument.  
Ruszczynski M, Horvath A, Dziechciarz P, Szajewska H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Sep;46(9):1236-1241
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Sequence conservation predicts T cell reactivity against ragweed allergens.  
Pham J, Oseroff C, Hinz D, Sidney J, Paul S, Greenbaum J, Vita R, Phillips E, Mallal S, Peters B, Sette A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Sep;46(9):1194-1205
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Unmet diagnostic needs in contact oral mucosal allergies.  
Minciullo PL, Paolino G, Vacca M, Gangemi S, Nettis E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2016;14(1):10
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Female infertility and serum auto-antibodies: a systematic review.  
Deroux A, Dumestre-Perard C, Dunand-Faure C, Bouillet L, Hoffmann P.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 14;
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Cashew nut allergy: clinical relevance and allergen characterisation.  
Mendes C, Costa J, Vicente AA, Oliveira MB, Mafra I.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 1;
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House dust mite allergens: new discoveries and relevance to the allergic patient.  
Thomas WR.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):69
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Proteomics for allergy: from proteins to the patients.  
Nony E, Le MM, Brier S, Martelet A, Moingeon P.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):64
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Biomarkers in Occupational Asthma.  
Dominguez-Ortega J, Barranco P, Rodriguez-Perez R, Quirce S.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):63
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Innate immune responses to fungal allergens.  
Portnoy JM, Williams PB, Barnes CS.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):62
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Invited Commentary: Alpha-Gal allergy: tip of the iceberg to a pivotal immune response.  
Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Sep;16(9):61
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ABC OF ALLERGIES Food Allergy  
S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(1):41-
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Advances in the laboratory diagnosis of food allergy  
C van Rooyen, S van den Berg
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):77-
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Advances in the dietary management of food allergy  
R Meyer, AC Lozinsky
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):84-
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“Midnight anaphylaxis” to red meat in patients with alpha-gal sensitisation: a recent discovery in the food allergy world and a case report from South Africa  
CL Gray, A van Zyl, L Strauss
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):102-
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ETHICS: Food allergy: a human rights issue?  
S Kling
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):106-
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Work-related asthma among workers in wood processing industry: a review  
P Chamba, E Nunes
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):110-
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ABC OF ALLERGIES: Hypersensitivity to seafood and fish  
S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):118-
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CASE STUDY: Sherbet! Two cases of food additive reactions  
CL Gray
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(2):118-
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Multiple Drug Intolerance Syndrome  
J Peter
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):152-
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Food allergies  
G du Toit
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):170-
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Allergies and other occupational diseases in the hairdressing industry  
V Chongo-Faruk
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):180-
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ABC OF ALLERGIES - Egg allergy  
S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):190-
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CASE STUDY - Allergy to apple seeds in a peanut-allergic child  
E Tankama, CL Gray
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):194-
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ALLSA CONGRESS ABSTRACTS  

Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2016;29(3):202-
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Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in asthma.  
Knutsen AP.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2016 Sep 22;1-4

rAed a 4: A New 67-kDa Aedes aegypti mosquito salivary allergen for the diagnosis of mosquito allergy.  
Peng Z, Caihe L, Beckett AN, Guan Q, James AA, Simons FE.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 8;170(3):206-210
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Insect sting reactions and specific IgE to venom and major allergens in a general population.  
Mosbech H, Tang L, Linneberg A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Sep 3;170(3):194-200
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Mathematical models are not sufficient for the diagnosis of drug allergy.  
Dona I, Salas M, Torres MJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Sep;4(5):1015-1016

Food allergy sensitization and presentation in siblings of food allergic children.  
Gupta RS, Walkner MM, Greenhawt M, Lau CH, Caruso D, Wang X, Pongracic JA, Smith B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Sep;4(5):956-962
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Predictive models in drug allergy: An appropriate patient selection is needed.  
Moreno E, Munoz-Bellido FJ, Laffond E, Davila IJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Sep;4(5):1015

Der p 11 is a major allergen for house dust mite-allergic patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.  
Banerjee S, Resch Y, Chen KW, Swoboda I, Focke-Tejkl M, Blatt K, Novak N, Wickman M, van Hage M7, Ferrara R8, Mari A8, Purohit A9, Pauli G9, et al.
J Invest Dermatol 2015 Jan;135(1):102-9.
Abstract

Specific IgE to Jug r 1 has no additional value compared to extract based testing in diagnosing walnut allergy in adults.  
Blankestijn MA, Blom M, Otten HG, Baumert JL, Taylor SL, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Houben GF, Knulst AC, Klemans RJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep 2;
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Role of regulatory B cells in immune tolerance to allergens and beyond.  
van d, Stanic B, Wirz OF, Jansen K, Globinska A, Akdis M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):654-665
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Frequent use of household cleaning products is associated with rhinitis in Chinese children.  
Liu X, Lao XQ, Wong CC, Tan L, Zhang Z, Wong TW, Tse LA, Lau AP, Yu IT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):754-760
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Identification and gene cloning of a new major allergen Cha o 3 from Chamaecyparis obtusa (Japanese cypress) pollen.  
Osada T, Harada T, Asaka N, Haruma T, Kino K, Sasaki E, Okano M, Yamada A, Utsugi T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):911-913

Epigenome-wide association study links site-specific DNA methylation changes with cow's milk allergy.  
Hong X, Ladd-Acosta C, Hao K, Sherwood B, Ji H, Keet CA, Kumar R, Caruso D, Liu X, Wang G, Chen Z, Ji Y, Mao G, Walker SO, Bartell TR, Ji Z, Sun Y, Tsai HJ, Pongracic JA, Weeks DE, Wang X.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):908-911

Anaphylactic reactions associated with omalizumab administration: Analysis of a case-control study.  
Lieberman PL, Umetsu DT, Carrigan GJ, Rahmaoui A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Sep;138(3):913-915

Breastfeeding and timing of first dietary introduction in relation to childhood asthma, allergies, and airway diseases: a cross-sectional study.  
Huang C, Liu W, Cai J, Weschler LB, Wang X, Hu Y, Zou Z, Shen L, Sundell J.
J Asthma 2016 Sep 7;0
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Lettuce allergy is a lipid transfer syndrome-related food allergy with high risk of severe reactions.  
Munoz-Garcia E, Luengo-Sanchez O, Moreno-Perez N, Cuesta-Herranz J, Pastor-Vargas C, Cardona V.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2016 Sep 9;27(2):0
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A rare cause of aeroallergen-induced anaphylaxis: horse allergy.  
Cavkaytar Ö, Soyer Ö, Sekerel BE.
Miscellaneous Turk J Pediatr 2014 Jul-Aug;56(4):437-9.
Abstract

Identification and characterization of major cat allergen Fel d 1 mimotopes on filamentous phage carriers.  
Luzar J, Molek P, Silar M, Korosec P, Kosnik M, Strukelj B, Lunder M.
Mol Immunol 2016 Mar;71176-183

Molecular and immunological analysis of hen's egg yolk allergens with a focus on YGP42 (Gal d 6).  
De SC, Dhanapala P, Doran T, Tang ML, Suphioglu C.
Mol Immunol 2016 Mar;71152-160

Using patient serum to epitope map soybean glycinins reveals common epitopes shared with many legumes and tree nuts.  
Saeed H, Gagnon C, Cober E, Gleddie S.
Mol Immunol 2016 Feb;70125-133

Current advances of murine models for food allergy.  
Liu T, Navarro S, Lopata AL.
Mol Immunol 2016 Feb;70104-117


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